First Sino-Japanese War

Sino-Japanese WarSino-Japanese War (1894-1895)Sino–Japanese WarFirst Sino-JapaneseSino Japanese WarSino-Japanese War of 1894–95ChinaFirst Sino–Japanese WarJapanSino-Japanese War (1894–1895)
The First Sino-Japanese War (25 July 1894 – 17 April 1895), also known as the Chino-Japanese War, was a conflict between China and Japan primarily over influence in Korea.wikipedia
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Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
The First Sino-Japanese War (25 July 1894 – 17 April 1895), also known as the Chino-Japanese War, was a conflict between China and Japan primarily over influence in Korea.
Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei and Shokusan Kōgyō led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire following the First Sino-Japanese War, the Boxer Rebellion, the Russo-Japanese War, and World War I.

Qing dynasty

QingQing EmpireChina
The First Sino-Japanese War (25 July 1894 – 17 April 1895), also known as the Chino-Japanese War, was a conflict between China and Japan primarily over influence in Korea. After more than six months of unbroken successes by Japanese land and naval forces and the loss of the port of Weihaiwei, the Qing government sued for peace in February 1895.
The initial gains in the Self-Strengthening Movement were lost in the First Sino-Japanese War of 1895, in which the Qing lost its influence over Korea and the possession of Taiwan.

Xinhai Revolution

1911 RevolutionChinese RevolutionChinese Revolution of 1911
Within China, the defeat was a catalyst for a series of political upheavals led by Sun Yat-sen and Kang Youwei, culminating in the 1911 Xinhai Revolution.
In 1895, China suffered another defeat during the First Sino-Japanese War.

Weihai

WeihaiweiWei-hai-weiWei Hai Wei
After more than six months of unbroken successes by Japanese land and naval forces and the loss of the port of Weihaiwei, the Qing government sued for peace in February 1895.
In 1895, the Japanese captured it in the Battle of Weihaiwei, which is regarded as the last major battle of the First Sino-Japanese War.

Sun Yat-sen

Sun YatsenDr. Sun Yat-senSun Zhongshan
Within China, the defeat was a catalyst for a series of political upheavals led by Sun Yat-sen and Kang Youwei, culminating in the 1911 Xinhai Revolution.
In 1895, China suffered a serious defeat during the First Sino-Japanese War.

Nagasaki

Nagasaki, JapanNagasaki, NagasakiNagasaki City
The survivors carrying the wounded, then boarded a small boat and headed for the open sea where three days later they were rescued by a British survey ship, which took them to Nagasaki. The Nagasaki incident was a riot that took place in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki in 1886.
Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.

Gojong of Korea

GojongEmperor GojongKing Gojong
In January 1864, Cheoljong of Joseon died without a male heir, and through Korean succession protocols Gojong of Korea ascended the throne at the age of 12. On June 4, the Korean king, Gojong, requested aid from the Qing government in suppressing the Donghak Rebellion.
In the 19th century tensions mounted between Qing China and Japan, culminating in the First Sino-Japanese War in 1894–1895.

Li Hongzhang

Li Hung-changLi Hung ChangLee Hung-cheung
Two special advisers on foreign affairs representing Chinese interests were dispatched to Korea: the German Paul Georg von Möllendorff, a close confidant of Li Hongzhang, and the Chinese diplomat Ma Jianzhong.
Although he was best known in the West for his generally pro-modern stance and importance as a negotiator, Li antagonised the British with his support of Russia as a foil against Japanese expansionism in Manchuria and fell from favour with the Chinese after their defeat in the First Sino-Japanese War.

East Asia

East AsianEastEastern Asia
For the first time, regional dominance in East Asia shifted from China to Japan; the prestige of the Qing Dynasty, along with the classical tradition in China, suffered a major blow.
Japan defeated the stagnant Qing dynasty during the First Sino-Japanese War, thereafter annexing Korea and Taiwan from China.

Suing for peace

sue for peacesued for peacesues for peace
After more than six months of unbroken successes by Japanese land and naval forces and the loss of the port of Weihaiwei, the Qing government sued for peace in February 1895.
The First Sino-Japanese War (1 August 1894 – 17 April 1895) was fought between the Qing Empire of China and the Empire of Japan, primarily over influence of Korea.

Empress Myeongseong

Queen MinEulmi Incidentassassinated
With Empress Myeongseong as his daughter-in-law and the royal consort, the Daewongun felt secure in his power.
After Japan's victory in the First Sino-Japanese War, Joseon Korea came under the Japanese sphere of influence.

Imperial Japanese Navy

JapaneseJapanese NavyJapanese Imperial Navy
Japanese reforms under the Meiji government gave significant priority to the creation of an effective modern national army and navy, especially naval construction.
First Sino-Japanese War

Donghak Peasant Revolution

Donghak RebellionDonghak Peasant RebellionDonghak
On June 4, the Korean king, Gojong, requested aid from the Qing government in suppressing the Donghak Rebellion.
Japan, angered that the Qing government, had not informed Japan (as promised in the Convention of Tientsin), started the First Sino-Japanese War.

