Marcos in 1982 during a ceremony
Ferdinand Marcos (right) with his family in the 1920s
Location of the Philippines in Southeast Asia.
Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos with Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson during a visit to the United States.
Ferdinand Marcos being conferred with a Doctor Laws, honoris causa degree during the investiture of the first Filipino president of Central Philippine University, Rex. D. Drilon, on April 21, 1967.
Location of the Philippines in Southeast Asia.
Ferdinand Marcos as a soldier in the 1940s
Ferdinand Marcos, president from 1965 to 1986.
Ferdinand Marcos is sworn into his first term on December 30, 1965.
The leaders of some of the SEATO nations in front of the Congress Building in Manila, hosted by Marcos on October 24, 1966
President Marcos (left) and his wife Imelda (center) meet with US President Lyndon B. Johnson (right) in Manila in October 1966.
Marcos with Japanese Emperor Hirohito in 1966
Ferdinand Marcos takes the Oath of Office for a second term before Chief Justice Roberto Concepcion on December 30, 1969.
Richard Nixon with the Marcos family in 1969
September 24, 1972, issue of the Sunday edition of the Philippine Daily Express
Imperial Japanese Army soldier Hiroo Onoda offering his military sword to Marcos on the day of his surrender on March 11, 1974
Ferdinand Marcos with US Secretary of State George Shultz, 1982
President Ferdinand E. Marcos in Washington in 1983
Marcos at the North–South Summit on International Cooperation and Development in Cancun alongside other world leaders including I. Gandhi, F. Mitterrand, R. Reagan, M. Thatcher, K. Waldheim, Zhao Ziyang; October 23, 1981
Corazon Aquino, widow of the assassinated opposition leader Benigno Aquino Jr., takes the Oath of Office on February 25, 1986
Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at the White House with US President Ronald Reagan in 1982
The body of Ferdinand Marcos was stored in a refrigerated crypt at the Ferdinand E. Marcos Presidential Center in Batac, Ilocos Norte until 2016.
Students of the Ateneo de Manila University along Katipunan Avenue protesting against the burial of Marcos insisting that the former president is not a hero, but a dictator
Ferdinand Marcos in Washington, 1983
A 1999 view of the San Fernando segment of North Luzon Expressway, one of Marcos's infrastructure projects
San Juanico Bridge connecting Leyte and Samar
Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos with the Johnsons in 1966
Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos with the Nixons in 1969
Marcos greeting Robert Muldoon on the latter's official visit to the Philippines, 1980. New Zealand was a valuable strategic partner for the country in the last years of Marcos' rule.

Ferdinand Emmanuel Edralin Marcos Sr. (, ; September 11, 1917 – September 28, 1989) was a Filipino politician, lawyer, dictator, and kleptocrat who was the 10th president of the Philippines from 1965 to 1986.

- Ferdinand Marcos

The history of the Philippines, from 1965 to 1986, covers the presidency of Ferdinand Marcos.

- History of the Philippines (1965–1986)
Marcos in 1982 during a ceremony

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Aquino in 1986

Corazon Aquino

Filipina politician who served as the 11th president of the Philippines from 1986 to 1992.

Filipina politician who served as the 11th president of the Philippines from 1986 to 1992.

Aquino in 1986
Corazon Aquino taking the oath of office before Chief Justice Claudio Teehankee Sr. in Club Filipino, San Juan on 25 February 1986
Corazon Aquino during a ceremony honoring the United States Air Force.
President Corazon Aquino with U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle participate in the Veterans' Day Service at Arlington National Cemetery on 10 November 1989.
President Aquino holds talks with the officials from the International Rice Research Institute.
President Corazon Aquino addresses base workers at a rally at Remy Field concerning jobs for Filipino workers after the Americans withdraw from the U.S. facilities.
Corazon Aquino speaking before the 2003 Ninoy Aquino Award ceremony at the U.S. Embassy in Manila.
Queue for Aquino's wake in front of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila campus, which had opened its facilities including a clinic and restrooms for the mourners. The cross topping the dome of Manila Cathedral is visible in the upper right of the photo.
The grave of Corazon and Ninoy Aquino photographed on 8 August 2009, a week after Corazon Aquino's death. Corazon Aquino shares a gravestone with her husband Ninoy Aquino at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque, Philippines. Their son, Benigno III, was later interred beside their graves upon his death in June 2021.
Cory Aquino memorial at General Tinio, Nueva Ecija

She was the most prominent figure of the 1986 People Power Revolution, which ended the two-decade rule of President Ferdinand Marcos and led to the establishment of the current democratic Fifth Philippine Republic.

