Finch

Fringillidaefinchestrue finchfinch familytrue finchesawppisbirdblue birdbrown finchesBus Terminal
The true finches are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Fringillidae.wikipedia
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Estrildidae

estrildid finchwaxbillestrildid
These groups include: the estrildid finches (Estrildidae) of the Old World tropics and Australia; some members of the Old World bunting family (Emberizidae) and the American sparrow family (Passerellidae); and the Darwin's finches of the Galapagos islands, now considered members of the tanager family (Thraupidae).
Despite the word "finch" being included in the common names of many of the species, they are not closely related to birds with this name in other families, such as the Fringillidae, Emberizidae or Passerellidae.

American sparrow

Passerellidaesparrowsparrows
These groups include: the estrildid finches (Estrildidae) of the Old World tropics and Australia; some members of the Old World bunting family (Emberizidae) and the American sparrow family (Passerellidae); and the Darwin's finches of the Galapagos islands, now considered members of the tanager family (Thraupidae).
American sparrows are also similar in both appearance and habit to finches, with which they sometimes used to be classified.

Darwin's finches

finchesGalapagos finchesGalápagos finches
These groups include: the estrildid finches (Estrildidae) of the Old World tropics and Australia; some members of the Old World bunting family (Emberizidae) and the American sparrow family (Passerellidae); and the Darwin's finches of the Galapagos islands, now considered members of the tanager family (Thraupidae).
They belong to the tanager family and are not closely related to the true finches.

Tanager

Thraupidaetanagersthraupid "finches
These groups include: the estrildid finches (Estrildidae) of the Old World tropics and Australia; some members of the Old World bunting family (Emberizidae) and the American sparrow family (Passerellidae); and the Darwin's finches of the Galapagos islands, now considered members of the tanager family (Thraupidae).
Already, species in the genera Euphonia and Chlorophonia, which were once considered part of the tanager family, are now treated as members of the Fringillidae, in their own subfamily (Euphoniinae).

Hawaiian honeycreeper

DrepanidinaehoneycreepersDrepanididae
The Hawaiian honeycreepers were at one time placed in their own family, Drepanididae but were found to be closely related to the Carpodacus rosefinches and are now placed within the Carduelinae subfamily.
The honeycreepers were sometimes categorized as a family Drepanididae, other authorities considered them a subfamily, Drepanidinae, of Fringillidae, the finch family.

Rosefinch

Carpodacusrose finchesrosefinches
The Hawaiian honeycreepers were at one time placed in their own family, Drepanididae but were found to be closely related to the Carpodacus rosefinches and are now placed within the Carduelinae subfamily. The three largest genera, Carpodacus, Carduelis and Serinus were found to be polyphyletic.
The rosefinches are a genus, Carpodacus, of passerine birds in the finch family Fringillidae.

Carduelis

goldfinchfinchesgoldfinches
The three largest genera, Carpodacus, Carduelis and Serinus were found to be polyphyletic.
is a group of birds in the finch family Fringillidae.

Serinus

serincanariesCanary
The three largest genera, Carpodacus, Carduelis and Serinus were found to be polyphyletic.
Serinus is a genus of small birds in the finch family Fringillidae found in Europe and Africa.

Carduelinae

carduelinecardueline finchescardueline finch
Today the family Fringillidae is divided into three subfamilies, the Fringillinae containing a single genus with the chaffinches, the Carduelinae containing 183 species divided into 49 genera, and the Euphoniinae containing the Euphonia and the Chlorophonia.
The cardueline finches are a subfamily, Carduelinae, one of three subfamilies of the finch family Fringillidae, the others being the Fringillinae and the Euphoniinae.

Crithagra

Thirty seven species were moved from Serinus to Crithagra leaving eight species in the original genus.
Crithagra is a genus of small passerine birds in the finch family (Fringillidae).

Spinus (genus)

SpinusSpinus'' (genus)
Carduelis was split by moving the greenfinches to Chloris and a large clade into Spinus leaving just three species in the original genus.
Spinus is a genus of passerine birds in the finch family.

Euphoniinae

Today the family Fringillidae is divided into three subfamilies, the Fringillinae containing a single genus with the chaffinches, the Carduelinae containing 183 species divided into 49 genera, and the Euphoniinae containing the Euphonia and the Chlorophonia.
Euphoniinae is a subfamily of finches endemic to the Neotropics.

Euphonia

Today the family Fringillidae is divided into three subfamilies, the Fringillinae containing a single genus with the chaffinches, the Carduelinae containing 183 species divided into 49 genera, and the Euphoniinae containing the Euphonia and the Chlorophonia.
Euphonias are members of the genus Euphonia, a group of Neotropical birds in the finch family.

