A report on Fish fin and Fin

Ray fins on a teleost fish, Hector's lanternfish 
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin,
(4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin
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Skeleton of a ray-finned fish
Fins are used by aquatic animals, such as this orca, to generate thrust and control the subsequent motion
Lobe-finned fishes, like this coelacanth, have fins that are borne on a fleshy, lobelike, scaly stalk extending from the body. Due to the high number of fins it possesses, the coelacanth has high maneuverability and can orient their bodies in almost any direction in the water.
Caudal fin of a great white shark
The haddock, a type of cod, is ray-finned. It has three dorsal and two anal fins
Aquatic animals typically use fins for locomotion
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin, (4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin
Cartilaginous fishes, like this shark, have fins that are elongated and supported with soft and unsegmented rays named ceratotrichia, filaments of elastic protein resembling the horny keratin in hair and feathers
Comparison between A) the swimming fin of a lobe-finned fish and B) the walking leg of a tetrapod. Bones considered to correspond with each other have the same color.
Caudal fin of a grey reef shark
In a parallel but independent evolution, the ancient reptile Ichthyosaurus communis developed fins (or flippers) very similar to fish (or dolphins)
Shark fin
In the 1990s the CIA built a robotic catfish called Charlie to test the feasibility of unmanned underwater vehicles
Comparison between A) the swimming fin of a lobe-finned fish and B) the walking leg of a tetrapod. Bones considered to correspond with each other have the same color.
In a parallel but independent evolution, the ancient reptile Ichthyosaurus communis developed fins (or flippers) very similar to fish (or dolphins)
Similar adaptations for fully aquatic lifestyle are found both in dolphins and ichthyosaurs
In the 1990s, the CIA built a robotic catfish called Charlie, designed to collect underwater intelligence undetected

Fins are distinctive anatomical features composed of bony spines or rays protruding from the body of a fish.

- Fish fin

Fish fins are used to generate thrust and control the subsequent motion.

- Fin
Ray fins on a teleost fish, Hector's lanternfish 
(1) pectoral fins (paired), (2) pelvic fins (paired), (3) dorsal fin,
(4) adipose fin, (5) anal fin, (6) caudal (tail) fin

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Pelvic fins from a Java barb (Barbonymus gonionotus)

Pelvic fin

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Pelvic fins from a Java barb (Barbonymus gonionotus)
The pelvic fin appears at roughly 21 days post fertilization in zebrafish
Pelvic fin skeleton for Danio rerio, zebrafish.
Gobiids have modified their pelvic fins into adhesive suckers.
Lumpsuckers use their modified pelvic fins to adhere to the substrate.

Pelvic fins or ventral fins are paired fins located on the ventral surface of fish.

Dermal fin rays (lepidotrichia) are positioned distally from the radials.

Dorsal fin of a shark

Dorsal fin

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Dorsal fin of a shark
Most fish, like this Prussian carp, have one dorsal fin
Sharks typically have two dorsal fins
The yellowfin tuna also has two dorsal fins
Haddocks have three dorsal fins
Differences of dorsal fins of orcas between male and female
The dorsal fin of a white shark contains dermal fibers that work "like riggings that stabilize a ship's mast", and stiffen dynamically as the shark swims faster to control roll and yaw.<ref>Lingham‐Soliar T (2005) "Dorsal fin in the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias: A dynamic stabilizer for fast swimming" Journal of Morphology, 263 (1): 1–11. {{doi|10.1002/jmor.10207}} pdf{{dead link|date=September 2017 |bot=InternetArchiveBot |fix-attempted=yes }}</ref>
Large retractable dorsal fin of the Indo-Pacific sailfish
Various species of Ichthyosaurs displaying different types of dorsal fins
Dorsal fin of a perch showing the basals and radials of the pterygiophore that support the dorsal fin.
Closeup of the dorsal fin of a common dragonet

A dorsal fin is a fin located on the back of most marine and freshwater vertebrates within various taxa of the animal kingdom.

The sunfish uses the dorsal fin (and the anal fin) for propulsion.

Jellyfish in motion

Aquatic locomotion

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Biologically propelled motion through a liquid medium.

Biologically propelled motion through a liquid medium.

Jellyfish in motion
A eurasian coot swimming
The flagellum of a Gram-negative bacteria is rotated by a molecular motor at its base
Salmon spermatozoa for artificial propagation
Shrimp paddle with special swimming legs (pleopods)
Daphnia swims by beating its antennae
Octopuses swim headfirst, with arms trailing behind
Jellyfish pulsate their bell for a type of jet locomotion
Scallops swim by clapping their two shells open and closed
Open water fish, like this Atlantic bluefin tuna, are usually streamlined for straightline speed, with a deeply forked tail and a smooth body shaped like a spindle tapered at both ends.
Many reef fish, like this queen angelfish, have a body flattened like a pancake, with pectoral and pelvic fins that act with the flattened body to maximize manoeuvrability.
The leopard shark angles its pectoral fins so they behave as hydrofoils to control the animal's pitch
The slowest-moving fishes are the sea horses, often found in reefs
Common toad (Bufo bufo) swimming
Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) swimming
Immature Hawaiian green sea turtle in shallow waters
Macroplata
Comparative skeletal anatomy of a typical otariid seal and a typical phocid seal
Animated representation of lobstering
Chinstrap penguin leaping over water
Swimming dog

Many fish swim through water by creating undulations with their bodies or oscillating their fins.

Hydrofoils, or fins, are used to push against the water to create a normal force to provide thrust, propelling the animal through water.