First Battle of the Aisne

Aisne 1914Battle of the AisneAisneBattle of Aisnethe Aisne Battle of Aisneadvance towards the Aisneadvanced to the AisneAisne 1914 '18Aisne River
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.wikipedia
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First Battle of the Marne

Battle of the MarneMarne 1914Marne
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.
A counter-attack by six French armies and the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) along the Marne River forced the Imperial German Army to retreat northwest, leading to the First Battle of the Aisne and the Race to the Sea.

British Expeditionary Force (World War I)

British Expeditionary ForceBEFOld Contemptibles
In dense fog on the night of 13 September, most of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) crossed the Aisne on pontoons or partially demolished bridges, landing at Bourg-et-Comin on the right and at Venizel on the left.
By the end of 1914—after the battles of Mons, Le Cateau, the Aisne and Ypres—the old Regular Army had been wiped out, although it managed to help stop the German advance.

Trench warfare

trenchestrenchentrenchment
Trench warfare was also new for the Germans, whose training and equipment were designed for a mobile war to be won in six weeks, but they quickly adapted their weapons to the new situation.
After the Battle of the Aisne in September 1914, an extended series of attempted flanking moves, and matching extensions to the fortified defensive lines, developed into the "race to the sea", by the end of which German and Allied armies had produced a matched pair of trench lines from the Swiss border in the south to the North Sea coast of Belgium.

Race to the Sea

Race for the SeaadvancingARMENTIERES 1914
The period is called "Race to the Sea".
The Race to the Sea (Course à la mer; Wettlauf zum Meer, Race naar de Zee) took place from about 1914, after the Battle of the Frontiers and the German advance into France, which had been stopped at the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September) and was followed by the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September), a Franco-British counter-offensive.

Chemin des Dames

Battle of Chemin des DamesChemin-des-Dames Battle of the Aisne
The French Fifth Army crossed the Aisne at Berry-au-Bac and captured the eastern tip of Chemin des Dames, a steep ridge named after the royal coach road Louis XV had built for his daughters.

1st Army (German Empire)

1st Army1 Armee1st
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

John French, 1st Earl of Ypres

Sir John FrenchJohn FrenchFrench
On 14 September, Sir John French ordered the entire BEF to entrench, but few entrenching tools were available.
Sir John initially thought (14 September) that the enemy was only "making a determined stand" on the Aisne.

Third Battle of the Aisne

Aisne-MarneAisneAisne Defensive
There were two later battles on the Aisne; the second (April–May 1917) and the third (May–June 1918).
The Germans held the Chemin des Dames Ridge from the First Battle of the Aisne in September 1914 to 1917, when General Mangin captured it during the Second Battle of the Aisne (in the Nivelle Offensive).

Battle of the Yser

battle of DiksmuideYserat the Yser
After six days of stubborn fighting, the remaining garrison retired across the Scheldt River to the southern border of the Netherlands, while the rest of the Belgian army retreated to the West, to defend the last piece of Belgian territory in the Battle of the Yser (16–31 October 1914).
During the siege of Antwerp, the German and French armies fought the Battle of the Frontiers (7 August – 13 September) and then the German armies in the north pursued the French and the BEF southwards into France in the Great Retreat, which culminated in the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September), followed by the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September).

Neil Douglas Findlay

N. D. Findlay
Whilst serving in this capacity during the First Battle of the Aisne Findlay was hit by shrapnel from a German shell and killed.

Great Retreat

Retreat from Monsretreatsubsequent retreat
From 5 to 12 September, the First Battle of the Marne ended the Allied retreat and forced the German armies to retire towards the Aisne river and fight the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September).

Ronald Simson

Ronald Francis Simson
Simson was killed in the First Battle of the Aisne, which was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) & Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

Vailly British Cemetery

Vailly-sur-Aisne British Cemetery
Many of those killed at the Aisne are buried at Vailly British Cemetery.
Most of the men interred at Vailly were killed in the Battle of the Aisne in September 1914.

La Ferté-sous-Jouarre memorial

La Ferte-sous-Jouarre MemorialRoyal Engineers First World War memorial at La Ferté-sous-Jouarre

Allies of World War I

AlliesAlliedAllied Powers
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

Alexander von Kluck

von KluckGeneral von KluckGeneraloberst von Kluck
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

2nd Army (German Empire)

2nd ArmySecond Army2 Armee
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

Karl von Bülow

von BülowBulowBülow
The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914.

Western Front (World War I)

Western FrontFranceFrance and Flanders 1914–18
When the Germans turned to face the pursuing Allies on 13 September, they held one of the most formidable positions on the Western Front.

Compiègne

CompiegneCompeigneCompiegne, France
Between Compiègne and Berry-au-Bac, the Aisne River winds westward and is about 100 ft wide, ranging from 12 – deep.

Berry-au-Bac

Between Compiègne and Berry-au-Bac, the Aisne River winds westward and is about 100 ft wide, ranging from 12 – deep.

Aisne (river)

AisneAisne RiverRiver Aisne
Between Compiègne and Berry-au-Bac, the Aisne River winds westward and is about 100 ft wide, ranging from 12 – deep.

Cover (military)

covercover and concealmentconcealment
Low crops in the unfenced countryside offered no natural concealment to the Allies.

Escarpment

scarpscarpsescarpments
Deep, narrow paths cut into the escarpment at right angles, exposing any infiltrators to extreme hazard.

Field of fire (weaponry)

field of firefields of firebeaten zone
The forces on the northern plateau commanded a wide field of fire.