Federal Bureau of Investigation

FBIFBI agentF.B.I.Bureau of InvestigationFBI Special AgentFederal Bureau of InvestigationsFederal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)FBI agentsFBI informantThe Federal Bureau of Investigation
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency.wikipedia
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Federal law enforcement in the United States

List of United States federal law enforcement agenciesfederal law enforcement agencyfederal law enforcement
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency.
It includes the United States Marshals Service (USMS), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), and others.

Security agency

security servicessecuritysecurity service
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency.
For example, the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the internal intelligence, security and law enforcement agency, while the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an external intelligence service, which deals primarily with intelligence collection overseas.

List of FBI field offices

field officeFBI field officefield offices
Unlike the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which has no law enforcement authority and is focused on intelligence collection abroad, the FBI is primarily a domestic agency, maintaining 56 field offices in major cities throughout the United States, and more than 400 resident agencies in smaller cities and areas across the nation.
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) operates 56 field offices in major cities throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.

United States Department of Justice

Department of JusticeU.S. Department of JusticeJustice Department
Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence.
The department was formed in 1870 during the Ulysses S. Grant administration, and administers several federal law enforcement agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Central Intelligence Agency

CIAC.I.A.Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
Unlike the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which has no law enforcement authority and is focused on intelligence collection abroad, the FBI is primarily a domestic agency, maintaining 56 field offices in major cities throughout the United States, and more than 400 resident agencies in smaller cities and areas across the nation.
Unlike the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is a domestic security service, the CIA has no law enforcement function and is mainly focused on overseas intelligence gathering, with only limited domestic intelligence collection.

J. Edgar Hoover Building

FBI HeadquartersFBI HQFBI Building
The FBI headquarters is the J. Edgar Hoover Building, located in Washington, D.C.
It is the headquarters of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

J. Edgar Hoover

HooverJ Edgar HooverJohn Edgar Hoover
J. Edgar Hoover served as FBI Director from 1924 to 1972, a combined 48 years with the BOI, DOI, and FBI.
John Edgar Hoover (January 1, 1895 – May 2, 1972) was the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States and an American law enforcement administrator.

United States Secret Service

Secret ServiceU.S. Secret ServiceUS Secret Service
Bonaparte reached out to other agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service, for personnel, investigators in particular.
Many of the agency's missions were later taken over by subsequent agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and IRS Criminal Investigation Division (IRS-CI).

Stanley Finch

Its first "Chief" (the title is now known as "Director") was Stanley Finch.
Stanley Wellington Finch (July 20, 1872 – 22 November 1951) was the first director of the Bureau of Investigation (1908–1912), which would eventually become the FBI.

Ma Barker

Barker GangKate "Ma" BarkerBarker
During the "War on Crime" of the 1930s, FBI agents apprehended or killed a number of notorious criminals who committed kidnappings, bank robberies, and murders throughout the nation, including John Dillinger, "Baby Face" Nelson, Kate "Ma" Barker, Alvin "Creepy" Karpis, and George "Machine Gun" Kelly.
Barker was killed during a shootout with the FBI, and she gained a reputation as a ruthless crime matriarch who controlled and organized her sons' crimes.

John Dillinger

DillingerJohn Dillinger gangDillinger gang
During the "War on Crime" of the 1930s, FBI agents apprehended or killed a number of notorious criminals who committed kidnappings, bank robberies, and murders throughout the nation, including John Dillinger, "Baby Face" Nelson, Kate "Ma" Barker, Alvin "Creepy" Karpis, and George "Machine Gun" Kelly.
In response, J. Edgar Hoover, then Director of the Bureau of Investigation (BOI), used Dillinger and his gang as his campaign platform to evolve the BOI into the FBI, developing more sophisticated investigative techniques as weapons against organized crime.

Federal crime in the United States

federal crimefederal offensefederal crimes
A leading U.S. counter-terrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes.
Numerous federal agencies have been granted powers to investigate federal offenses, including the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Internal Revenue Service, and the Secret Service.

Edwin Atherton

Atherton ReportEdwin N. Atherton
Additionally, through the work of Edwin Atherton, the BOI claimed to have successfully apprehended an entire army of Mexican neo-revolutionaries under the leadership of General Enrique Estrada in the mid-1920s, east of San Diego, California.
Edwin Newton Atherton (October 12, 1896 – August 31, 1944) served as a Foreign Service Officer, Bureau of Investigation (BOI) Agent, Private Investigator, and later, appointed head of the college athletics organization, the Pacific Coast Conference in 1940.

