First Lady of the United States

First LadyU.S. First LadyFirst LadiesUS First LadyUnited States First LadyFirst Ladies of the United StatesFirst Lady of the United States of AmericaFLOTUSFirst GentlemanFirst Lady of the U.S.
First Lady of the United States (FLOTUS) is the title held by the hostess of the White House, usually the wife of the president of the United States, concurrent with the president's term in office.wikipedia
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Melania Trump

MelaniaMelania KnaussFirst Lady Melania Trump
Melania Trump is the current first lady of the United States, as wife of 45th president of the United States, Donald Trump.
Melania Trump (born Melanija Knavs;, Germanized to Melania Knauss; April 26, 1970) is a Slovenian-American former fashion model and the current first lady of the United States, as the wife of the 45th president of the United States Donald Trump.

Office of the First Lady of the United States

Office of the First LadyChief of Staff to the First LadyPress Secretary for the First Lady
Since the early 20th century, the first lady has been assisted by official staff, now known as the Office of the First Lady and headquartered in the East Wing of the White House.
The Office of the First Lady of the United States is the staff accountable to the first lady of the United States.

Rosalynn Carter

RosalynnRosalynRosalynn Smith Carter
There are four living former first ladies: Rosalynn Carter, wife of Jimmy Carter; Hillary Clinton, wife of Bill Clinton; Laura Bush, wife of George W. Bush; and Michelle Obama, wife of Barack Obama. Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
Eleanor Rosalynn Carter (née Smith; born August 18, 1927) is an American who served as First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981, as the wife of President Jimmy Carter.

Martha Washington

MarthaMartha Dandridge CustisMartha Custis Washington
While the title was not in general use until much later, Martha Washington, the wife of George Washington, the first U.S. president (1789–1797), is considered to be the inaugural first lady of the United States.
Although the title was not coined until after her death, Martha Washington served as the inaugural First Lady of the United States.

Hillary Clinton

ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonHillary
There are four living former first ladies: Rosalynn Carter, wife of Jimmy Carter; Hillary Clinton, wife of Bill Clinton; Laura Bush, wife of George W. Bush; and Michelle Obama, wife of Barack Obama. Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
She served as First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as a United States senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, and as the 67th United States secretary of state from 2009 until 2013.

Laura Bush

LauraLaura WelchMichael Dutton Douglas
There are four living former first ladies: Rosalynn Carter, wife of Jimmy Carter; Hillary Clinton, wife of Bill Clinton; Laura Bush, wife of George W. Bush; and Michelle Obama, wife of Barack Obama. Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
Laura Welch Bush (née Laura Lane Welch; born November 4, 1946) is an American educator who was First Lady of the United States during the presidency of her husband, George W. Bush, from 2001 to 2009.

Michelle Obama

MichelleFirst Lady Michelle ObamaLet Girls Learn
There are four living former first ladies: Rosalynn Carter, wife of Jimmy Carter; Hillary Clinton, wife of Bill Clinton; Laura Bush, wife of George W. Bush; and Michelle Obama, wife of Barack Obama.
Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama (née Robinson; born January 17, 1964) is an American lawyer, university administrator, and writer, who was the first lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017.

Dolley Madison

Dolley Payne Todd MadisonDolleyDolley Payne Todd
Dolley Madison was reportedly referred to as "First Lady" in 1849 at her funeral in a eulogy delivered by President Zachary Taylor; however, no written record of this eulogy exists, nor did any of the newspapers of her day refer to her by that title.
By innovating political institutions as the wife of James Madison, Dolley Madison did much to define the role of the President's spouse, known only much later by the title First Lady—a function she had sometimes performed earlier for the widowed Thomas Jefferson.

Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary ToddMary LincolnMrs. Lincoln
One of the earliest known written examples comes from November 3, 1863, diary entry of William Howard Russell, in which he referred to gossip about "the First Lady in the Land", referring to Mary Todd Lincoln.
Mary Todd Lincoln ( Mary Ann Todd; December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the wife of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, and as such the First Lady of the United States from 1861 to 1865.

Lucy Webb Hayes

Lucy HayesLucyLucy Webb
The title first gained nationwide recognition in 1877, when newspaper journalist Mary C. Ames referred to Lucy Webb Hayes as "the First Lady of the Land" while reporting on the inauguration of Rutherford B. Hayes.
Lucy Ware Hayes (née Webb; August 28, 1831 – June 25, 1889) was the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes and served as First Lady of the United States.

Edith Wilson

Edith Bolling Galt WilsonEdith Bolling WilsonEdith
When Edith Wilson took control of her husband's schedule in 1919 after he had a debilitating stroke, one Republican senator labeled her "the Presidentress who had fulfilled the dream of the suffragettes by changing her title from First Lady to Acting First Man."
Edith Wilson ( Bolling, formerly Edith Bolling Galt; October 15, 1872 – December 28, 1961), second wife of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, was the First Lady of the United States from 1915 to 1921.

Second Lady of the United States

Second LadySecond GentlemanChief of Staff to the Second Lady
The wife of the vice president of the United States is sometimes referred to as the second lady of the United States (SLOTUS), but this title is much less common.
This title is less commonly used than the title first lady of the United States.

