A report on Fellow of the Royal Society

Headquarters of the Royal Society in Carlton House Terrace in London
Isaac Newton was one of the earliest fellows of the Royal Society, elected in 1672.
Stephen Hawking was elected a fellow in 1974
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Bill Bryson was elected an Honorary Member in 2013
David Attenborough was elected a fellow in 1983, under former statute 12
Brian Cox, a professor of physics, was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 2016 having previously held a Royal Society University Research Fellowship (URF) from 2005 to 2013

Award granted by the judges of the Royal Society of London to individuals who have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science".

- Fellow of the Royal Society
Headquarters of the Royal Society in Carlton House Terrace in London

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Coat of arms of the Royal Society

Royal Society

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Learned society and the United Kingdom's national academy of sciences.

Learned society and the United Kingdom's national academy of sciences.

Coat of arms of the Royal Society
Entrance to the Royal Society at 6–9 Carlton House Terrace, London
John Evelyn, who helped to found the Royal Society.
Mace granted by Charles II.
Sir Isaac Newton FRS, President of Royal Society, 1703–1727. Newton was one of the earliest Fellows of the Royal Society, elected in 1672.
Lord Hardwicke, leader of the "Hardwicke Circle" that dominated society politics during the 1750s and '60s
Burlington House, where the Society was based between 1873 and 1967
The coat of arms of the Royal Society
J. J. Thomson was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1884.
Stephen Hawking was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974.
The Royal Society Collections at the University of London History Day, 2019.
The current premises of the Royal Society, 6–9 Carlton House Terrace, London (first four properties only)
Title page of the first edition of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society published in 1665

As of 2020, there are about 1,700 fellows, allowed to use the postnominal title FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society), with up to 52 new fellows appointed each year.

Dorothy Hodgkin

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Nobel Prize-winning British chemist who advanced the technique of X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of biomolecules, which became essential for structural biology.

Nobel Prize-winning British chemist who advanced the technique of X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of biomolecules, which became essential for structural biology.

Model of the structure of penicillin, by Hodgkin, Oxford, c. 1945
Molecular model of penicillin by Hodgkin, c. 1945
Molecular structure of vitamin B12, as established by Hodgkin
Order of Merit insignia of Dorothy Hodgkin, displayed in the Royal Society, London

By then she had been married for 12 years, given birth to three children and been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS).

Fellow

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Broad concept whose exact meaning depends on context.

Broad concept whose exact meaning depends on context.

Fellowships of this type can be awarded as a title of honor in their own right, e.g. the Fellowship of the Royal Society (FRS).

The Zirkel of a German Student Corps. This symbol captures the letters "v, c, f, A", as post-nominal for that fraternity.

Post-nominal letters

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Member of a religious institute or fraternity.

Member of a religious institute or fraternity.

The Zirkel of a German Student Corps. This symbol captures the letters "v, c, f, A", as post-nominal for that fraternity.

Only postnominals indicating honorific fellowships (e.g., FRS, FBA, FREng) are normally used socially.

Onora O'Neill

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British philosopher and a crossbench member of the House of Lords.

British philosopher and a crossbench member of the House of Lords.

In 1999, she was created a life peer as Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve, of The Braid in the County of Antrim, and in 2007 was elected an Honorary FRS.

Srinivasa Ramanujan

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Indian mathematician who lived during the British Rule in India. Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions, including solutions to mathematical problems then considered unsolvable.

Indian mathematician who lived during the British Rule in India. Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions, including solutions to mathematical problems then considered unsolvable.

Ramanujan's birthplace on 18 Alahiri Street, Erode, now in Tamil Nadu
Ramanujan's home on Sarangapani Sannidhi Street, Kumbakonam
Ramanujan (centre) and his colleague G. H. Hardy (rightmost), with other scientists, outside the Senate House, Cambridge, c.1914–19
Whewell's Court, Trinity College, Cambridge
Bust of Ramanujan in the garden of in Kolkata, India
The 2012 Indian stamp dedicated to the National Mathematics Day and featuring Ramanujan
Ramanujan on stamp of India (2011)

He became one of the youngest Fellows of the Royal Society and only the second Indian member, and the first Indian to be elected a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

At NASA's StarChild Learning Center, c. 1980s

Stephen Hawking

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English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author who, at the time of his death, was director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge.

