Film editing

film editoreditoreditingeditedfinal cutfilm and television editoreditorseditfilm editorsfilm cutter
Film editing is both a creative and a technical part of the post-production process of filmmaking.wikipedia
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Filmmaking

filmmakerfilm productionproduction
Film editing is both a creative and a technical part of the post-production process of filmmaking.
Filmmaking involves a number of discrete stages including an initial story, idea, or commission, through screenwriting, casting, shooting, sound recording and reproduction, editing, and screening the finished product before an audience that may result in a film release and exhibition.

Film

motion picturemoviecinema
The film editor works with the raw footage, selecting shots and combines them into sequences which create a finished motion picture.
The earliest films were simply one static shot that showed an event or action with no editing or other cinematic techniques.

Film director

directordirectedfilm
Sometimes, auteurist film directors edit their own films, for example, Akira Kurosawa, Bahram Beyzai and the Coen brothers.
Some film directors started as screenwriters, cinematographers, film editors or actors.

Workprint

work printwork-print
Before the widespread use of digital non-linear editing systems, the initial editing of all films was done with a positive copy of the film negative called a film workprint (cutting copy in UK) by physically cutting and pasting together pieces of film.
A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process.

Moviola

hand-cranked or motorized film viewer
With the invention of a splicer and threading the machine with a viewer such as a Moviola, or "flatbed" machine such as a K.-E.-M.
A Moviola is a device that allows a film editor to view a film while editing.

Non-linear editing system

non-linear editingnon-linearnon-linear video editing
Before the widespread use of digital non-linear editing systems, the initial editing of all films was done with a positive copy of the film negative called a film workprint (cutting copy in UK) by physically cutting and pasting together pieces of film.
The name is in contrast to 20th century methods of linear video editing and film editing.

Dede Allen

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Dorothea Carothers "Dede" Allen (December 3, 1923 – April 17, 2010) was an American film editor, well-known "film editing doctor" to the major American movie studios, and one of cinema's all-time celebrated 'auteur' film editors.

Steenbeck

Steenbeck editing machineSteenbeck editing suite
or Steenbeck, the editing process sped up a little bit and cuts came out cleaner and more precise.
Steenbeck is brand name that has become synonymous with a type of flatbed film editing suite which is usable with both 16 mm and 35 mm optical sound and magnetic sound film.

Margaret Booth

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Margaret Booth (January 16, 1898 – October 28, 2002) was an American film editor.

Barbara McLean

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Barbara McLean (November 16, 1903 – March 28, 1996) was an American film editor with 62 film credits.

Anne V. Coates

Anne CoatesAnne Voase, Mrs Coates Hickox
The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Anne Voase Coates (12 December 1925 – 8 May 2018) was a British film editor with a more than 60-year-long career.

Verna Fields

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Verna Fields (née Hellman; March 21, 1918 – November 30, 1982) was an American film editor, film and television sound editor, educator, and entertainment industry executive.

Anne Bauchens

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Anne Bauchens (February 2, 1882 – May 7, 1967) was an American film editor who is particularly noted for her collaboration over 40 years with the director Cecil B. DeMille.

Blanche Sewell

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Blanche Sewell (October 27, 1898 – February 2, 1949) was an American film editor.

History of film

film historianfilm historyhistory of cinema
The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
He used cross-cutting editing method to show simultaneous action in different places.

Eda Warren

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Eda Warren (October 17, 1903 – July 15, 1980) was an American film editor.

Director's cut

extended cutextended versionalternative edition
Post-production editing may be summarized by three distinct phases commonly referred to as the editor's cut, the director's cut, and the final cut.
A director's cut is an edited version of a film (or television episode, music video, commercial, or video game) that is supposed to represent the director's own approved edit.

Dailies

rushesdaily rushesRush prints
Sometimes, prior to cutting, the editor and director will have seen and discussed "dailies" (raw footage shot each day) as shooting progresses.
Dailies, in filmmaking, are the raw, unedited footage shot during the making of a motion picture.

Avid Technology

AvidAvid Media ComposerAvid Technology, Inc
Today, most films are edited digitally (on systems such as Avid, Final Cut Pro or Premiere Pro) and bypass the film positive workprint altogether.
By the early 1990s, Avid products began to replace such tools as the Moviola, Steenbeck, and KEM flatbed editors, allowing editors to handle their film creations with greater ease.

Adrienne Fazan

The history of film has included many women editors such as Dede Allen, Anne Bauchens, Margaret Booth, Barbara McLean, Anne V. Coates, Adrienne Fazan, Verna Fields, Blanche Sewell and Eda Warren.
Adrienne Fazan (May 9, 1906, Los Angeles, California – August 23, 1986, Los Angeles) was an American film editor.

Post-production

post productionpostproductionpost
Film editing is both a creative and a technical part of the post-production process of filmmaking.
Film editing

Montage (filmmaking)

montagemontage sequencemontages
In motion picture terminology, a montage (from the French for "putting together" or "assembly") is a film editing technique.
Montage is a technique in film editing in which a series of short shots are edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information.

Picture lock

locked
An editor's cut (sometimes referred to as the "Assembly edit" or "Rough cut") is normally the first pass of what the final film will be when it reaches picture lock.
Picture lock is a stage in editing a film or editing a television production.

Editor's cut

assembly edit
Post-production editing may be summarized by three distinct phases commonly referred to as the editor's cut, the director's cut, and the final cut.
An editor's cut of a motion picture is made by the film editor on their own, or working with the film director.

Edwin S. Porter

Edwin Stanton PorterEdwin PorterEdwin S. Porter. Company
Other filmmakers then took up all these ideas including the American Edwin S. Porter, who started making films for the Edison Company in 1901.
It used as many as ten different indoor and outdoor locations and was groundbreaking in its use of "cross-cutting" in editing to show simultaneous action in different places.