Fertilizer

fertiliserfertilizersnitrogen fertilizerchemical fertilizerfertilisersfertilizationartificial fertilizerchemical fertilizerssynthetic fertilizersfertilized
A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; [[American and British English spelling differences#-ise, -ize (-isation, -ization)|see spelling differences]]) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.wikipedia
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Plant nutrition

nutrientsplant nutrientsnutrient
A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; [[American and British English spelling differences#-ise, -ize (-isation, -ization)|see spelling differences]]) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.
Most soil conditions across the world can provide plants adapted to that climate and soil with sufficient nutrition for a complete life cycle, without the addition of nutrients as fertilizer.

Ammonia

NH 3 anhydrous ammonialiquid ammonia
Only some bacteria and their host plants (notably legumes) can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N 2 ) by converting it to ammonia.
It is a common nitrogenous waste, particularly among aquatic organisms, and it contributes significantly to the nutritional needs of terrestrial organisms by serving as a precursor to food and fertilizers.

Phosphorus

PP 4 phosphoric
Phosphorus (P): Development of roots, flowers, seeds, fruit;
The vast majority of phosphorus compounds mined are consumed as fertilisers.

Sulfur

sulphurSbrimstone
three secondary macronutrients: calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S);
The greatest commercial use of the element is the production of sulfuric acid for sulfate and phosphate fertilizers, and other chemical processes.

Nitrogen

NN 2 dinitrogen
Nitrogen (N): leaf growth
Synthetically produced ammonia and nitrates are key industrial fertilisers, and fertiliser nitrates are key pollutants in the eutrophication of water systems.

Boron

Bboron-10 10 B
micronutrients: copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), boron (B). Of occasional significance are silicon (Si), cobalt (Co), and vanadium (V).
Boron is an essential plant nutrient and boron compounds such as borax and boric acid are used as fertilizers in agriculture, although it only required in small amounts, with excess being toxic.

Urea

carbamideCO(NH 2 ) 2 urea spraying systems
Urea is another popular source of nitrogen, having the advantage that it is solid and non-explosive, unlike ammonia and ammonium nitrate, respectively.
Urea is widely used in fertilizers as a source of nitrogen and is an important raw material for the chemical industry.

Ammonium nitrate

ammonia nitrateANNH 4 NO 3
Ammonium nitrate (NH 4 ) is also widely used.
It is predominantly used in agriculture as a high-nitrogen fertilizer.

Calcium ammonium nitrate

A few percent of the nitrogen fertilizer market (4% in 2007) has been met by calcium ammonium nitrate (Ca 2 · NH 4 NO 3 ).
Calcium ammonium nitrate or CAN, also known as nitro-limestone or nitrochalk, is a widely used inorganic fertilizer, accounting for 4% of all nitrogen fertilizer used worldwide in 2007.

Phosphogypsum

"Single superphosphate" (SSP) consists of 14–18% P 2 O 5, again in the form of Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2, but also phosphogypsum (Ca).
Phosphogypsum refers to the calcium sulfate hydrate formed as a by-product of the production of fertilizer from phosphate rock.

Chelation

chelatechelatingchelating agent
For this reason, iron is often administered as a chelate complex, e.g., the EDTA derivative.
Chelation is useful in applications such as providing nutritional supplements, in chelation therapy to remove toxic metals from the body, as contrast agents in MRI scanning, in manufacturing using homogeneous catalysts, in chemical water treatment to assist in the removal of metals, and in fertilizers.

Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate

monoammonium phosphateNH 4 H 2 PO 4
The main NP fertilizers are monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP).
ADP is a major ingredient of agricultural fertilizers and some fire extinguishers.

Haber process

Haber-Bosch processsynthesis of ammoniaHaber-Bosch
The ammonia is produced by the Haber-Bosch process.
Although the Haber process is mainly used to produce fertilizer today, during World War I it provided Germany with a source of ammonia for the production of explosives, compensating for the Allied Powers' trade blockade on Chilean saltpeter.

Plant

plantsfloraplant kingdom
A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; [[American and British English spelling differences#-ise, -ize (-isation, -ization)|see spelling differences]]) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.
Ant wastes provide organic fertilizer.

Sodium nitrate

saltpeterNaNO 3 saltpetre
Deposits of sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) (Chilean saltpeter) are also found in the Atacama desert in Chile and was one of the original (1830) nitrogen-rich fertilizers used.
It is a readily available source of the nitrate anion (NO 3 − ), which is useful in several reactions carried out on industrial scales for the production of fertilizers, pyrotechnics and smoke bombs, glass and pottery enamels, food preservatives (esp.

Sulfuric acid

sulphuric acidsulfuricH 2 SO 4
These minerals are converted to water-soluble phosphate salts by treatment with sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) or phosphoric acids (H 3 PO 4 ).
Principal uses include fertilizer manufacturing (and other mineral processing), oil refining, wastewater processing, and chemical synthesis.

Nitrophosphate process

Odda processnitrophosphateproducing nitrophosphate
In the nitrophosphate process or Odda process (invented in 1927), phosphate rock with up to a 20% phosphorus (P) content is dissolved with nitric acid (HNO 3 ) to produce a mixture of phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3 ) 2 ).
The nitrophosphate process (also known as the Odda process) was a method for the industrial production of nitrogen fertilizers invented by Erling Johnson in the municipality of Odda, Norway around 1927.

Potash

pearl ashPot Ashpotassium salt
Potash is a mixture of potassium minerals used to make potassium (chemical symbol: K) fertilizers.
Potash is produced worldwide at amounts exceeding 90 million tonnes (40 million tonnes K 2 O equivalent) per year, mostly for use in manufacturing.

Organic fertilizer

fertilizergarden fertiliserLiquid manure fertilizer
“Organic fertilizers” can describe those fertilizers with an organic — biologic — origin—that is, fertilizers derived from living or formerly living materials.
Organic fertilizers are fertilizers derived from animal matter, animal excreta (manure), human excreta, and vegetable matter (e.g. compost and crop residues).

Diammonium phosphate

(NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 DAPyeast nutrient
The main NP fertilizers are monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP).
DAP is used as a fertilizer.

Monocalcium phosphate

superphosphatesuper phosphateTriple Super Phosphate
The main straight phosphate fertilizers are the superphosphates.
Several million tons are produced annually for use as fertilizers.

Potassium sulfate

potassium sulphateK 2 SO 4 sulfate of potash
In fact potash fertilizers are usually potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, potassium carbonate, or potassium nitrate.
It is commonly used in fertilizers, providing both potassium and a source of sulfur.

Organic farming

organicorganic agricultureorganic farm
Organic fertilizers can also describe commercially available and frequently packaged products that strive to follow the expectations and restrictions adopted by “organic agriculture” and ”environmentally friendly" gardening — related systems of food and plant production that significantly limit or strictly avoid the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. The “organic fertilizer” products typically contain both some organic materials as well as acceptable additives such as nutritive rock powders, ground sea shells (crab, oyster, etc.), other prepared products such as seed meal or kelp, and cultivated microorganisms and derivatives.
For instance, naturally occurring pesticides such as pyrethrin and rotenone are permitted, while synthetic fertilizers and pesticides are generally prohibited.

Potassium nitrate

saltpetersaltpetreKNO 3
In fact potash fertilizers are usually potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, potassium carbonate, or potassium nitrate.
Major uses of potassium nitrate are in fertilizers, tree stump removal, rocket propellants and fireworks.

Calcium nitrate

Ca(NO 3 ) 2 calciumsaltpetre
In the nitrophosphate process or Odda process (invented in 1927), phosphate rock with up to a 20% phosphorus (P) content is dissolved with nitric acid (HNO 3 ) to produce a mixture of phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) and calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3 ) 2 ).
It is mainly used as a component in fertilizers but has other applications.