First Russell ministry

Russell IWhig governmentgovernmentWhig administrationfirst administrationthe first Russell administrationfirst governmentImperial GovernmentLord John Russellministry
Whig Lord John Russell led the government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1846 to 1852.wikipedia
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Second Peel ministry

Peel IITory administrationsecond government
Following the split in the Tory Party over the Corn Laws in 1846 and the consequent end of Sir Robert Peel's second government, the Whigs came to power under Lord John Russell.
The government was brought down by Peel's decision in 1846 to support the repeal of the Corn Laws, leading to a split in the Tory party and the formation of a Whig government under Lord John Russell.

Who? Who? ministry

Who? Who?first administrationFirst Derby Ministry
Palmerston thereafter successfully devoted his energies to bringing down Russell's government, leading to the formation of a minority Conservative government under Lord Derby in February 1852.
After the fall of Lord John Russell's Whig government in early 1852, the Conservative leader Lord Derby formed a government.

Charles Wood, 1st Viscount Halifax

Charles WoodSir Charles WoodSir Charles Wood, Bt
Sir Charles Wood became Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir George Grey Home Secretary and Lord Palmerston Foreign Secretary for the third time.
A Liberal and Member of Parliament from 1826 to 1866, Wood served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord John Russell's government (1846 –1852), where he opposed any further help for Ireland during the Great Famine there.

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell

Lord John RussellLord RussellJohn Russell
Whig Lord John Russell led the government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1846 to 1852.
It has been said that his ministry of 1846 to 1852 was the ruin of the Whig party: it never composed a Government again, and his ministry of 1865 to 1866 was very nearly the ruin of the Liberal Party also.

Home Secretary

Home SecretariesSecretary of State for the Home DepartmentSecretary of State
Sir Charles Wood became Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir George Grey Home Secretary and Lord Palmerston Foreign Secretary for the third time.

Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs

Foreign SecretaryBritish Foreign SecretarySecretary of State for Foreign Affairs
Sir Charles Wood became Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir George Grey Home Secretary and Lord Palmerston Foreign Secretary for the third time.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorChancellors of the ExchequerSpokesperson for the Treasury
Sir Charles Wood became Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir George Grey Home Secretary and Lord Palmerston Foreign Secretary for the third time.

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro

Sir Thomas WildeThomas WildeLord Truro
He held this latter office until the fall of the Russell ministry in 1852.

Edward Pleydell-Bouverie

Hon. Edward Pleydell-BouverieE Pleydell-Bouverie
He served as Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department in Lord John Russell's first administration from July 1850 to March 1852, and from April 1853 to March 1855 he was Chairman of Committees of the House of Commons, while Lord Aberdeen was prime minister.

Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster

2nd Marquess of WestminsterViscount BelgraveThe Marquess of Westminster
He was Lord Lieutenant of Cheshire from 1845 to 1867 and Lord Steward of the Household between 1850 and 1852 in the Whig administration headed by Lord John Russell.

Henry Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey

Lord PagetLord UxbridgeThe Marquess of Anglesey
Paget spent the following thirteen years out of office, then joined Lord John Russell's administration as Master-General of the Ordnance in July 1846.

Richard Bellew

He took office as a Junior Lord of the Treasury in Lord John Russell's first government on the death of Denis O'Conor.

Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Glossop

Lord Edward HowardLord Edward Fitzalan-HowardEdward Fitzalan-Howard
In 1846 Howard was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Household in Lord John Russell's first administration, despite not having a seat in Parliament.

Richard Moore (Irish lawyer)

Richard MooreJudge Moore
Moore was Attorney-General for Ireland during part of Lord John Russell's Whig Government 1846-1852, holding that office from 16 July 1846 to 21 December 1847.

Henry Reynolds-Moreton, 2nd Earl of Ducie

Earl of DucieHon. Henry Reynolds-Moreton2nd Earl of Ducie
After entering the House of Lords on the death of his father in 1840 he served in the Whig administration of Lord Russell as a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1846 to 1847, when he resigned.

Lucius Cary, 10th Viscount Falkland

The Viscount FalklandLord FalklandLucius Bentinck Cary
He then returned to England and held office in the Whig government of Lord John Russell as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard from 1846 to 1848.

Edmund Parker, 2nd Earl of Morley

Earl of MorleyEdmund ParkerHarriet Sophia Parker (later Dowager Countess of Morley)
From 1846 to 1852 he served as a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) in the Whig administration of Lord John Russell.

George Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall

Earl of BelfastThe Earl of BelfastGeorge Chichester
Lord Donegall did not serve initially in Lord John Russell's first administration, but in 1848 he returned to the government as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard.