First Transcontinental Railroad

transcontinental railroadPacific Railroadrailroadtranscontinentalrailroadstranscontinental railwayFirst American Transcontinental RailroadFirst Transcontinental Railroad (North America)original transcontinental railroadtranscontinental railroads
The First Transcontinental Railroad (known originally as the "Pacific Railroad" and later as the "Overland Route") was a 1,912 mi continuous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 that connected the existing eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa with the Pacific coast at the Oakland Long Wharf on San Francisco Bay.wikipedia
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Oakland, California

OaklandOakland, CACity of Oakland
The Western Pacific Railroad Company built 132 mi of track from the road's western terminus at Alameda/Oakland to Sacramento, California.
In the late 1860s, Oakland was selected as the western terminal of the Transcontinental Railroad.

Central Pacific Railroad

Central PacificCentral Pacific RailwayCentral Pacific Railroad Company
The Central Pacific Railroad Company of California (CPRR) constructed 690 mi eastward from Sacramento to Promontory Summit, Utah Territory. It authorized creation of two companies, the Central Pacific in the west and the Union Pacific in the mid-west, to build the railroad. Four northern California businessmen formed the Central Pacific Railroad: Leland Stanford, (1824–1893), President; Collis Potter Huntington, (1821–1900), Vice President; Mark Hopkins, (1813–1878), Treasurer; Charles Crocker, (1822–1888), Construction Supervisor. These investors became known as The Big Four, and their railroad was called the Central Pacific Railroad.
The Central Pacific Railroad (CPRR) was a rail company chartered by U.S. Congress in 1862 to build a railroad eastwards from Sacramento, California, to complete the western part of the "First Transcontinental Railroad" in North America.

Overland Route (Union Pacific Railroad)

Overland Route
The First Transcontinental Railroad (known originally as the "Pacific Railroad" and later as the "Overland Route") was a 1,912 mi continuous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 that connected the existing eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa with the Pacific coast at the Oakland Long Wharf on San Francisco Bay.
The Overland Route was a train route operated jointly by the Union Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad / Southern Pacific Railroad, between Council Bluffs, Iowa / Omaha, Nebraska, and San Francisco, California over the grade of the First Transcontinental Railroad (aka the "Pacific Railroad") which had been opened on May 10, 1869.

Sacramento, California

SacramentoSacramento, CACity of Sacramento
The Western Pacific Railroad Company built 132 mi of track from the road's western terminus at Alameda/Oakland to Sacramento, California.
As a result of the California Gold Rush, Sacramento became a major commercial center and distribution point for Northern California, serving as the terminus for the Pony Express and the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Alameda, California

AlamedaAlameda, CACity of Alameda
The Western Pacific Railroad Company built 132 mi of track from the road's western terminus at Alameda/Oakland to Sacramento, California.
On September 6, 1869, the Alameda Terminal made history; it was the site of the arrival of the first train via the First Transcontinental Railroad to reach the shores of San Francisco Bay, thus achieving the first coast to coast transcontinental railroad in North America.

History of the Union Pacific Railroad

Union PacificUnion Pacific Railroadconstructing the Union Pacific Railroad
The Union Pacific built 1085 mi from the road's eastern terminus at Council Bluffs near Omaha, Nebraska westward to Promontory Summit.
The two lines were joined together in Utah on May 10, 1869, hence creating the first transcontinental railroad in North America.

Ogden, Utah

OgdenOgden, UTOgden City
The CPRR eventually purchased 53 mi of UPRR-built grade from Promontory Summit (MP 828) to Ogden, Utah Territory (MP 881), which became the interchange point between trains of the two roads.
Ogden is the closest sizable city to the Golden Spike location at Promontory Summit, Utah, where the First Transcontinental Railroad was joined in 1869.

Council Bluffs, Iowa

Council BluffsKanesville, IowaCouncil Bluffs, IA
The First Transcontinental Railroad (known originally as the "Pacific Railroad" and later as the "Overland Route") was a 1,912 mi continuous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 that connected the existing eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa with the Pacific coast at the Oakland Long Wharf on San Francisco Bay.
Council Bluffs (rather than Omaha) was designated by Abraham Lincoln as the official starting point of the transcontinental railroad which was completed in 1869.

Omaha, Nebraska

OmahaOmaha, NEOmaha Film Festival
The Union Pacific built 1085 mi from the road's eastern terminus at Council Bluffs near Omaha, Nebraska westward to Promontory Summit.
Groundbreaking for the First Transcontinental Railroad in 1863, provided an essential developmental boom for the city.

Alameda Terminal

The first transcontinental rail passengers arrived at the Pacific Railroad's original western terminus at the Alameda Terminal on September 6, 1869, where they transferred to the steamer Alameda for transport across the Bay to San Francisco.
By 1869, it served as the original west coast terminus of the U.S. First Transcontinental Railroad.

Theodore Judah

Theodore D. JudahTheodore Dehone JudahJudah
Theodore Judah was a fervent supporter of the central route railroad.
Theodore Dehone Judah (March 4, 1826 – November 2, 1863) was an American railroad and civil engineer who was a central figure in the original promotion, establishment, and design of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Union Pacific Railroad

Union PacificUnion Pacific RailwayUP
It authorized creation of two companies, the Central Pacific in the west and the Union Pacific in the mid-west, to build the railroad.
Founded in 1862, the original Union Pacific Rail Road was part of the First Transcontinental Railroad project, later known as the Overland Route.

