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Federal Art Project

FAPFederal Art Project (FAP)Federal Arts Project
Of the $4.88 billion allocated to the WPA, $27 million was approved for the employment of artists, musicians, writers and actors under the WPA's Federal Project Number One.
It was created not as a cultural activity but as a relief measure to employ artists and artisans to create murals, easel paintings, sculpture, graphic art, posters, photography, theatre scenic design, and arts and crafts.

Hallie Flanagan

Hallie Flanagan DavisFlanagan, Hallie
It was shaped by national director Hallie Flanagan into a federation of regional theatres that created relevant art, encouraged experimentation in new forms and techniques, and made it possible for millions of Americans to see live theatre for the first time.
Hallie Flanagan Davis (August 27, 1889 in Redfield, South Dakota – June 23, 1969 in Old Tappan, New Jersey) was an American theatrical producer and director, playwright, and author, best known as director of the Federal Theatre Project, a part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA).

Works Progress Administration

WPAWorks Progress Administration (WPA)Work Projects Administration
It was one of five Federal Project Number One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.
Hallie Flanagan, national director of the Federal Theatre Project, wrote that "for the first time in the relief experiments of this country the preservation of the skill of the worker, and hence the preservation of his self-respect, became important."

Orson Welles

WellesWellesianWelles, Orson
Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, John Houseman, Martin Ritt, Elia Kazan, Joseph Losey, Marc Blitzstein and Abe Feder are among those who became established, in part, through their work in the Federal Theatre. The most popular production was the third, which came to be called the Voodoo Macbeth (1936), director Orson Welles's adaptation of Shakespeare's play set on a mythical island suggesting the Haitian court of King Henri Christophe.
In his 20s, Welles directed a number of high-profile stage productions for the Federal Theatre Project, including an adaptation of Macbeth with an entirely African American cast, and the political musical The Cradle Will Rock.

John Houseman

Houseman, JohnJohn Houseman ProductionsJohn Houseman Studio Theater
Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, John Houseman, Martin Ritt, Elia Kazan, Joseph Losey, Marc Blitzstein and Abe Feder are among those who became established, in part, through their work in the Federal Theatre.
John Houseman (born Jacques Haussmann; September 22, 1902 – October 31, 1988) was a British-American actor and producer who became known for his highly publicized collaboration with director Orson Welles from their days in the Federal Theatre Project through to the production of Citizen Kane and his collaboration, as producer of The Blue Dahlia, with writer Raymond Chandler on the screenplay.

Susan Glaspell

Susan Giaspell
Many of the notable artists of the time participated in the Federal Theatre Project, including Susan Glaspell who served as Midwest bureau director.
During the Great Depression, Glaspell worked in Chicago for the Works Progress Administration, where she was Midwest Bureau Director of the Federal Theater Project.

The Cradle Will Rock

Blitzstein, Houseman, Welles and Feder collaborated on the controversial production, The Cradle Will Rock.
Originally a part of the Federal Theatre Project, it was directed by Orson Welles, and produced by John Houseman.

Living Newspaper

Living Newspapers
Living Newspapers were plays written by teams of researchers-turned-playwrights.
Though Living Newspapers originated in Russia during the Bolshevik Revolution, the English term is most often associated with the Living Newspapers produced by the Federal Theatre Project.

Federal Project Number One

Federal One Programs
Of the $4.88 billion allocated to the WPA, $27 million was approved for the employment of artists, musicians, writers and actors under the WPA's Federal Project Number One. It was one of five Federal Project Number One projects sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.
Federal Theatre Project

Federal Writers' Project

Federal Writer's ProjectFederal Writers ProjectFederal Writers’ Project
Of the $4.88 billion allocated to the WPA, $27 million was approved for the employment of artists, musicians, writers and actors under the WPA's Federal Project Number One.
Alsberg and Hallie Flanagan, his counterpart at the Federal Theatre Project, faced tremendous scrutiny from the committee.

Joseph Losey

Losey
Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, John Houseman, Martin Ritt, Elia Kazan, Joseph Losey, Marc Blitzstein and Abe Feder are among those who became established, in part, through their work in the Federal Theatre.
In 1936, he directed Triple-A Plowed Under on Broadway, a production of the WPA's Federal Theatre Project.

Arthur Miller

MillerA. MillerAfter the Fall
Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, John Houseman, Martin Ritt, Elia Kazan, Joseph Losey, Marc Blitzstein and Abe Feder are among those who became established, in part, through their work in the Federal Theatre.
After his graduation in 1938, he joined the Federal Theatre Project, a New Deal agency established to provide jobs in the theater.

