February 26 Incident

26 February IncidentFebruary 26, 1936February 26th IncidentNi Ni Roku IncidentYoung Officers Movement2-26 Incident2.26 Incident26 February ''coup d'état26 February 1936attempted a coup d'état
The February 26 Incident was an attempted coup d'état in the Empire of Japan on 26 February 1936.wikipedia
190 Related Articles

Imperial Way Faction

KōdōhaKodohaKodaha
The radical Kōdō-ha faction lost its influence within the army, the period of "government by assassination" came to a close, and the military increased its control over the civilian government. By the early 1930s officers in the high command had become split into two main informal groups: the Kōdō-ha "Imperial Way" faction led by Gen. Araki Sadao and his ally Gen. Jinzaburō Mazaki and the Tōsei-ha "Control" faction identified with Gen. Tetsuzan Nagata.
The radical Kōdōha rivaled the moderate Tōseiha (Control Faction) for influence in the army until the February 26 Incident in 1936, when it was de facto dissolved and many supporters were disciplined or executed.

Tōseiha

ToseihaControl FactionTōsei-ha
By the early 1930s officers in the high command had become split into two main informal groups: the Kōdō-ha "Imperial Way" faction led by Gen. Araki Sadao and his ally Gen. Jinzaburō Mazaki and the Tōsei-ha "Control" faction identified with Gen. Tetsuzan Nagata.
The Tōseiha rivaled the Kōdōha for influence in the army until the February 26 Incident in 1936, when the Kōdōha was de facto dissolved and many supporters were disciplined or executed.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
The February 26 Incident was an attempted coup d'état in the Empire of Japan on 26 February 1936.
On February 26, 1936, a coup d'état was attempted (the February 26 Incident).

Ikki Kita

Kita IkkiKITA, Ikki (pseud.) (Kita Terujiro)
These beliefs were strongly influenced by contemporary nationalist thought, especially the political philosophy of the former socialist Ikki Kita.
The government saw Kita's ideas as disruptive and dangerous; in 1937 he was implicated, although not directly involved, in a failed coup attempt and executed.

Sadao Araki

Araki SadaoAraki
By the early 1930s officers in the high command had become split into two main informal groups: the Kōdō-ha "Imperial Way" faction led by Gen. Araki Sadao and his ally Gen. Jinzaburō Mazaki and the Tōsei-ha "Control" faction identified with Gen. Tetsuzan Nagata.
Then Kodoha-affiliated officers launched another rebellion in the 1936 February 26 Incident.

Keisuke Okada

Okada KeisukeOkada administrationOkada
Although the rebels succeeded in assassinating several leading officials (including two former prime ministers) and in occupying the government center of Tokyo, they failed to assassinate Prime Minister Keisuke Okada or secure control of the Imperial Palace.
He narrowly escaped assassination in the February 26 Incident of 1936, largely because rebel troops killed Colonel Denzō Matsuo, brother-in-law as well as personal secretary of Okada's, by misidentifying him as the prime minister.

Tomoyuki Yamashita

General YamashitaYamashita TomoyukiGeneral Tomoyuki Yamashita
These included Minister of War Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Araki, Mazaki, Tomoyuki Yamashita, Kanji Ishiwara, Shigeru Honjō and their own immediate commanders, Kōhei Kashii and Takeo Hori.
After the February 26 Incident of 1936, he fell into disfavor with Emperor Hirohito due to his appeal for leniency toward rebel officers involved in the attempted coup.

Jōtarō Watanabe

Jotaro Watanabe
Jōtarō Watanabe was a general in the early Shōwa period Imperial Japanese Army, noted as one of the victims of the February 26 Incident.

Yasuhito, Prince Chichibu

Prince ChichibuChichibuYasuhito
It had sympathizers among the general staff and imperial family, most notably Prince Chichibu, the Emperor's brother (and, until 1933, heir), who was friends with Nishida and other Kokutai Genri-ha leaders.
Prince Chichibu has been implicated by some historians in the abortive 26 February Incident in 1936.

1st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

IJA 1st Division1st Division1st Infantry Division
The bulk of the army was made up of men from the 1st Division's 1st Infantry Regiment (11th and MG companies; 456 men) and 3rd Infantry Regiment (1st, 3rd, 6th, 7th, 10th, and MG companies; 937 men).
The February 26 Incident was an attempted coup d'état staged by elements of the 1st Division in Tokyo in 1936.

Hokushin-ron

Strike North GroupStrike Northexpansion to the north
The Kōdō-ha emphasized the importance of Japanese culture, spiritual purity over material quality and the need to attack the Soviet Union (Hokushin-ron), while the Tōsei-ha officers, who were strongly influenced by the ideas of the contemporary German general staff, supported central economic and military planning (total war theory), technological modernization, mechanization and expansion within China (Nanshin-ron).
In 1936, Kōdōha-affiliated young Army officers launched an unsuccessful coup d'état in the February 26 Incident.