Enrile in March 2017

Juan Ponce Enrile

Enrile in March 2017
Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile with President Ferdinand Marcos.
"FM Declares Martial Law"—the headline of the September 24, 1972 issue of the Sunday Express, which was the Sunday edition of the Philippines Daily Express. The Daily Express was the only newspaper allowed to circulate upon the declaration of Martial Law.
Juan Ponce Enrile's bullet-riddled car
Enrile in 1987.
with Hajime Ishii (left) on May 4, 2011
Enrile with Senators Jinggoy Estrada (left) and Bong Revilla (center) after Revilla's Privilege Speech at the Senate floor on June 9, 2014
Enrile promoting his autobiography

Juan Valentin Furagganan Ponce Enrile Sr., (born Juanito Furagganan; February 14, 1924), also referred to by his initials JPE, is a Filipino politician and lawyer known for his role in the administration of Philippine Dictator Ferdinand Marcos; his role in the failed coup that helped hasten the 1986 People Power Revolution and the ouster of Marcos; and his tenure in the Philippine legislature in the years after the revolution.

Enrile was a protégé of President Ferdinand Marcos and served as Justice Secretary and Defense Minister during the Marcos administration.

Ramos in April 1998, 2 months before the end of his term

Fidel V. Ramos

Retired Filipino general and politician who served as the 12th president of the Philippines from 1992 to 1998.

Retired Filipino general and politician who served as the 12th president of the Philippines from 1992 to 1998.

Ramos in April 1998, 2 months before the end of his term
Rented family house of Narciso Ramos and Angela Valdez in Lingayen, where Fidel and Leticia Ramos-Shahani were born
Chief of Indonesian National Police Lieutenant General Awaloedin Djamin received an honorary visit by Chief of Philippine Constabulary Maj. Gen. Fidel V. Ramos, AFP (left), December 1979
Former Secretary of National Defense Fidel V. Ramos taking his oath of office as the 12th president of the Philippines on June 30, 1992.
President Fidel V. Ramos troops the honor guards at the Pentagon with Secretary of Defense William Cohen during a state visit in 1998.
Ramos, then-Philippine Special Envoy to China, briefs President Rodrigo Duterte and the cabinet.
Then-BOAO Forum for Asia Chairman Ramos with former Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke (right), and Syed Abul Hossain (center).
Ramos House marker

He rose the ranks in the Philippine military early in his career and became Chief of the Philippine Constabulary and Vice Chief-of-Staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines during the term of President Ferdinand Marcos.

On 25 February, the "EDSA Revolution" reached its peak when Marcos, along with his family and some supporters, fled into exile in Hawaii with the assistance of the United States government, ending his 20-year rule, leaving Aquino to accede as the country's first female President.

1986 Philippine presidential election

The 1986 Philippine presidential and vice presidential elections were held on February 7, 1986.

The 1986 Philippine presidential and vice presidential elections were held on February 7, 1986.

Popularly known as the 1986 snap election, it is among the landmark events that led up to the People Power Revolution, the downfall of the presidency of Ferdinand Marcos, and the accession of Corazon C. Aquino as president.

After being dared by an American journalist, President Ferdinand E. Marcos declared a snap election during an interview on the American Broadcasting Company political affairs programme, This Week with David Brinkley in November 1985.

Logo since 2021

Liberal Party (Philippines)

Liberal political party in the Philippines.

Liberal political party in the Philippines.

Logo since 2021

As a vocal opposition party to the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, it reemerged as a major political party after the People Power Revolution and the establishment of the Fifth Republic.

Salvador Laurel

Filipino lawyer and politician who served as the vice president of the Philippines from 1986 to 1992 under President Corazon Aquino and briefly served as the last prime minister from February 25 to March 25, 1986, when the position was abolished.

Filipino lawyer and politician who served as the vice president of the Philippines from 1986 to 1992 under President Corazon Aquino and briefly served as the last prime minister from February 25 to March 25, 1986, when the position was abolished.

Laurel's cremains are interred at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

He was a major leader of the United Nationalist Democratic Organization (UNIDO), the political party that helped topple the dictatorship of President Ferdinand Marcos with the 1986 People Power Revolution.

Kilusang Bagong Lipunan

Right-wing to far-right political party in the Philippines.

Right-wing to far-right political party in the Philippines.

Former logo of KBL

It was first formed in 1978 as an umbrella coalition of parties supporting then-President Ferdinand E. Marcos for the Interim Batasang Pambansa (the unicameral parliament) and was his political vehicle during his 21-year regime.

National Historical Commission of the Philippines' historical marker commemorating Plaza Miranda; unveiled on the 50th anniversary of the Plaza Miranda bombing.

Plaza Miranda

Public square bounded by Quezon Boulevard, Hidalgo Street and Evangelista Street in Quiapo, Manila.

Public square bounded by Quezon Boulevard, Hidalgo Street and Evangelista Street in Quiapo, Manila.

National Historical Commission of the Philippines' historical marker commemorating Plaza Miranda; unveiled on the 50th anniversary of the Plaza Miranda bombing.
The top of the Obelisk in Plaza Miranda.
The facade of Quiapo Church, looms over the plaza.

Regarded as the center of Philippine political discourse prior to the imposition of martial law in 1972, the plaza was the site of the 1971 Plaza Miranda bombing, where two grenades were launched at a political rally of the Liberal Party, killing nine people.

It later became the venue of the Movement of Concerned Citizens for Civil Liberties (MCCCL) rally led by Sen. Jose W. Diokno on September 21, 1972, where 50,000 people gathered together to protest the impending martial law declaration of the Marcos dictatorship.