One-Third of a Nation

play
The Living Newspapers that drew criticism were Injunction Granted, a history of American labor relations; One-Third of a Nation, about housing conditions in New York; Power, about energy from the consumer's point of view; and Triple A Plowed Under, on farming problems in America.
One Third of a Nation is a Living Newspaper play produced by the Federal Theatre Project in 1938.

Martin Ritt

director
Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, John Houseman, Martin Ritt, Elia Kazan, Joseph Losey, Marc Blitzstein and Abe Feder are among those who became established, in part, through their work in the Federal Theatre.
Ritt then went to work with the Roosevelt administration's New Deal Works Progress Administration as a playwright for the Federal Theater Project, a federal government-funded theater support program.

American Negro Theater

The project's inspiring purposes further influenced the founding within a year of the American Negro Theater, 1940 – 1949.
The group was founded by the influence of the purposes of the Negro Unit of the Federal Theatre Project in Harlem.

Voodoo Macbeth

MacbethVoodoo ''Macbeth1936 production of ''Macbeth
The most popular production was the third, which came to be called the Voodoo Macbeth (1936), director Orson Welles's adaptation of Shakespeare's play set on a mythical island suggesting the Haitian court of King Henri Christophe.
The Voodoo Macbeth is a common nickname for the Federal Theatre Project's 1936 New York production of William Shakespeare's Macbeth.

Big White Fog

Completed in 1937, it was first produced by the Negro Unit of the Chicago Federal Theatre Project in 1938 at the Great Northern Theatre in Chicago, Illinois.

Theodore Ward

His best known works are the drama Big White Fog (1938), produced by the Negro Unit of the Federal Theatre Project in Chicago as well the musical Our Lan' (1947) which premiered on Broadway at New York's Royale Theatre.

Emergency Relief Appropriation Act of 1935

Emergency Relief Appropriation Actrelief measure
Part of the Works Progress Administration, the Federal Theatre Project was a New Deal program established August 27, 1935, funded under the Emergency Relief Appropriation Act of 1935.
Of the funds appropriated by the act, $27 million was approved for the Federal Art Project, the Federal Writers' Project and the Federal Theatre Project under the WPA sponsored Federal Project Number One.

It Can't Happen Here

It '''can''' happen herenovel of the same name
Dramas criticized by Congress were American Holiday, about a small-town murder trial; Around the Corner, a Depression-era comedy; Chalk Dust, about an urban high school; Class of '29, the Depression years as seen through young college graduates; Created Equal, a review of American life since colonial times; It Can't Happen Here, Sinclair Lewis's parable of democracy and dictatorship; No More Peace, Ernst Toller's satire on dictatorships; Professor Mamlock, about Nazi persecution of Jews; Prologue to Glory, about the early life of Abraham Lincoln; The Sun and I, about Joseph in Egypt; and Woman of Destiny, about a female President who works for peace.
Starting in 1936 the WPA, a New Deal agency, performed the stage adaptation across the country; Lewis had the goal of hurting Long's chances in the 1936 election.

Elmer Rice

Judgment DayJudgement Day
Playwright and director Elmer Rice, head of the New York office of the FTP, resigned in protest and was succeeded by his assistant, Philip W. Barber.
Rice was one of the more politically outspoken dramatists of his time and took an active part in the American Civil Liberties Union, the Authors' League, the Dramatists Guild of America where he was elected as the eighth president in 1939, and P.E.N. He was the first director of the New York office of the Federal Theatre Project, but resigned in 1936 to protest government censorship of the Project's "Living Newspaper" dramatization of Mussolini's invasion of Ethiopia.

The Emperor Jones

play of the same titlethe play
The Federal Theatre Project of the Works Progress Administration launched several productions of the play in cities across the United States, including a production with marionettes in Los Angeles in 1938.

Lafayette Theatre (Harlem)

Lafayette TheatreLafayette TheaterNew Lafayette Theater
It was headquartered at the Lafayette Theatre in Harlem, where some 30 plays were presented.
It was a production of the Federal Theatre Project which was part of the Works Project Administration.

Katherine Dunham

Blue HolidayDunhamKatherine Dunham Dance Company
After successful performances of her company, Dunham was named dance director of the Chicago Negro Theater Unit of the Federal Theatre Project.