Federal Communications Commission fines of The Howard Stern Show

FCC fines of The Howard Stern Showfined US$495,000 for a number of statementsfines were issuedissued finesongoing FCC finesseveral fines
Between 1990 and 2004, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued fines totalling $2.5 million to radio licensees for airing material it deemed indecent from The Howard Stern Show, the highest amount of any American radio show.wikipedia
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The Howard Stern Show

Howard Stern ShowHoward SternHoward Stern Radio Show
Between 1990 and 2004, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued fines totalling $2.5 million to radio licensees for airing material it deemed indecent from The Howard Stern Show, the highest amount of any American radio show.
The show is also the most fined, after a total of $2.5 million in fines were issued by the Federal Communications Commission for what it deemed indecent material.

Howard Stern

SternHoward Stern on DemandThe Howard Stern Show
The FCC had received complaints about Howard Stern as early as 1981, but its limited power at the time prevented further action taking place. The FCC had received complaints from listeners about Howard Stern since 1981, when he hosted mornings at WWDC in Washington, D.C. The Communications Act of 1934 and First Amendment laws, however, limited its power to take further action.
He became the most fined radio host when the Federal Communications Commission issued fines totaling $2.5 million to station owners for content it deemed indecent.

Federal Communications Commission

FCCU.S. Federal Communications CommissionFederal Communications Commission (FCC)
Between 1990 and 2004, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued fines totalling $2.5 million to radio licensees for airing material it deemed indecent from The Howard Stern Show, the highest amount of any American radio show.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The Supreme Court had provided broadcasting guidelines for indecent material in its 1978 ruling in its landmark decision, in which the court prohibited the "seven dirty words" made famous by comedian George Carlin. In 1978, the United States Supreme Court upheld the FCC's authority to fine broadcasts for indecent programming at hours when children could be listening.

FCC v. Pacifica Foundation

Federal Communications Commission v. Pacifica FoundationFCC v. PacificaF.C.C. v. Pacifica Foundation
The Supreme Court had provided broadcasting guidelines for indecent material in its 1978 ruling in its landmark decision, in which the court prohibited the "seven dirty words" made famous by comedian George Carlin.

Seven dirty words

Seven Words You Can Never Say on TelevisionFilthy WordsSeven Words You Can't Say On Television
The Supreme Court had provided broadcasting guidelines for indecent material in its 1978 ruling in its landmark decision, in which the court prohibited the "seven dirty words" made famous by comedian George Carlin.

George Carlin

Brenda CarlinGeorge Carlin on God
The Supreme Court had provided broadcasting guidelines for indecent material in its 1978 ruling in its landmark decision, in which the court prohibited the "seven dirty words" made famous by comedian George Carlin.

Infinity Broadcasting Corporation

Infinity BroadcastingInfinityInfinity Radio
In 1990, Infinity Broadcasting, owner of Stern's flagship station WXRK and some of his syndication affiliates, was issued its first fine.

WNYL (FM)

WXRKWNYLWNOW-FM
In 1990, Infinity Broadcasting, owner of Stern's flagship station WXRK and some of his syndication affiliates, was issued its first fine.

Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show controversy

Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime showwardrobe malfunctionNipplegate
In 2004, the crackdown on broadcasting indecency following the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show controversy led to two additional fines being issued from past shows.

Sirius Satellite Radio

SiriusSirius RadioSiriusXM
Stern announced his departure from "terrestrial" radio to begin a five-year contract with Sirius Satellite Radio, a subscription-based satellite radio service not subjected to the FCC's broadcast obscenity rules.

Satellite radio

satelliteradiosubscription radio
Stern announced his departure from "terrestrial" radio to begin a five-year contract with Sirius Satellite Radio, a subscription-based satellite radio service not subjected to the FCC's broadcast obscenity rules.

Decency

indecentgross indecencyindecency
In 1978, the United States Supreme Court upheld the FCC's authority to fine broadcasts for indecent programming at hours when children could be listening.

WWDC (FM)

WWDCDC101WWDC-FM
The FCC had received complaints from listeners about Howard Stern since 1981, when he hosted mornings at WWDC in Washington, D.C. The Communications Act of 1934 and First Amendment laws, however, limited its power to take further action.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
The FCC had received complaints from listeners about Howard Stern since 1981, when he hosted mornings at WWDC in Washington, D.C. The Communications Act of 1934 and First Amendment laws, however, limited its power to take further action.

Communications Act of 1934

Federal Communications ActCommunications Act1934 Communications Act
The FCC had received complaints from listeners about Howard Stern since 1981, when he hosted mornings at WWDC in Washington, D.C. The Communications Act of 1934 and First Amendment laws, however, limited its power to take further action.

First Amendment to the United States Constitution

First AmendmentFirstU.S. Const. amend. I
The FCC had received complaints from listeners about Howard Stern since 1981, when he hosted mornings at WWDC in Washington, D.C. The Communications Act of 1934 and First Amendment laws, however, limited its power to take further action.

WNBC (AM)

WNBCWEAFWNBC-AM
In reply to a complaint about Stern in 1985, who by now had relocated to afternoons on WNBC in New York City, the FCC responded, "Our role in overseeing program content is...very limited...the First Amendment protects the right of broadcasters to air statements which may be offensive, and a free society requires governmental forbearance in those instances."

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In reply to a complaint about Stern in 1985, who by now had relocated to afternoons on WNBC in New York City, the FCC responded, "Our role in overseeing program content is...very limited...the First Amendment protects the right of broadcasters to air statements which may be offensive, and a free society requires governmental forbearance in those instances."

WIP-FM

WYSPWIPWYSP-FM
Stern entered national syndication when Infinity's WYSP in Philadelphia first simulcast his show on August 18, 1986.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Stern entered national syndication when Infinity's WYSP in Philadelphia first simulcast his show on August 18, 1986.

United States Code

U.S.C.U.S. Codefederal statute
Infinity was given 30 days to respond to three singled-out complaints that believed Stern had violated Section 1464 of the United States Code, as well as Philadelphia's community standards.

Donald Wildmon

Christian Leaders for Responsible TelevisionDon WildmonDonald E. Wildmon
Two of them were forwarded on September 26 and November 6 by Donald Wildmon, a United Methodist minister and director of the National Federation for Decency.

American Family Association

One Million MomsNational Federation for DecencyAFA
Two of them were forwarded on September 26 and November 6 by Donald Wildmon, a United Methodist minister and director of the National Federation for Decency.

National Center on Sexual Exploitation

Morality in Media
The third was filed on October 27 by Mary Keeley, a mother of a 15-year-old Stern fan, who was directed to the FCC by Morality in Media.