Federal Communications Commission

FCCU.S. Federal Communications CommissionFederal Communications Commission (FCC)David A. BrayUnited States Federal Communications CommissionF.C.C.FCC CommissionerUS Federal Communications CommissionUS regulatory authorities1948 TV allocation "freeze
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute ( and ) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable.wikipedia
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Federal Radio Commission

FRCRadio Act of 19271927 Radio Act
The FCC was formed by the Communications Act of 1934 to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission.
The Federal Radio Commission (FRC) was a government agency that regulated United States radio communication from its creation in 1927 until 1934, when it was succeeded by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Communications Act of 1934

Federal Communications ActCommunications Act1934 Communications Act
The FCC was formed by the Communications Act of 1934 to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission. The FCC's mission, specified in Section One of the Communications Act of 1934 and amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (amendment to 47 U.S.C. §151) is to "make available so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex, rapid, efficient, Nationwide, and world-wide wire and radio communication services with adequate facilities at reasonable charges."
The Act replaced the Federal Radio Commission with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Telecommunications Act of 1996

1996 Telecommunications ActTelecommunications ActTelecom Act of 1996
The FCC's mission, specified in Section One of the Communications Act of 1934 and amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (amendment to 47 U.S.C. §151) is to "make available so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex, rapid, efficient, Nationwide, and world-wide wire and radio communication services with adequate facilities at reasonable charges."
According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the goal of the law was to "let anyone enter any communications business – to let any communications business compete in any market against any other."

Michael O'Rielly

Michael O'Rielly is a commissioner of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), an independent agency of the United States government.

Geoffrey Starks

Geoffrey Adam Starks is an American lawyer serving as a Commissioner of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Jessica Rosenworcel

Jessica Rosenworcel (born July 12, 1971) is an American attorney currently serving as a member of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Brendan Carr (lawyer)

Brendan Carr
Brendan Thomas Carr is an American lawyer who currently serves as a member of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Interstate Commerce Commission

ICCInterstate Commerce CommitteeUnited States Interstate Commerce Commission
The FCC took over wire communication regulation from the Interstate Commerce Commission.
In 1934, Congress transferred the telecommunications authority to the new Federal Communications Commission.

Technical Advisory Council

The Technical Advisory Council (TAC) is a federal advisory committee of the Federal Communications Commission and the FCC's Office of Engineering and Technology (OET).

Independent agencies of the United States government

independent agencyindependent agency of the United States governmentindependent agencies
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute ( and ) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable.

Electromagnetic interference

interferenceradio frequency interferenceRF interference
In 1979, legal limits were imposed on electromagnetic emissions from all digital equipment by the FCC in the USA in response to the increased number of digital systems that were interfering with wired and radio communications.

James Lawrence Fly

Larry FlyJames L. FlyJames Fly
In 1940, the Federal Communications Commission issued the "Report on Chain Broadcasting" which was led by new FCC chairman James Lawrence Fly (and Telford Taylor as general counsel).
James Lawrence "Larry" Fly (February 22, 1898 – January 6, 1966) was an American lawyer, famous as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and, later, director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Rosel H. Hyde

Rosel Hyde
As a result, the FCC stopped giving out construction permits for new licenses in October 1948, under the direction of Chairman Rosel H. Hyde.
Rosel H. Hyde (April 12, 1900 – December 19, 1992) served as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) twice under the four different presidents.

DuMont Television Network

DuMontDuMont NetworkDMN
Other FCC actions hurt the fledgling DuMont and ABC networks.
The network was hindered by the prohibitive cost of broadcasting, by regulations imposed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) which restricted the company's growth, and even by the company's partner, Paramount Pictures.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
The major point in the report was the breakup of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), which ultimately led to the creation of the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), but there were two other important points.
In 1934, the Mutual Broadcasting System filed a complaint to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), following the government agency's creation, claiming it ran into difficulties trying to establish new radio stations in a market largely controlled by NBC and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).

All-Channel Receiver Act

All Channels Actall-channel tuning1961
The Sixth Report and Order also provided for the "intermixture" of VHF and UHF channels in most markets; UHF transmitters in the 1950s were not yet powerful enough, nor receivers sensitive enough (if they included UHF tuners at all - they were not formally required until the 1960s All-Channel Receiver Act), to make UHF viable against entrenched VHF stations.
The All-Channel Receiver Act of 1962 (ACRA), commonly known as the All-Channels Act, was passed by the United States Congress in 1961, to allow the Federal Communications Commission to require that all television set manufacturers must include UHF tuners, so that new UHF-band TV stations (then channels 14 to 83) could be received by the public.

American Broadcasting Company

ABCABC-TVABC Network
The major point in the report was the breakup of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), which ultimately led to the creation of the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), but there were two other important points.
In 1934, Mutual filed a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regarding its difficulties in establishing new stations, in a radio market that was already being saturated by NBC and CBS.

Telford Taylor

General Telford TaylorTaylor, Telford
In 1940, the Federal Communications Commission issued the "Report on Chain Broadcasting" which was led by new FCC chairman James Lawrence Fly (and Telford Taylor as general counsel).
In 1940, he became general counsel for the Federal Communications Commission.

CBS

CBS TelevisionColumbia Broadcasting SystemCBS-TV
One was network option time, the culprit here being the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).
But as RCA and DuMont raced to establish networks and offer upgraded programming, CBS lagged, advocating an industry-wide shift and restart to UHF for their incompatible (with black and white) color system; the FCC putting an indefinite "freeze" on television licenses that lasted until 1952 also did not help matters.

List of chairmen of the Federal Communications Commission

Chairman of the Federal Communications CommissionChairmanChair of the Federal Communications Commission
A complete list of commissioners is available on the FCC website.
The following is a list of the chairmen of the Federal Communications Commission.

Frieda B. Hennock

Frieda Hennock
In addition, Frieda B. Hennock (D-NY) was the first female commissioner of the FCC.
Frieda Barkin Hennock (27 December 1904 – 20 June 1960) was the first female commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission and a central figure in the creation of an enduring system of educational television in the United States.

FCC fairness doctrine

Fairness DoctrinefairnessFairness rule
A number of regulations felt to be outdated were removed, most controversially the Fairness Doctrine in 1987.
The fairness doctrine of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), introduced in 1949, was a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses to both present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in the FCC's view—honest, equitable, and balanced.

Local Community Radio Act

The Local Community Radio Act in the 111th Congress has gotten out of committee and will go before the house floor with bi-partisan support, and unanimous support of the FCC.
The Local Community Radio Act is an act of broadcast law in the United States, explicitly authorizing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to license local low-power broadcasting in the FM broadcast band (LPFM).

Commercial broadcasting

commercialcommercial radiocommercial television
The FCC regulates broadcast stations, repeater stations as well as commercial broadcasting operators who operate and repair certain radiotelephone, television and radio stations.
When problems arose over patents and corporate marketing strategies, regulatory decisions were made by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to control commercial broadcasting.

Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show controversy

Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime showwardrobe malfunctionNipplegate
After the 1990s had passed, the FCC began to increase its censorship and enforcement of indecency regulations in the early 2000s to include a response to the Janet Jackson "wardrobe malfunction" that occurred during the halftime show of Super Bowl XXXVIII.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) fined CBS a record US$550,000 which was fought in the Supreme Court, but that fine was appealed and ultimately voided by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in a 2011 ruling, and a case to reinstate the fine was refused in 2012.