Five Ws

Circumstanceswho, what, when, where, why and how5 Wfifth Wfive Wjournalismwh-questionwho, what, when, where, and whywho, what, when, where, why or howwho, what, when, where, why, and how
The Five Ws (sometimes referred to as Five Ws and How, 5W1H, or Six Ws) are questions whose answers are considered basic in information gathering or problem solving.wikipedia
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News style

Burying the Ledejournalistic writingnews writing
They are often mentioned in journalism (cf. news style), research and police investigations.
News writing attempts to answer all the basic questions about any particular event—who, what, when, where and why (the Five Ws) and also often how—at the opening of the article.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
According to the principle of the Five Ws, a report can only be considered complete if it answers these questions starting with an interrogative word:
They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh- (compare Five Ws).

Hermagoras of Temnos

Hermagoras
The Five Ws and How were long attributed to Hermagoras of Temnos. Hermagoras went so far as to claim that all hypotheses are derived from these seven circumstances. The rhetor Hermagoras of Temnos, as quoted in pseudo-Augustine's De Rhetorica, applied Aristotle's "elements of circumstances" as the loci of an issue:
Hermagoras' method of dividing a topic into its "seven circumstances" (who, what, when, where, why, in what way, by what means) provided the roots of the "5 W's" used widely in journalism, education, and police investigation to ensure thoroughness in the coverage of a particular incident or subject matter.

Lead paragraph

ledeleadbegan his piece
By 1917, the "Five Ws" were being taught in high-school journalism classes, and by 1940, the tendency of journalists to address all of the "Five Ws" within the lead paragraph of an article was being characterized as old-fashioned and fallacious:
Most standard news leads include brief answers to the questions of who, what, why, when, where, and how the key event in the story took place.

5 Whys

Five Whys5 Why’s5-whys
Starting in the 2000s, the Five W's were sometimes misattributed to Kipling, especially in the management and quality literature, and contrasted with the 5 Whys.
Five Ws (information-gathering)

Journalism

journalistreportagejournalistic
They are often mentioned in journalism (cf. news style), research and police investigations.

Research

researcherresearchersoriginal research
They are often mentioned in journalism (cf. news style), research and police investigations.

Police

policingpolice forcepolice department
They are often mentioned in journalism (cf. news style), research and police investigations.

Yes and no

noyesyes" or "no
Importantly, none of these questions can be answered with a simple "yes" or "no".

Key Stage 2

KS22key stage 2 (KS2)
In the United Kingdom (excluding Scotland), the Five Ws are used in Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 lessons.

Key Stage 3

KS33key stage 3 (KS3)
In the United Kingdom (excluding Scotland), the Five Ws are used in Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 lessons.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelianismAristote
But in 2010, Sloan established Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics as the source of the elements of circumstance or Septem Circumstantiae.

Nicomachean Ethics

EthicsEthica NicomacheaAristotle's ''Ethics
But in 2010, Sloan established Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics as the source of the elements of circumstance or Septem Circumstantiae.

Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas AquinasAquinasSaint Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas had much earlier acknowledged Aristotle as the originator of the elements of circumstances, providing a detailed commentary on Aristotle 's system in his “Treatise on human acts” and specifically in part one of two Q7 “Of the Circumstances of Human Acts”. St. Thomas Aquinas also refers to the elements as used by Cicero in De Inventione (Chap.

Politics (Aristotle)

PoliticsAristotlePolitica
And it seems that the most important circumstances are those just listed, including the Why In the Politics, Aristotle illustrates why the elements are important in terms of human (moral) action.

Hypothesis

hypotheseshypotheticalhypothesized
Hermagoras went so far as to claim that all hypotheses are derived from these seven circumstances.

Pseudo-Augustine

The rhetor Hermagoras of Temnos, as quoted in pseudo-Augustine's De Rhetorica, applied Aristotle's "elements of circumstances" as the loci of an issue:

Inventio

stasistopoiInvention
The rhetor Hermagoras of Temnos, as quoted in pseudo-Augustine's De Rhetorica, applied Aristotle's "elements of circumstances" as the loci of an issue:

Cicero

Marcus Tullius CiceroTullyCicero’s
St. Thomas Aquinas also refers to the elements as used by Cicero in De Inventione (Chap. Victorinus explained Cicero's application of the elements of circumstances by putting them into correspondence with Hermagoras's questions:

Quintilian

QuintillianMarcus Fabius Quintilianus Quintilian
24 DD1, 104) as: Quis, quid, ubi, quibus auxiliis, cur, quomodo, quando. Similarly, Quintilian discussed loci argumentorum, but did not put them in the form of questions.

Gaius Marius Victorinus

VictorinusMarius Victorinus
Victorinus explained Cicero's application of the elements of circumstances by putting them into correspondence with Hermagoras's questions:

Gaius Julius Victor

Julius Victor also lists circumstances as questions.

Boethius

BoëthiusBoetiusAnicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
Boethius "made the seven circumstances fundamental to the arts of prosecution and defense":

Thierry of Chartres

Thierry of Chartres/Theodoricus Carnotensis
The question form was taken up again in the 12th century by Thierry de Chartres and John of Salisbury.

John of Salisbury

Joannes SaresberiensisJohn Sarisbiensis
The question form was taken up again in the 12th century by Thierry de Chartres and John of Salisbury.