Harriet Lane

Harriet Lane JohnstonHarriet Rebecca Laneniece
In these cases, the position has been filled by a female relative or friend of the president, such as Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, Jackson's daughter-in-law Sarah Yorke Jackson and his wife's niece Emily Donelson, Taylor's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bliss, Benjamin Harrison's daughter Mary Harrison McKee, Buchanan's niece Harriet Lane, and Cleveland's sister Rose Cleveland.
Harriet Rebecca Lane Johnston (May 9, 1830 – July 3, 1903) acted as First Lady of the United States during the presidency of her uncle, lifelong bachelor James Buchanan, from 1857 to 1861.

Emily Donelson

Emily Tennessee DonelsonEmily
In these cases, the position has been filled by a female relative or friend of the president, such as Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, Jackson's daughter-in-law Sarah Yorke Jackson and his wife's niece Emily Donelson, Taylor's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bliss, Benjamin Harrison's daughter Mary Harrison McKee, Buchanan's niece Harriet Lane, and Cleveland's sister Rose Cleveland.
She served as White House hostess and de facto First Lady of the United States.

Martha Jefferson Randolph

MarthaMartha JeffersonMartha Randolph
In these cases, the position has been filled by a female relative or friend of the president, such as Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, Jackson's daughter-in-law Sarah Yorke Jackson and his wife's niece Emily Donelson, Taylor's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bliss, Benjamin Harrison's daughter Mary Harrison McKee, Buchanan's niece Harriet Lane, and Cleveland's sister Rose Cleveland.
When her widowed father was President, she sometimes lived with him at the White House, serving as his hostess and informal First Lady.

Rose Cleveland

Rose
In these cases, the position has been filled by a female relative or friend of the president, such as Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, Jackson's daughter-in-law Sarah Yorke Jackson and his wife's niece Emily Donelson, Taylor's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bliss, Benjamin Harrison's daughter Mary Harrison McKee, Buchanan's niece Harriet Lane, and Cleveland's sister Rose Cleveland.
Rose Elizabeth ”Libby” Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was acting First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother, President Grover Cleveland's two administrations.

Eleanor Roosevelt

EleanorAnna Eleanor RooseveltMrs. Roosevelt
Madison set the standard for the ladyship and her actions were the model for nearly every first lady until Eleanor Roosevelt in the 1930s.
She served as the First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1933, to April 12, 1945, during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, making her the longest-serving First Lady of the United States.

Sarah Yorke Jackson

Sarah YorkeSarah Jackson
In these cases, the position has been filled by a female relative or friend of the president, such as Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, Jackson's daughter-in-law Sarah Yorke Jackson and his wife's niece Emily Donelson, Taylor's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bliss, Benjamin Harrison's daughter Mary Harrison McKee, Buchanan's niece Harriet Lane, and Cleveland's sister Rose Cleveland.
She served as White House hostess and de facto First Lady of the United States from November 26, 1834, to March 4, 1837.

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

Jacqueline KennedyJackie KennedyJacqueline
Jacqueline Kennedy led an effort to redecorate and restore the White House.
Jacqueline Lee Kennedy Onassis (née Bouvier ; July 28, 1929 – May 19, 1994) was First Lady of the United States during the presidency of John F. Kennedy and was regarded then and afterward as an international icon of style and culture.

Abigail Adams

AbigailAbigail Smith AdamsAbigail Smith
Both Martha Washington and Abigail Adams were treated as if they were "ladies" of the British royal court.
She is sometimes considered to have been a Founder of the United States, and is now designated as the first Second Lady and second First Lady of the United States, although these titles were not used at the time.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
Since the early 20th century, the first lady has been assisted by official staff, now known as the Office of the First Lady and headquartered in the East Wing of the White House. First Lady of the United States (FLOTUS) is the title held by the hostess of the White House, usually the wife of the president of the United States, concurrent with the president's term in office.
Among its uses, the East Wing has intermittently housed the offices and staff of the first lady, and the White House Social Office.

Lady Bird Johnson

Lady BirdLadybird JohnsonClaudia Alta Taylor "Lady Bird" Johnson
Lady Bird Johnson pioneered environmental protection and beautification.
Claudia Alta "Lady Bird" Johnson (née Taylor; December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007) was an American socialite and the First Lady of the United States (1963–1969) as the wife of the 36th President of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson.

Pat Nixon

PatPat RyanPatricia Nixon
Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
During her more than 30 years in public life, she served as both the Second (1953–1961) and First Lady of the United States (1969–1974).

Betty Ford

BettyMrs. FordElizabeth Ford
Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
Elizabeth Anne Ford (née Bloomer; April 8, 1918 – July 8, 2011) was the First Lady of the United States from 1974 to 1977, as the wife of President Gerald Ford.

Nancy Reagan

Nancy DavisNancyNancy Davis Reagan
Pat Nixon encouraged volunteerism and traveled extensively abroad; Betty Ford supported women's rights; Rosalynn Carter aided those with mental disabilities; Nancy Reagan founded the Just Say No drug awareness campaign; Barbara Bush promoted literacy; Hillary Clinton sought to reform the healthcare system in the U.S.; Laura Bush supported women's rights groups, and encouraged childhood literacy.
She was the first lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989.