Federalist No. 10

No. 10Federalist 10Federalist Paper No. 10Federalist № 10The Federalist'' No. 10The Federalist'' paper number 10
'''Federalist No. 10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.wikipedia
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The Federalist Papers

Federalist PapersPubliusThe Federalist
10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.
Federalist No. 10 is generally regarded as the most important of the 85 articles from a philosophical perspective.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. Anti-Federalist writers began to publish essays and letters arguing against ratification, and Alexander Hamilton recruited James Madison and John Jay to write a series of pro-ratification letters in response.
Federalist No. 10, Madison's first contribution to The Federalist Papers, became highly regarded in the 20th century for its advocacy of representative democracy.

Federalist No. 9

Federalist Papers No. 99Federalist Papers'' No. 9
10 continues a theme begun in Federalist No. 9 and is titled "The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection".
The same subject is continued in the subsequent paper by James Madison, Federalist No. 10.

Direct democracy

direct democraticdirectdirect legislation
10 shows an explicit rejection by the Founding Fathers of the principles of direct democracy and factionalism, and argue that Madison suggests that a representative republic is more effective against partisanship and factionalism.
For example, James Madison, in Federalist No. 10, advocates a constitutional republic over direct democracy precisely to protect the individual from the will of the majority.

Tyranny of the majority

majoritydictatorship of the majorityparliamentary dictator
In a debate on June 26, he said that government ought to "protect the minority of the opulent against the majority" and that unchecked, democratic communities were subject to "the turbulency and weakness of unruly passions".
Constitutional author James Madison presented a similar idea in Federalist 10, citing the destabilizing effect of "the superior force of an interested and overbearing majority" on a government, though the essay as a whole focuses on the Constitution's efforts to mitigate factionalism generally.

David Hume

HumeHumeanHume, David
He also relied heavily on the philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, especially David Hume, whose influence is most clear in Madison's discussion of the types of faction and in his argument for an extended republic.
American historian Douglass Adair has argued that Hume was a major inspiration for James Madison's writings, and the essay "Federalist No. 10" in particular.

Federalist No. 51

51Federalist Paper No. 51The Federalist No. 51
10 (along with Federalist No. 51, also by Madison) was chosen as the 20th most influential document in United States history.
Factions had been further discussed in Federalist No. 10.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. Anti-Federalist writers began to publish essays and letters arguing against ratification, and Alexander Hamilton recruited James Madison and John Jay to write a series of pro-ratification letters in response.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Jurist

legal scholarlaw professorjurists
The whole series is cited by scholars and jurists as an authoritative interpretation and explication of the meaning of the Constitution.

Charles A. Beard

Charles Austin BeardCharles BeardBeard
Historians such as Charles A. Beard argue that No.

List of national founders

Founding Fathersfounding fatherfounder
10 shows an explicit rejection by the Founding Fathers of the principles of direct democracy and factionalism, and argue that Madison suggests that a representative republic is more effective against partisanship and factionalism.

Representative democracy

elected representativerepresentative democraticparliamentary democracy
10 shows an explicit rejection by the Founding Fathers of the principles of direct democracy and factionalism, and argue that Madison suggests that a representative republic is more effective against partisanship and factionalism.

Partisan (politics)

partisanpartisanshipmulti-partisan
10 shows an explicit rejection by the Founding Fathers of the principles of direct democracy and factionalism, and argue that Madison suggests that a representative republic is more effective against partisanship and factionalism.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
Prior to the Constitution, the thirteen states were bound together by the Articles of Confederation.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
These were, in essence, a military alliance between sovereign nations adopted to better fight the Revolutionary War.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Madison, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and others feared a break-up of the union and national bankruptcy.

Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Madison, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and others feared a break-up of the union and national bankruptcy.

Shays' Rebellion

Shays's RebellionShays RebellionShays’ Rebellion
In this view, Shays' Rebellion, an armed uprising in Massachusetts in 1786, was simply one, albeit extreme, example of "democratic excess" in the aftermath of the War.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
A national convention was called for May 1787, to revise the Articles of Confederation.

Article Seven of the United States Constitution

Article SevenArticle VIIMassachusetts' ratification
By its own Article Seven, the constitution drafted by the convention needed ratification by at least nine of the thirteen states, through special conventions held in each state.

John Jay

Chief Justice John JayJayfirst Chief Justice of the United States
Anti-Federalist writers began to publish essays and letters arguing against ratification, and Alexander Hamilton recruited James Madison and John Jay to write a series of pro-ratification letters in response.

Federalist No. 37

37
Federalist No. 37, also by Madison, was the only other essay to appear first in the Advertiser.

Pennsylvania Gazette

The Pennsylvania Gazette
Outside New York City, it made four appearances in early 1788: January 2 in the Pennsylvania Gazette, January 10 in the Hudson Valley Weekly, January 15 in the Lansingburgh Northern Centinel, and January 17 in the Albany Gazette.

Political faction

factionfactionsfactionalism
Hamilton there addressed the destructive role of a faction in breaking apart the republic.