Pacific Railroad Acts

Pacific Railroad ActPacific Railway ActPacific Railway Acts
Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 into law on July 1.
The Pacific Railroad Acts of 1862 were a series of acts of Congress that promoted the construction of a "transcontinental railroad" (the Pacific Railroad) in the United States through authorizing the issuance of government bonds and the grants of land to railroad companies.

San Francisco Bay

BaySan FranciscoSan Francisco Harbor
The First Transcontinental Railroad (known originally as the "Pacific Railroad" and later as the "Overland Route") was a 1,912 mi continuous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 that connected the existing eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa with the Pacific coast at the Oakland Long Wharf on San Francisco Bay.
The bay's regional importance increased further when the First Transcontinental Railroad was connected to its western terminus at Alameda on September 6, 1869.

Collis Potter Huntington

Collis P. HuntingtonCollis HuntingtonC. P. Huntington
Four northern California businessmen formed the Central Pacific Railroad: Leland Stanford, (1824–1893), President; Collis Potter Huntington, (1821–1900), Vice President; Mark Hopkins, (1813–1878), Treasurer; Charles Crocker, (1822–1888), Construction Supervisor.
Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker) who invested in Theodore Judah's idea to build the Central Pacific Railroad as part of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad.

Leland Stanford

LelandAmasa Leland StanfordStanford
Four northern California businessmen formed the Central Pacific Railroad: Leland Stanford, (1824–1893), President; Collis Potter Huntington, (1821–1900), Vice President; Mark Hopkins, (1813–1878), Treasurer; Charles Crocker, (1822–1888), Construction Supervisor. The railroad opened for through traffic between Sacramento and Omaha on May 10, 1869, when CPRR President Leland Stanford ceremonially tapped the gold "Last Spike" (later often referred to as the "Golden Spike") with a silver hammer at Promontory Summit.
As head of the railroad company that built the western portion of the "First Transcontinental Railroad" over the Sierra Nevada mountains in California, Nevada, and Utah, Stanford presided at the ceremonial driving of "Last Spike" in Promontory, Utah on May 10, 1869.

Mississippi and Missouri Railroad

M&M
The Mississippi and Missouri Railroad (M&M Railroad) was the first railroad in Iowa and was chartered in 1853 to build a line between Davenport, Iowa, on the Mississippi River and Council Bluffs, Iowa, on the Missouri River and played an important role in the construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Irish Americans

IrishIrish-AmericanIrish American
Most of the semi-skilled workers on the Union Pacific were recruited from the many soldiers discharged from the Union and Confederate armies along with emigrant Irishmen.
However, beginning in the early 19th century, many Irish migrated individually to the interior for work on large-scale infrastructure projects such as canals and, later in the century, railroads.

Big Four (Central Pacific Railroad)

Big FourThe Big Foura consortium
These investors became known as The Big Four, and their railroad was called the Central Pacific Railroad.
"The Big Four" was the name popularly given to the famous and influential businessmen, philanthropists and railroad tycoons who built the Central Pacific Railroad, (C.P.R.R.), which formed the western portion through the Sierra Nevada and the Rocky Mountains of the First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States, built from the mid-continent at the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean during the middle and late 1860s.

Thomas C. Durant

Thomas Clark DurantThomas "Doc" DurantThomas Durant
At the end of 1865, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer of the Union Pacific, resigned over a routing dispute with Thomas C. Durant, one of the chief financiers of the Union Pacific.
This association later played to Durant's favor when in 1862 President Lincoln selected Durant's new company, the Union Pacific, and its operation center in Council Bluffs, Iowa as the starting point of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Charles Crocker

CrockerCharles F. CrockerCrocker, Charles
Four northern California businessmen formed the Central Pacific Railroad: Leland Stanford, (1824–1893), President; Collis Potter Huntington, (1821–1900), Vice President; Mark Hopkins, (1813–1878), Treasurer; Charles Crocker, (1822–1888), Construction Supervisor.
In 1861, after hearing an intriguing presentation by Theodore Judah, he was one of the four principal investors, along with Mark Hopkins, Collis Huntington and Leland Stanford (also known as The Big Four), who formed the Central Pacific Railroad, which constructed the western portion of the First Transcontinental Railroad in North America.

Central Overland Route

Central Nevada RouteCentral Overland California RouteCentral Overland Trail
These lines eventually superseded the original First Transcontinental Telegraph which followed much of the Mormon Trail up the North Platte River and across the very thinly populated Central Nevada Route through central Utah and Nevada.
For a decade after 1859, until the first Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869, it served a vital role in the transport of emigrants, mail, freight, and passengers between California, Nevada, and Utah.

Cedar Rapids and Missouri River Railroad

Cedar Rapids and Missouri RailroadCedar Rapids & Missouri Railroad
First he touted rumors that his fledgling M&M Railroad had a deal in the works, while secretly buying stock in the depressed Cedar Rapids and Missouri Railroad.
It was the first railroad to reach Council Bluffs, Iowa, the eastern terminus of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

John Adams Dix

John A. DixJohn DixDix
Former ophthalmologist Dr. Thomas Clark "Doc" Durant was nominally only a vice president of Union Pacific, so he installed a series of respected men like John Adams Dix as president of the railroad.
In addition to his military and public duties, Dix was the president of the Union Pacific from 1863 to 1868 during construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

John S. Casement

Casement, John S.Casement, John StephenGeneral "Jack" Casement
Former Union General John "Jack" Casement was hired as the new Chief Engineer of the Union Pacific.
He directed the construction of the Union Pacific's section of the Transcontinental Railroad, which linked the Western United States with the East.