Yuan Shikai

Yuan Shih-kaiYuan Shih-k'aiYuan Shi Kai
Furthermore, the Chingunyeong (Capital Guards Command), a new Korean military formation, was created and trained along Chinese lines by Yuan Shikai.
Yuan, having been put in an ineffective position, was recalled to Tianjin in July 1894, before the official outbreak of the First Sino-Japanese War .

Beiyang Fleet

Beiyang Navya new imperial navyChinese
Four warships from the Qing Empire's navy, the Beiyang Fleet, stopped at Nagasaki, apparently to carry out repairs.
Due to Li's influence in the imperial court, the Beiyang Fleet garnered much greater resources than the other Chinese fleets and soon became the dominant navy in Asia before the onset of First Sino-Japanese War in 1894–1895 — it was the largest fleet in Asia and the 8th in the world during the late 1880s in terms of tonnage.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
The First Sino-Japanese War (25 July 1894 – 17 April 1895), also known as the Chino-Japanese War, was a conflict between China and Japan primarily over influence in Korea.
This soon escalated into the First Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895) between Japan and Qing China, fought largely in Korea.

Shanghai

Shanghai, ChinaSHAShanghai Municipality
On March 28, 1894, a pro-Japanese Korean revolutionary, Kim Ok-gyun, was assassinated in Shanghai.
The First Sino-Japanese War concluded with the 1895 Treaty of Shimonoseki, which elevated Japan to become another foreign power in Shanghai.

Self-Strengthening Movement

institutional reformattempts to modernize its militaryself-strengthening
The war demonstrated the failure of the Qing dynasty's attempts to modernize its military and fend off threats to its sovereignty, especially when compared with Japan's successful Meiji Restoration.
Especially after the first Sino-Japanese War, many military leaders saw its importance.

Japanese cruiser Izumi

EsmeraldaIzumiChilean cruiser ''Esmeralda
At the start of hostilities, the Imperial Japanese Navy comprised a fleet of 12 modern warships, (the protected cruiser Izumi being added during the war), eight corvettes, one ironclad warship, 26 torpedo boats, and numerous auxiliary/armed merchant cruisers and converted liners.
She was then sold to Japan as part of Japan's Emergency Fleet Replenishment Programme during the First Sino-Japanese War, and was commissioned into service with the Imperial Japanese Navy on 15 November 1894 as Izumi.

Sasebo, Nagasaki

SaseboSasebo, JapanSasebo City
During peacetime, the warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy were divided among three main naval bases at Yokosuka, Kure and Sasebo and following mobilization, the navy was composed of five divisions of seagoing warships and three flotillas of torpedo boats with a fourth being formed at the beginning of hostilities.
Sasebo Naval District, founded in 1886, became the major port for the Japanese navy in its operations in the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War, and remained a major naval base to the end of World War II.

4th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

IJA 4th Division4th DivisionIJA 4th Infantry Division
The improved five-round-magazine Type 22 was just being introduced and consequently in 1894, on the eve of the war, only the Imperial Guard and 4th Division were equipped with these rifles.
During the First Sino-Japanese War in 1895, the 4th division landed on Liaodong Peninsula and performed security duties as part of army reserve, though its 7th Mixed Brigade was sent to northern Formosa in September 1895 during the Japanese invasion of Taiwan, and helped to pacify the Kapsulan (Yilan) district.

Meiji Restoration

Meiji RevolutionRestorationindustrialization of Japan
The war demonstrated the failure of the Qing dynasty's attempts to modernize its military and fend off threats to its sovereignty, especially when compared with Japan's successful Meiji Restoration.
The military of Japan, strengthened by nationwide conscription and emboldened by military success in both the Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, began to view themselves as a growing world power.

Soh Jaipil

Seo Jae-pilPhilip JaisohnDr. Philip Jaisohn
Its members included Kim Ok-gyun, Pak Yung-hio, Hong Yeong-sik, Seo Gwang-beom, and Soh Jaipil.
In 1894, Japan defeated China in the First Sino-Japanese war which occurred on the Korean Peninsula.

Nagasaki incident

violence
The Nagasaki incident was a riot that took place in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki in 1886.
Combined with the Gapsin coup of 1884 (Meiji 17), this incident stirred up anti-Qing sentiment and was a distant cause to the First Sino-Japanese War.

Fukuzawa Yukichi

Yukichi FukuzawaYukichi
He had been accompanied by Seo Gwang-beom and by Kim Ok-gyun, who later come under the influence of Japanese modernizers such as Fukuzawa Yukichi.
Fukuzawa was later criticized as a supporter of Japanese imperialism because of an essay "Datsu-A Ron" ("Escape from Asia") published in 1885 and posthumously attributed to him, as well as for his support of the First Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895).