Kanji Ishiwara

Kanji IshiharaGeneral IshiwaraIshiwara Kanji
These included Minister of War Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Araki, Mazaki, Tomoyuki Yamashita, Kanji Ishiwara, Shigeru Honjō and their own immediate commanders, Kōhei Kashii and Takeo Hori.
When the February 26 Incident erupted in 1936, rebels assassinated a number of major politicians and government leaders and demanded a change in government in line with Ishiwara's philosophies.

Asahi Shimbun

AsahiThe Asahi ShimbunAsahi Newspaper
At approximately 10:00 Kurihara and Nakahashi boarded three trucks with 60 men and traveled from the Prime Minister's Residence to the offices of the Tokyo Asahi Shimbun, a prominent liberal newspaper.
Indeed, the newspaper's liberal position led to its vandalization during the February 26 Incident of 1936, as well as repeated attacks from the right wing throughout this period (and for that matter, throughout its history).

Gunbatsu

factional disputefactionalismImperial Japanese Army politics and background
The Imperial Japanese Army had a long history of factionalism among its high-ranking officers, originally stemming from domainal rivalries in the Meiji period.
Although the Control Faction emerged dominate after the February 26 Incident of 1936, elements of both factions continued to dominate Army politics until the surrender of Japan and abolition of the Japanese military in 1945.

Jinzaburō Masaki

Jinsaburo MazakiJinzaburo MazakiJinzaburō Mazaki
By the early 1930s officers in the high command had become split into two main informal groups: the Kōdō-ha "Imperial Way" faction led by Gen. Araki Sadao and his ally Gen. Jinzaburō Mazaki and the Tōsei-ha "Control" faction identified with Gen. Tetsuzan Nagata.
Dissatisfaction with Masaki's forced retirement resulted in the assassination of Nagata the following year which, in turn, led to the February 26 Incident of 1936.

Shirō Nonaka

Capt. Shirō Nonaka took nearly a third of all the rebels' troops, 500 men from the 3rd Infantry Regiment, to attack police headquarters, located directly south of the Imperial Palace, with the goal of securing its communication equipment and preventing the dispatch of the police's Emergency Service Unit .
Shirō Nonaka was an Imperial Japanese Army officer who was a central conspirator in the February 26 Incident in 1936.

Kwantung Army

Kwangtung ArmyGuandong ArmyKantōgun
Members or former members of the Kwantung Army were active in numerous coup d'état attempts against the civilian government, culminating with the February 26 Incident of 1936, where the Kōdōha faction was de facto dissolved.

Shōwa Restoration

Showa RestorationShowa ReformationShōwa Reformation
The solution, they believed, was a "Shōwa Restoration" modeled on the Meiji Restoration of 70 years earlier.
The February 26 Incident was another attempt to bring it about, failing heavily because they were unable to secure the support of the Emperor.

Shigeru Honjō

Shigeru HonjoHonjō Shigeru
These included Minister of War Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Araki, Mazaki, Tomoyuki Yamashita, Kanji Ishiwara, Shigeru Honjō and their own immediate commanders, Kōhei Kashii and Takeo Hori.
Honjō later became Chief aide-de-camp to Emperor Hirohito until 1936, when his suspected involvement in the February 26 Incident led to his retirement.

Yoshitsugu Tatekawa

Tatekawa Yoshitsugu
His military career ended when he was forced to pull back from military service because of the February 26 Incident.

Makino Nobuaki

Nobuaki Makino
This made him a target for the militarists, and he narrowly escaped assassination at his villa in Yugawara during the February 26 Incident in 1936.

Takahashi Korekiyo

Korekiyo TakahashiTakahashiTakahashi administration
Despite considerable success, his fiscal policies involving reduction of military expenditures created many enemies within the military, and he was among those assassinated by rebelling military officers in the February 26 Incident of 1936.

Yoshiyuki Kawashima

These included Minister of War Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Araki, Mazaki, Tomoyuki Yamashita, Kanji Ishiwara, Shigeru Honjō and their own immediate commanders, Kōhei Kashii and Takeo Hori.
Kawashima became Army Minister in 1935, but was forced into retirement due to implications of his involvement with the attempted coup plotters of the February 26th Incident of 1936.

Kōhei Kashii

Kohei Kashii
These included Minister of War Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Araki, Mazaki, Tomoyuki Yamashita, Kanji Ishiwara, Shigeru Honjō and their own immediate commanders, Kōhei Kashii and Takeo Hori.
In the February 26 Incident attempted coup d'état of 1936, Kashii was a leader of government forces that suppressed the revolt.

Saionji Kinmochi

SaionjiKinmochi SaionjiSaionji administration
He was detested by the militarists and was on the list of those to be assassinated in the attempted coup of February 26, 1936.