Alvin Karpis

Alvin "Creepy" KarpisKarpisAlvin Francis Karpavicz
During the "War on Crime" of the 1930s, FBI agents apprehended or killed a number of notorious criminals who committed kidnappings, bank robberies, and murders throughout the nation, including John Dillinger, "Baby Face" Nelson, Kate "Ma" Barker, Alvin "Creepy" Karpis, and George "Machine Gun" Kelly.
There were only four "public enemies" ever given the title of "Public Enemy #1" by the FBI and he was the only one to be taken alive.

White-collar crime

white collar crimewhite-collarwhite collar
The FBI also publishes some reports for both law enforcement personnel as well as regular citizens covering topics including law enforcement, terrorism, cybercrime, white-collar crime, violent crime, and statistics.
The FBI, concerned with identifying this type of offense, collects annual statistical information on only three categories: fraud, counterfeiting/forgery, and embezzlement.

FBI Laboratory

FBI crime labFederal Bureau of Investigation LaboratoryCrime Lab
He was chiefly responsible for creating the Scientific Crime Detection Laboratory, or the FBI Laboratory, which officially opened in 1932, as part of his work to professionalize investigations by the government.
The FBI Laboratory is a division within the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation that provides forensic analysis support services to the FBI, as well as to state and local law enforcement agencies free of charge.

Charles Joseph Bonaparte

Charles BonaparteCharles J. BonaparteCharles Bonaparte (Attorney General)
President Roosevelt instructed Attorney General Charles Bonaparte to organize an autonomous investigative service that would report only to the Attorney General.
During his tenure as the attorney general, he created the Bureau of Investigation which later grew and expanded by the 1920s under the director J. Edgar Hoover, (1895–1972), as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

Osage Indian murders

murders of Osagenumerous murdersOsage Murders
Early homicide investigations of the new agency included the Osage Indian murders.
Investigation by law enforcement, including the predecessor to the FBI, also revealed extensive corruption among local officials involved in the Osage guardian program.

Rudolf Abel

Vilyam Genrikhovich FisherRudolph AbelRudolf Ivanovich Abel
Another notable case was the arrest of Soviet spy Rudolf Abel in 1957.
He adopted his alias when arrested on charges of conspiracy by FBI agents in 1957.

FBI Index

Custodial Detention IndexGeneral Intelligence DivisionSecurity Index
In 1939, the Bureau began compiling a custodial detention list with the names of those who would be taken into custody in the event of war with Axis nations.
The FBI Indexes are a system used to track American citizens and other people by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) before the adoption by the FBI of computerized databases.

Machine Gun Kelly

George "Machine Gun" KellyGeorge KellyColson Baker
During the "War on Crime" of the 1930s, FBI agents apprehended or killed a number of notorious criminals who committed kidnappings, bank robberies, and murders throughout the nation, including John Dillinger, "Baby Face" Nelson, Kate "Ma" Barker, Alvin "Creepy" Karpis, and George "Machine Gun" Kelly.
Urschel had collected and left considerable evidence that assisted the subsequent FBI investigation, which eventually led to Kelly's arrest in Memphis, Tennessee, on September 26, 1933.

Bureau of Prohibition

Prohibition agentProhibition BureauProhibition Unit
The following year it was linked to the Bureau of Prohibition and rechristened the Division of Investigation (DOI) before finally becoming an independent service within the Department of Justice in 1935.
By 1933, with the Repeal of Prohibition imminent, it was briefly absorbed into the FBI, or "Bureau of Investigation" as it was then called, and became the Bureau's "Alcohol Beverage Unit," though, for practical purposes it continued to operate as a separate agency.

Ku Klux Klan

KKKKlansmanKlansmen
Other activities of its early decades included a decisive role in reducing the scope and influence of the white supremacist group Ku Klux Klan.
In April 1997, FBI agents arrested four members of the True Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in Dallas for conspiracy to commit robbery and for conspiring to blow up a natural gas processing plant.

Counterintelligence

counter-intelligencecounter-espionagecounterespionage
A leading U.S. counter-terrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes.
There is usually a domestic counterintelligence service, usually part of a larger law enforcement organization such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the United States.

United States Intelligence Community

Intelligence CommunityU.S. Intelligence CommunityU.S. intelligence
Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence.