Fibrosis

fibroticscarringfibrogenicfibrogenesisfibrousantifibroticFibrous Lesionsanti-fibroticfibrosedfibrosing
Fibrosis is the formation of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ or tissue in a reparative or reactive process.wikipedia
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Scar

scarringscar tissuescars
In response to injury, this is called scarring, and if fibrosis arises from a single cell line, this is called a fibroma.
A scar is an area of fibrous tissue that replaces normal skin after an injury.

Cirrhosis

cirrhosis of the liverliver cirrhosisliver fibrosis
The scans also found that 2.4% had the liver scarring of fibrosis, which can lead to cirrhosis.
This damage is characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue by scar tissue.

Pulmonary fibrosis

lung fibrosisfibrosislung scarring
Scar formation, the accumulation of excess fibrous connective tissue (the process called fibrosis), leads to thickening of the walls, and causes reduced oxygen supply in the blood.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

fibrosing alveolitisinterstitial pulmonary fibrosisIPF
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a type of chronic scarring lung disease characterized by a progressive and irreversible decline in lung function.

Cystic fibrosis

CFCystic fibrosis of the pancreasdisease
The name "cystic fibrosis" refers to the characteristic fibrosis and cysts that form within the pancreas.

Arthrofibrosis

Scar tissues can cause structures of the knee to become contracted, restricting normal motion.

Extracellular matrix

ECMmatrixextracellular matrices
Defined by the pathological accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibrosis results in scarring and thickening of the affected tissue, it is in essence an exaggerated wound healing response which interferes with normal organ function.
Formation of the extracellular matrix is essential for processes like growth, wound healing, and fibrosis.

Myelofibrosis

primary myelofibrosismyeloid metaplasiaagnogenic myeloid metaplasia
It is currently classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm, in which the proliferation of an abnormal clone of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and other sites results in fibrosis, or the replacement of the marrow with scar tissue.

Platelet-derived growth factor

PDGFplatelet derived growth factorproto-oncogene proteins c-sis
Other soluble mediators of fibrosis include CTGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and interleukin 10 (IL-10).
PDGF-BB is the highest-affinity ligand for the PDGFR-beta; PDGFR-beta is a key marker of hepatic stellate cell activation in the process of fibrogenesis.

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

Nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy
Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a rare syndrome that involves fibrosis of skin, joints, eyes, and internal organs.

Fibroma

fibroidsfibroid tumorfibroid
In response to injury, this is called scarring, and if fibrosis arises from a single cell line, this is called a fibroma.

Arterial stiffness

stiffness of the major arteries
Several degenerative changes that occur with age in the walls of large elastic arteries are thought to contribute to increased stiffening over time, including the mechanical fraying of lamellar elastin structures within the wall due to repeated cycles of mechanical stress; changes in the kind and increases in content of arterial collagen proteins, partially as a compensatory mechanism against the loss of arterial elastin and partially due to fibrosis; and crosslinking of adjacent collagen fibers by advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs).

Hypereosinophilic syndrome

Endomyocardial fibrosishypereosinophilicIdiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome
Chest radiographs may indicate pleural effusions and/or fibrosis, and neurological tests such as CT scans can show strokes and increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure.

CTGF

connective tissue growth factorCTGF (a.k.a. CCN2)
Other soluble mediators of fibrosis include CTGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and interleukin 10 (IL-10).
CTGF is associated with wound healing and virtually all fibrotic pathology.

Systemic scleroderma

systemic sclerosisProgressive systemic sclerosisDiffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis
Systemic scleroderma, or systemic sclerosis, is an autoimmune rheumatic disease characterised by excessive production and accumulation of collagen, called fibrosis, in the skin and internal organs and by injuries to small arteries.

Peyronie's disease

Induratio penis plasticapenile curvaturepenile induration
About 30 percent of men with Peyronie's disease develop fibrosis in other elastic tissues of the body, such as on the hand or foot, including Dupuytren's contracture of the hand.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

non-alcoholic steatohepatitisnonalcoholic fatty liver diseasenonalcoholic steatohepatitis
In Bristol University's study Children of the 90s, 2.5% of 4,000 people born in 1991 and 1992 were found by ultrasound scanning at the age of 18 to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; five years later transient elastography (fibroscan) found over 20% to have the fatty deposits on the liver of steatosis, indicating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; half of those were classified as severe.
A liver can remain fatty without disturbing liver function (NAFL), but by various mechanisms and possible insults to the liver, it may also progress into a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a state in which steatosis is combined with inflammation and sometimes fibrosis (steatohepatitis).

Elastography

Tactile imagingtransient elastographyacoustic radiation force impulse imaging
In Bristol University's study Children of the 90s, 2.5% of 4,000 people born in 1991 and 1992 were found by ultrasound scanning at the age of 18 to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; five years later transient elastography (fibroscan) found over 20% to have the fatty deposits on the liver of steatosis, indicating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; half of those were classified as severe.
Liver stiffness is usually indicative of fibrosis or steatosis (fatty liver disease), which are in turn indicative of numerous disease conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatitis.

Radiation-induced lung injury

radiation pneumonitisAcute pulmonary manifestations due to radiationFibrosis of lung following radiation

Pathology

pathologistpathologicalpathologies
These tests can be necessary to diagnose between infection, inflammation, or fibrotic conditions.

Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

Children of the 90sALSPACChildren of the 90s project (ALSPAC)
In Bristol University's study Children of the 90s, 2.5% of 4,000 people born in 1991 and 1992 were found by ultrasound scanning at the age of 18 to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; five years later transient elastography (fibroscan) found over 20% to have the fatty deposits on the liver of steatosis, indicating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; half of those were classified as severe.
The scans also found that 2.4% had the liver scarring of fibrosis, which can lead to cirrhosis.

Steatosis

fatty changefat in the liverfatty degeneration
In Bristol University's study Children of the 90s, 2.5% of 4,000 people born in 1991 and 1992 were found by ultrasound scanning at the age of 18 to have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; five years later transient elastography (fibroscan) found over 20% to have the fatty deposits on the liver of steatosis, indicating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; half of those were classified as severe.
The scans also found that 2.4% had the liver scarring of fibrosis, which can lead to cirrhosis.

Connective tissue

fibrous tissuefibrous connective tissueconnective
Fibrosis is the formation of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ or tissue in a reparative or reactive process.