Max Schreck as Count Orlok in the 1922 film Nosferatu. Critic and historian Kim Newman declared it as a film that set the template for the horror film.
Western films are those "set in the American West that embod[y] the spirit, the struggle and the demise of the new frontier." Pictured: Clint Eastwood in the Spaghetti Western film A Fistful of Dollars (1964).
Depiction of the usage of mirrors in horror films.
War film or anti-war movie: Lewis Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front, 1930
Bela Lugosi in Dracula (1931), a film noted as inspiring a wave of subsequent American horror films in the 1930s.
George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) led to what Newman described as a "slow burning influence" in independent and thoughtful horror films in the 1970s.
Some cast and crew members of The Blair Witch Project (1999), one of the highest grossing horror films of the 1990s.
Park Chan-wook, the director of Thirst (2009), one of the many varied Korean horror films from the early 21st century.
French director Julia Ducournau (centre) won the Palme d'Or for horror film Titane. She is pictured with actors Agathe Rousselle and Vincent Lindon, who star in the film, at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival.
Jörg Buttgereit in 2015. Buttgereit was described by Kai-Uwe Werbeck as "arguably the most visible German horror director of the 1980s and early 1990s"
Still from Dario Argento's Suspiria (1977). Curti described the film as developing an "artistic rebirth" and "irrational dimension" to the Italian gothic from its "set pieces to the color and the music."
Filmmaker and composer John Carpenter, who has directed and scored numerous horror films, performing in 2016.
Cannibal Holocaust (1980) uses a found footage style.
Still of Madhubala in Mahal (1949), considered one of the first Indian horror films.

Horror is a film genre that seeks to elicit fear or disgust in its audience for entertainment purposes.

- Horror film

A film's genre will influence the use of filmmaking styles and techniques, such as the use of flashbacks and low-key lighting in film noir; tight framing in horror films; or fonts that look like rough-hewn logs for the titles of Western films.

- Film genre
Max Schreck as Count Orlok in the 1922 film Nosferatu. Critic and historian Kim Newman declared it as a film that set the template for the horror film.

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Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). The film's cinematographer, John Alton, was the creator of many of film noir's stylized images.

Film noir

Cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and motivations.

Cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and motivations.

Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). The film's cinematographer, John Alton, was the creator of many of film noir's stylized images.
Marlene Dietrich, an actress frequently called upon to play a femme fatale.
The October 1934 issue of Black Mask featured the first appearance of the detective character whom Raymond Chandler developed into the famous Philip Marlowe.
Out of the Past (1947) directed by Jacques Tourneur, features many of the genre's hallmarks: a cynical private detective as the protagonist, a femme fatale, multiple flashbacks with voiceover narration, dramatically shadowed photography, and a fatalistic mood leavened with provocative banter. Pictured are noir icons Robert Mitchum and Jane Greer.
A scene from In a Lonely Place (1950), directed by Nicholas Ray and based on a novel by noir fiction writer Dorothy B. Hughes. Two of noir's defining actors, Gloria Grahame and Humphrey Bogart, portray star-crossed lovers in the film.
Rita Hayworth in the trailer for The Lady from Shanghai (1947)
Detour (1945) cost $117,000 to make when the biggest Hollywood studios spent around $600,000 on the average feature. Produced at small PRC, however, the film was 30 percent over budget.
Stray Dog (1949), directed and cowritten by Akira Kurosawa, contains many cinematographic and narrative elements associated with classic American film noir.
As car thief Michel Poiccard, a.k.a. Laszlo Kovacs, Jean-Paul Belmondo in À bout de souffle (Breathless; 1960). Poiccard reveres and styles himself after Humphrey Bogart's screen persona. Here he imitates a characteristic Bogart gesture, one of the film's motifs.
Sharon Stone as Catherine Tramell, archetypal modern femme fatale, in Basic Instinct (1992). Her diabolic nature is underscored by an "extra-lurid visual code", as in the notorious interrogation scene.
Harrison Ford as detective Rick Deckard in Blade Runner (1982). Like many classic noirs, the film is set in a version of Los Angeles where it constantly rains. The steam in the foreground is a familiar noir trope, while the "bluish-smoky exterior" updates the black-and-white mode.
"Loneliness has followed me my whole life, everywhere. In bars, in cars, sidewalks, stores, everywhere. There's no escape. I'm God's lonely man." Robert De Niro as neo-noir antihero Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver (1976)
Some consider Vertigo (1958) a noir on the basis of plot and tone and various motifs, but it has a modernist graphic design typical of the 1950s and a more modern set design, which would remove it from the category of film noir. Others say the combination of color and the specificity of director Alfred Hitchcock's vision exclude it from the category.
Barbara Stanwyck and Burt Lancaster were two of the most prolific stars of classic noir. The complex structure of Sorry, Wrong Number (1948) involves a real-time framing story, multiple narrators, and flashbacks within flashbacks.
By the late 1940s, the noir trend was leaving its mark on other genres. A prime example is the Western Pursued (1947), filled with psychosexual tensions and behavioral explanations derived from Freudian theory.
"You've got a touch of class, but I don't know how far you can go." "A lot depends on who's in the saddle." Bogart and Bacall in The Big Sleep.

Whether film noir qualifies as a distinct genre or whether it is more of a filmmaking style is a matter of ongoing debate among scholars.

Nor does film noir rely on anything as evident as the monstrous or supernatural elements of the horror film, the speculative leaps of the science fiction film, or the song-and-dance routines of the musical.

The "King of the Bs", Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. Vincent Price headlines a cast of veteran character actors along with a young Jack Nicholson.

B movie

Low-budget commercial motion picture.

Low-budget commercial motion picture.

The "King of the Bs", Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. Vincent Price headlines a cast of veteran character actors along with a young Jack Nicholson.
Columbia's That Certain Thing (1928) was made for less than $20,000 (about $297,791 today). Soon, director Frank Capra's association with Columbia helped vault the studio toward Hollywood's major leagues.
Stony Brooke (Wayne), Tucson Smith (Corrigan), and Lullaby Joslin (Terhune) did not get much time in harness. Republic Pictures' Pals of the Saddle (1938) lasts just 55 minutes, average for a Three Mesquiteers adventure.
Often marketed as pure sensationalism, many films noir also possessed great visual beauty. Raw Deal (1948), writes scholar Robert Smith, is "resplendent with velvety blacks, mists, netting, and other expressive accessories of poetic noir decor and lighting". Directed by Anthony Mann and shot by John Alton, it was released by Poverty Row's Eagle-Lion firm.
Rocketship X-M (1950), produced and released by small Lippert Pictures, is cited as possibly "the first postnuclear holocaust film". It was at the leading edge of a large cycle of movies, mostly low-budget and many long forgotten, classifiable as "atomic bomb cinema".
Motorpsycho (1965) was not hard to market. It had director Russ Meyer's reputation for eroticism; the biker theme ("MURDERcycles") that soon proved its popularity in historic fashion; and that trendy title word—psycho.
Piranha (1978), directed by Joe Dante and written by John Sayles for Corman's New World Pictures, is an action-filled creature feature, an environmentalist cautionary tale, and a humorous parody of Jaws. It was one of many exploitation films to mimic the design of Jaws [[:File:JAWS Movie poster.jpg|famous poster]], "with its promise of titillating thrills".
"Too gory to be an art film, too arty to be an exploitation film, funny but not quite a comedy": 168 private investors backed the Sundance winner Blood Simple's $1.5 million budget. Brothers Joel and Ethan Coen brought a striking visual style to the 1984 noir. In one repeated motif, writes David Denby, "automobile headlights threaten people doing surreptitious things in the dark."
Not all B movies are necessarily "schlock" or of shock value. Shane Carruth made the sophisticated Sundance-winning science fiction film Primer (2004) for $7,000. According to critic Adam Lemke, Carruth's "cramped, claustrophobic mise-en-scene" exemplifies a "subtle yet austere visual style that never succumbs to the restrictions of his limited budget".
Ed Wood's ultra-low-budget Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959) is often called "the worst film ever made"

In either usage, most B movies represent a particular genre—the Western was a Golden Age B movie staple, while low-budget science-fiction and horror films became more popular in the 1950s.

2001: A Space Odyssey, the landmark 1968 collaboration between filmmaker Stanley Kubrick and classic science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, featured groundbreaking special effects, such as the realization of the spaceship 
USSC Discovery One (pictured here).

Science fiction film

2001: A Space Odyssey, the landmark 1968 collaboration between filmmaker Stanley Kubrick and classic science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, featured groundbreaking special effects, such as the realization of the spaceship 
USSC Discovery One (pictured here).
Metropolis (1927) by Fritz Lang was one of the first feature length science fiction films. It was produced at Studio Babelsberg, Germany. (Photo shows the statue depicting the Machinenmensch before it is given Maria's soul, at Filmpark Babelsberg).
Peter Sellers as the titular character from Dr. Strangelove (1964)
Transformers characters at Universal Studios Hollywood

Science fiction (or sci-fi) is a film genre that uses speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel or other technologies.

The other ten super-genres are action, crime, fantasy, horror, romance, slice of life, sports, thriller, war, and western.