Felix Bloch

BlochBloch, FelixF. Bloch
Felix Bloch (23 October 1905 – 10 September 1983) was a Swiss-American physicist and Nobel physics laureate who worked mainly in the U.S.wikipedia
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CERN

European Organization for Nuclear ResearchEuropean Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)European Laboratory for Particle Physics
In 1954–1955, he served for one year as the first Director-General of CERN.
Edoardo Amaldi was the general secretary of CERN at its early stages when operations were still provisional, while the first Director-General (1954) was Felix Bloch.

Edward Mills Purcell

Edward PurcellEdward M. PurcellPurcell
Felix Bloch (23 October 1905 – 10 September 1983) was a Swiss-American physicist and Nobel physics laureate who worked mainly in the U.S. He and Edward Mills Purcell were awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for "their development of new ways and methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements."
For his discovery of NMR, Purcell shared the 1952 Nobel Prize in physics with Felix Bloch of Stanford University.

Werner Heisenberg

HeisenbergW. HeisenbergHeisenberg, Werner
Bloch graduated in 1927, and was encouraged by Debye to go to Leipzig to study with Werner Heisenberg.
At various times they included Erich Bagge, Felix Bloch, Ugo Fano, Siegfried Flügge, William Vermillion Houston, Friedrich Hund, Robert S. Mulliken, Rudolf Peierls, George Placzek, Isidor Isaac Rabi, Fritz Sauter, John C. Slater, Edward Teller, John Hasbrouck van Vleck, Victor Frederick Weisskopf, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker, Gregor Wentzel, and Clarence Zener.

ETH Zurich

ETH ZürichSwiss Federal Institute of TechnologyETH
He was educated at the Cantonal Gymnasium in Zürich and at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETHZ), also in Zürich.

John von Neumann

von NeumannJ. von NeumannNeumann, John von
A fellow student in these seminars was John von Neumann.
The formalism of density operators and matrices was introduced by von Neumann in 1927 and independently, but less systematically by Lev Landau and Felix Bloch in 1927 and 1946 respectively.

Leipzig University

University of LeipzigLeipzigKarl Marx University
Bloch graduated in 1927, and was encouraged by Debye to go to Leipzig to study with Werner Heisenberg.

Manhattan Project

Manhattan Engineer DistrictThe Manhattan ProjectManhattan District
During WWII, Bloch briefly worked on the atomic bomb project at Los Alamos.
To review this work and the general theory of fission reactions, Oppenheimer and Fermi convened meetings at the University of Chicago in June and at the University of California in July 1942 with theoretical physicists Hans Bethe, John Van Vleck, Edward Teller, Emil Konopinski, Robert Serber, Stan Frankel, and Eldred C. Nelson, the latter three former students of Oppenheimer, and experimental physicists Emilio Segrè, Felix Bloch, Franco Rasetti, John Henry Manley, and Edwin McMillan.

Stanford University

StanfordLeland Stanford Junior UniversityUniversity of Stanford
In 1934, the chairman of Stanford Physics invited Bloch to join the faculty.

Niels Bohr

BohrNiels Henrik David BohrBohr, Niels
He remained in European academia, working on superconductivity with Wolfgang Pauli in Zürich; with Hans Kramers and Adriaan Fokker in Holland; with Heisenberg on ferromagnetism, where he developed a description of boundaries between magnetic domains, now known as "Bloch walls"; with Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, where he worked on a theoretical description of the stopping of charged particles traveling through matter; and with Enrico Fermi in Rome.
Those that he helped included Guido Beck, Felix Bloch, James Franck, George de Hevesy, Otto Frisch, Hilde Levi, Lise Meitner, George Placzek, Eugene Rabinowitch, Stefan Rozental, Erich Ernst Schneider, Edward Teller, Arthur von Hippel and Victor Weisskopf.

Bloch equations

Bloch equation
In 1946 he proposed the Bloch equations which determine the time evolution of nuclear magnetization.
These are phenomenological equations that were introduced by Felix Bloch in 1946.

Bloch wave

Bloch's theoremBloch theoremBloch electron
His doctoral thesis established the quantum theory of solids, using Bloch waves to describe electrons in periodic lattices.
A Bloch wave (also called Bloch state or Bloch function or Bloch wavefunction), named after Swiss physicist Felix Bloch, is a wave composed by a plane wave anche by a periodic function.

Nuclear magnetic resonance

NMRmagnetic resonanceNuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)
After the war, he concentrated on investigations into nuclear induction and nuclear magnetic resonance, which are the underlying principles of MRI.
In 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Mills Purcell expanded the technique for use on liquids and solids, for which they shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1952.

Bloch sphere

Bloch vectorBloch pointBloch representation
In quantum mechanics, the Bloch sphere is a geometrical representation of the pure state space of a two-level quantum mechanical system (qubit), named after the physicist Felix Bloch.

Magnon

paramagnon
The concept of a magnon was introduced in 1930 by Felix Bloch in order to explain the reduction of the spontaneous magnetization in a ferromagnet.

List of Jewish Nobel laureates

Jewish Nobel laureatesJewish Nobel Prize winnersJews have won

Carson D. Jeffries

At Stanford, he was the advisor of Carson D. Jeffries, who became a professor of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley.
Jeffries graduated from Louisiana State University in 1943 with a B.S. degree, and received his doctorate from Stanford University in 1951 where his advisor was Felix Bloch.

Domain wall (magnetism)

domain wallBloch walldomain walls
He remained in European academia, working on superconductivity with Wolfgang Pauli in Zürich; with Hans Kramers and Adriaan Fokker in Holland; with Heisenberg on ferromagnetism, where he developed a description of boundaries between magnetic domains, now known as "Bloch walls"; with Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, where he worked on a theoretical description of the stopping of charged particles traveling through matter; and with Enrico Fermi in Rome.
A Bloch wall is a narrow transition region at the boundary between magnetic domains, over which the magnetization changes from its value in one domain to that in the next, named after the physicist Felix Bloch.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Felix Bloch (23 October 1905 – 10 September 1983) was a Swiss-American physicist and Nobel physics laureate who worked mainly in the U.S. He and Edward Mills Purcell were awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for "their development of new ways and methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements."

Physicist

physicistsresearch physicistengineer and physicist
Felix Bloch (23 October 1905 – 10 September 1983) was a Swiss-American physicist and Nobel physics laureate who worked mainly in the U.S. He and Edward Mills Purcell were awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for "their development of new ways and methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements."

Zürich

ZurichZürich, SwitzerlandZurich, Switzerland
Bloch was born in Zürich, Switzerland to Jewish parents Gustav and Agnes Bloch.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Bloch was born in Zürich, Switzerland to Jewish parents Gustav and Agnes Bloch.

Physics

physicistphysicalphysicists
Initially studying engineering he soon changed to physics.

Peter Debye

Peter J. W. DebyeDebyePeter J.W. Debye
During this time he attended lectures and seminars given by Peter Debye and Hermann Weyl at ETH Zürich and Erwin Schrödinger at the neighboring University of Zürich.

Hermann Weyl

WeylH. WeylHermann Klaus Hugo Weyl
During this time he attended lectures and seminars given by Peter Debye and Hermann Weyl at ETH Zürich and Erwin Schrödinger at the neighboring University of Zürich.

Erwin Schrödinger

SchrödingerErwin SchroedingerErwin Schrodinger
During this time he attended lectures and seminars given by Peter Debye and Hermann Weyl at ETH Zürich and Erwin Schrödinger at the neighboring University of Zürich.