Greenfinch

Chlorisgreenfinches
Carduelis was split by moving the greenfinches to Chloris and a large clade into Spinus leaving just three species in the original genus.
The greenfinches are small passerine birds in the genus Chloris in the subfamily Carduelinae within the Fringillidae.

Common chaffinch

chaffinchFringilla coelebschaffinches
The scientific name Fringillidae comes from the Latin word fringilla for the common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), a member of the family which is common in Europe.
The common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), usually known simply as the chaffinch, is a common and widespread small passerine bird in the finch family.

American rosefinch

Haemorhous
The American rosefinches were moved from Carpodacus to Haemorhous.
The American rosefinches that form the genus Haemorhous, are a group of passerine birds in the finch family Fringillidae.

Chlorophonia

Today the family Fringillidae is divided into three subfamilies, the Fringillinae containing a single genus with the chaffinches, the Carduelinae containing 183 species divided into 49 genera, and the Euphoniinae containing the Euphonia and the Chlorophonia.
Chlorophonia is a genus of finches in the family Fringillidae.

Andean siskin

Carduelis spinescens
The smallest "classical" true finches are the Andean siskin (Spinus spinescens) at as little as 9.5 cm (3.8 in) and the lesser goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) at as little as 8 g. The largest species is probably the collared grosbeak (Mycerobas affinis) at up to 24 cm and 83 g, although larger lengths, to 25.5 cm in the pine grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), and weights, to 86.1 g in the evening grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertinus), have been recorded in species which are slightly smaller on average.
The Andean siskin (Spinus spinescens) is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae.

Collared grosbeak

Mycerobas affinis
The smallest "classical" true finches are the Andean siskin (Spinus spinescens) at as little as 9.5 cm (3.8 in) and the lesser goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) at as little as 8 g. The largest species is probably the collared grosbeak (Mycerobas affinis) at up to 24 cm and 83 g, although larger lengths, to 25.5 cm in the pine grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), and weights, to 86.1 g in the evening grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertinus), have been recorded in species which are slightly smaller on average.
The collared grosbeak (Mycerobas affinis) is a species of finch in the family Fringillidae.

Evening grosbeak

Coccothraustes vespertinusHesperiphona vespertina
The smallest "classical" true finches are the Andean siskin (Spinus spinescens) at as little as 9.5 cm (3.8 in) and the lesser goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) at as little as 8 g. The largest species is probably the collared grosbeak (Mycerobas affinis) at up to 24 cm and 83 g, although larger lengths, to 25.5 cm in the pine grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), and weights, to 86.1 g in the evening grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertinus), have been recorded in species which are slightly smaller on average.
The evening grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) is a passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae found in North America.

Przevalski's finch

UrocynchramidaePrzewalski's "rosefinchpink-tailed bunting
Although Przewalski's "rosefinch" (Urocynchramus pylzowi) has ten primary flight feathers rather than the nine primaries of other finches, it was sometimes classified in the Carduelinae.
In 2000 it was proposed that it should in fact be regarded neither as a finch nor a bunting, but as the only member of the family Urocynchramidae, something that had been originally proposed in the German ornithological literature as long ago as 1918 by Janusz von Domaniewski, and also by Wolters in 1979.

Lesser goldfinch

Carduelis psaltriagoldfinchesSpinus psaltria
The smallest "classical" true finches are the Andean siskin (Spinus spinescens) at as little as 9.5 cm (3.8 in) and the lesser goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) at as little as 8 g. The largest species is probably the collared grosbeak (Mycerobas affinis) at up to 24 cm and 83 g, although larger lengths, to 25.5 cm in the pine grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), and weights, to 86.1 g in the evening grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertinus), have been recorded in species which are slightly smaller on average.
This petite species is not only the smallest North American Spinus finch, it may be the smallest true finch in the world.

List of true finch species

List of Fringillidae species
See List of Fringillidae species for further details.
The family Fringillidae are the "true" finches.

Domestic canary

canarycanariesminer's canary
Finches and canaries were used in the UK, Canada and USA in the coal mining industry, to detect carbon monoxide from the eighteenth to twentieth century.
The domestic canary, often simply known as the canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica ), is a domesticated form of the wild canary, a small songbird in the finch family originating from the Macaronesian Islands (the Azores, Madeira and the Canary Islands).

Galápagos Islands

Galapagos IslandsGalapagosGalápagos
These groups include: the estrildid finches (Estrildidae) of the Old World tropics and Australia; some members of the Old World bunting family (Emberizidae) and the American sparrow family (Passerellidae); and the Darwin's finches of the Galapagos islands, now considered members of the tanager family (Thraupidae).
When specimens of birds were analyzed on his return to England, it was found that many apparently different kinds of birds were species of finches, which were unique to islands.