English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author who, at the time of his death, was director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge.

At NASA's StarChild Learning Center, c. 1980s
Stephen Hawking in 1966
Hawking at an ALS convention in San Francisco in the 1980s
Hawking with string theorists David Gross and Edward Witten at the Strings Conference in January 2001, TIFR, India
Hawking at the Bibliothèque nationale de France to inaugurate the Laboratory of Astronomy and Particles in Paris, and the French release of his work God Created the Integers, 5 May 2006
Hawking with University of Oxford librarian Richard Ovenden (left) and naturalist David Attenborough (right) at the opening of the Weston Library, Oxford, in March 2015. Ovenden awarded the Bodley Medal to Hawking and Attenborough at the ceremony.
Hawking holding a public lecture at the Stockholm Waterfront congress centre, 24 August 2015
Hawking taking a zero-gravity flight in a reduced-gravity aircraft, April 2007
Stephen Hawking's memorial stone in Westminster Abbey
President Barack Obama talks with Hawking in the White House before a ceremony presenting him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom on 12 August 2009
Hawking in Monty Python's “Galaxy Song” video at the comedy troupe's 2014 reunion show, Monty Python Live (Mostly)
Hawking being presented by his daughter Lucy Hawking at the lecture he gave for NASA's 50th anniversary, 2008
The Blackboard from Hawking's Office on display in the Science Museum

Hawking was a Fellow of the Royal Society, a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

Faraday c. undefined 1857

Michael Faraday

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English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.

English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.

Faraday c. undefined 1857
Portrait of Faraday in his late thirties, ca. 1826
Michael Faraday, c. 1861, aged about 70
Three Fellows of the Royal Society offering the presidency to Faraday, 1857
Michael Faraday's grave at Highgate Cemetery, London
Equipment used by Faraday to make glass on display at the Royal Institution in London
Electromagnetic rotation experiment of Faraday, ca. 1821
One of Faraday's 1831 experiments demonstrating induction. The liquid battery (right) sends an electric current through the small coil (A). When it is moved in or out of the large coil (B), its magnetic field induces a momentary voltage in the coil, which is detected by the galvanometer (G).
A diagram of Faraday's iron ring-coil apparatus
Built in 1831, the Faraday disk was the first electric generator. The horseshoe-shaped magnet (A) created a magnetic field through the disk (D). When the disk was turned, this induced an electric current radially outward from the center toward the rim. The current flowed out through the sliding spring contact m, through the external circuit, and back into the center of the disk through the axle.
Faraday (right) and John Daniell (left), founders of electrochemistry.
Faraday holding a type of glass bar he used in 1845 to show magnetism affects light in dielectric material.
Michael Faraday meets Father Thames, from Punch (21 July 1855)
Lighthouse lantern room from mid-1800s
Faraday's apparatus for experimental demonstration of ideomotor effect on table-turning
Faraday delivering a Christmas Lecture at the Royal Institution in 1856.
Statue of Faraday in Savoy Place, London. Sculptor John Henry Foley RA.
Plaque erected in 1876 by the Royal Society of Arts at 48 Blandford Street, Marylebone, London
Chemische Manipulation, 1828
Michael Faraday in his laboratory, c. 1850s.
Michael Faraday's study at the Royal Institution.
Michael Faraday's flat at the Royal Institution.
Artist Harriet Jane Moore who documented Faraday's life in watercolours.
Portrait of Faraday in 1842 by Thomas Phillips

Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1824, he twice refused to become President.

Robin Saxby in 2015, portrait via the Royal Society

Robin Saxby

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Robin Saxby in 2015, portrait via the Royal Society

Sir Robin Keith Saxby FREng HonFRS (born 4 February 1947) is an English engineer who was chief executive and then chairman of ARM Holdings, which he built to become a dominant supplier of embedded systems.

Subhash Khot

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Indian-American mathematician and theoretical computer scientist who is the Julius Silver Professor of Computer Science in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.

Indian-American mathematician and theoretical computer scientist who is the Julius Silver Professor of Computer Science in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.

He received the MacArthur Fellowship in 2016 and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2017.