Fiddlehead fern

fiddleheadfiddleheadsFiddlehead fernskasrod(Health Warning)Fiddlehead fern saladFiddlehead greenstipswarabi
Fiddleheads or fiddlehead greens are the furled fronds of a young fern, harvested for use as a vegetable.wikipedia
128 Related Articles

Fern

PolypodiopsidafernsPolypodiophyta
Fiddleheads or fiddlehead greens are the furled fronds of a young fern, harvested for use as a vegetable.
They produce coiled fiddleheads that uncoil and expand into fronds.

Bracken

bracken fernPteridiumwarabi
(See bracken poisoning)
Like other ferns, brackens do not have seeds or fruits, but the immature fronds, known as fiddleheads, are sometimes eaten, although some are thought to be carcinogenic (see Poisoning).

Vernation

circinate vernationcircinateinvolute vernation
Left on the plant, each fiddlehead would unroll into a new frond (circinate vernation).
At this stage it is called a crozier (after the shepherd's crook) or fiddlehead (after the scrollwork at the top of a violin).

Stenochlaena

Stenochlaena sp.Stenochlaena palustris
Stenochlaena palustris is known as midin in Sarawak, Malaysia and it is eaten as a popular vegetable similar to fiddlehead ferns, which is usually flavoured with shrimp paste.

Sansai

Fiddleheads in Japan are considered sansai, or wild vegetables.
For example, some of the fern shoots such as bracken (Fiddlehead) and zenmai shipped to market are farm-grown.

Osmunda regalis

royal fernflowering fernroyal fern (''Osmunda regalis'')
The young shoots of the fern are, along with the similar shoots of many other fern species, known in some places as fiddleheads, and eaten as food, thought to have an asparagus-like taste.

Diplazium esculentum

vegetable fernAthyrium esculentumFiddle head fern
In the Philippines, young fronds of Diplazium esculentum or pakô is a delicacy often made into a salad with tomato, salted egg slices, and a simple vinaigrette dressing.

Matteuccia

ostrich fernMatteuccia struthiopterisostrich
In Japan, fiddleheads of flowering fern (Osmunda japonica), known as zenmai, as well as those of the ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris), known as kogomi, are commonly eaten in springtime.
The tightly wound immature fronds, called fiddleheads, are also used as a cooked vegetable, and are considered a delicacy mainly in rural areas of northeastern North America.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
The Maliseet, Mi'kmaq, and Penobscot peoples of Eastern Canada and Maine have traditionally harvested fiddleheads, and the vegetable was introduced first to the Acadian settlers in the early 18th century, and later to United Empire Loyalist colonists as they began settling in New Brunswick in the 1780s.
Fiddlehead greens are harvested from the Ostrich fern which grows on riverbanks.

Osmunda japonica

zenmaiAsian royal fernJapanese Royal Fern
In Japan, fiddleheads of flowering fern (Osmunda japonica), known as zenmai, as well as those of the ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris), known as kogomi, are commonly eaten in springtime.
In some parts of China (where it is called 蕨菜 or juecai in Mandarin), Tibet and Japan (where it is called zenmai in Japanese), the young frond or fiddlehead of Osmunda japonica is used as a vegetable.

Shikimic acid

shikimateshikimate pathwayshikimic
It is recommended to fully cook fiddleheads to destroy the shikimic acid.
Nevertheless, it is recommended to roast tree fern fronds, a specialty called fiddlehead (furled fronds of a young tree fern in the order Cyatheales, harvested for use as a vegetable).

Tide Head, New Brunswick

Tide HeadTidehead, New Brunswick
The Canadian village of Tide Head, New Brunswick, bills itself as the "Fiddlehead Capital of the World."
Tide Head bills itself as the Fiddlehead Capital of the World and is predominantly English.

Jammu

Jammu cityJammu taviJammu region
In the area of Jammu in Jammu and Kashmir, it's known as kasrod .
Pickles typical of Jammu are made of kasrod, girgle, mango with saunf, jimikand, tyaoo, seyoo, and potatoes.

Frond

frondspinnapinnae
Fiddleheads or fiddlehead greens are the furled fronds of a young fern, harvested for use as a vegetable. Left on the plant, each fiddlehead would unroll into a new frond (circinate vernation).

Vegetable

vegetablessalad vegetablewild vegetables
Fiddleheads or fiddlehead greens are the furled fronds of a young fern, harvested for use as a vegetable.

Omega-3 fatty acid

omega-3omega-3 fatty acidsOmega 3
Fiddleheads have antioxidant activity, are a source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and are high in iron and fibre.

Omega-6 fatty acid

omega-6omega-6 fatty acidsω-6
Fiddleheads have antioxidant activity, are a source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and are high in iron and fibre.

Violin

violinsfiddleviolinist
The fiddlehead resembles the curled ornamentation (called a scroll) on the end of a stringed instrument, such as a violin.

Crosier

crozierpastoral staffstaff
It is also called a crozier, after the curved staff used by bishops, which has its origins in the shepherd's crook.

Bishop

episcopateepiscopal consecrationbishops
It is also called a crozier, after the curved staff used by bishops, which has its origins in the shepherd's crook.

Leaf vegetable

greensleafy vegetablesleafy vegetable
The fiddleheads of certain ferns are eaten as a cooked leaf vegetable.

Polystichum munitum

sword fernwestern sword fernswordfern

Osmundastrum

cinnamon fernOsmundastrum cinnamomeumOsmunda cinnamomea