Fertility

fertilemale fertilityfemale fertilityhuman fertilitysexually fertileable to bear childrenantifertility actionbegetting of childrenBongaarts' model of components of fertilityChild-woman ratio
Fertility is the natural capability to produce offspring.wikipedia
820 Related Articles

Fertility and intelligence

intelligencehaving more childrenlow IQ
Factors generally associated with decreased fertility include wealth, education, female labor participation, urban residence, cost of housing, intelligence, increased female age and (to a lesser degree) increased male age.
There is evidence that, on a population level, intelligence is negatively correlated with fertility rate and positively correlated with survival rate of offspring.

Down syndrome

Down's syndrometrisomy 21Downs Syndrome
According to the March of Dimes, "At age 25, your risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is 1 in 1,340. At age 30, your risk is 1 in 940. At age 35, your risk is 1 in 353. At age 40, your risk is 1 in 85. At age 45, your risk is 1 in 35."
Males with Down syndrome usually do not father children, while females have lower rates of fertility relative to those who are unaffected.

Family planning

family-planningeducation and accessfamily planning clinic
Fertility awareness refers to a set of practices used to determine the fertile and infertile phases of a woman's menstrual cycle.

Ansley J. Coale

CoaleAnsley CoaleCoale, Ansley J.
These model life tables both established new empirical regularities, and proved invaluable in the development of later techniques for estimating mortality and fertility in populations with inaccurate or incomplete data.

Review of Economics of the Household

Household decisions analyzed in this journal include consumption, savings, labor supply and other time uses, marriage and divorce, demand for health and other forms of human capital, fertility and investment in children's human capital, households and environmental economics, economics of migration, and economics of religion.

Gamete

gametesgameticreproductive cells
Fertility differs from fecundity, which is defined as the potential for reproduction (influenced by gamete production, fertilization and carrying a pregnancy to term).

Nutrition

nutrition sciencenutritionalnutritional science
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Human sexual activity

sexual activitysexual behaviorsex
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Consanguinity

consanguineousblood relativeconsanguine
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Culture

culturalculturesculturally
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Instinct

instinctsanimal instinctinstinctive
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Emotion

emotionsemotionalemotional state
Human fertility depends on factors of nutrition, sexual behavior, consanguinity, culture, instinct, endocrinology, timing, economics, way of life, and emotions.

Cohort (statistics)

cohortcohortsage cohort
Demographers measure the fertility rate in a variety of ways, which can be broadly broken into "period" measures and "cohort" measures.

Religiosity

religious valuesreligious commitmentreligiousness
Factors generally associated with increased fertility include religiosity, intention to have children, and maternal support.

Women in the workforce

women in the workplacefemale employmentfemale labor participation
Factors generally associated with decreased fertility include wealth, education, female labor participation, urban residence, cost of housing, intelligence, increased female age and (to a lesser degree) increased male age.

Urban area

Urbanurban agglomerationagglomeration
Factors generally associated with decreased fertility include wealth, education, female labor participation, urban residence, cost of housing, intelligence, increased female age and (to a lesser degree) increased male age.

Paternal age effect

paternal ageAdvanced paternal ageincreased male age
Factors generally associated with decreased fertility include wealth, education, female labor participation, urban residence, cost of housing, intelligence, increased female age and (to a lesser degree) increased male age.

Gary Becker

Gary S. BeckerNew Home EconomicsBecker
The "Three-step Analysis" of the fertility process was introduced by Kingsley Davis and Judith Blake in 1956 and makes use of three proximate determinants: The economic analysis of fertility is part of household economics, a field that has grown out of the New Home Economics.

Richard Easterlin

Richard A. EasterlinEasterlinEasterlin, Richard A.
Influential economic analyses of fertility include Becker (1960), Mincer (1963), and Easterlin (1969).

Easterlin hypothesis

Easterlin
The latter developed the Easterlin hypothesis to account for the Baby Boom.