Wright brothers' home at 7 Hawthorn Street, Dayton about 1900. Wilbur and Orville built the covered wrap-around porch in the 1890s.
A Boeing 737 airliner is an example of a fixed-wing aircraft
The Wright brothers' bicycle at the National Air and Space Museum
Delta (triangular) kite
Wright 1899 kite: front and side views, with control sticks. Wing-warping is shown in lower view. (Wright brothers drawing in Library of Congress)
Boys flying a kite in 1828 Bavaria, by Johann Michael Voltz
Park Ranger Tom White demonstrates a replica of the Wright brothers 1899 box kite at the Wright Brothers National Memorial
Le Bris and his glider, Albatros II, photographed by Nadar, 1868
Chanute's hang glider of 1896. The pilot may be Augustus Herring.
Wright Flyer III piloted by Orville Wright over Huffman Prairie, 4 October 1905
The 1900 glider. No photo was taken with a pilot aboard.
Santos-Dumont's self-propelled 14-bis on an old postcard
Replica of the Wright brothers' wind tunnel at the Virginia Air and Space Center
Curtiss NC-4 flying boat after it completed the first crossing of the Atlantic in 1919, standing next to a fixed-wing heavier-than-air aircraft
At left, 1901 glider flown by Wilbur (left) and Orville. At right, 1902 glider flown by Wilbur (right) and Dan Tate, their helper. Dramatic improvement in performance is apparent. The 1901 glider flies at a steep angle of attack due to poor lift and high drag. In contrast, the 1902 glider flies at a much flatter angle and holds up its tether lines almost vertically, clearly demonstrating a much better lift-to-drag ratio.
Aircraft parked on the ground in Afghanistan
Wilbur Wright pilots the 1902 glider over the Kill Devil Hills, October 10, 1902. The single rear rudder is steerable; it replaced the original fixed double rudder.
A glider (sailplane) being winch-launched
Wilbur makes a turn using wing-warping and the movable rudder, October 24, 1902.
Ultralight "airchair" Goat 1 glider
A Wright engine, serial number 17, c. 1910, on display at the New England Air Museum
A 1943 USAAF Waco CG-4A
The first flight of the Wright Flyer, December 17, 1903, Orville piloting, Wilbur running at wingtip.
Hang gliding
famous photograph
A kite in flight
Orville's notebook entry of December 17, 1903
Chinese dragon kite more than one hundred feet long which flew in the Berkeley, California, kite festival in 2000
Orville in flight over Huffman Prairie in Wright Flyer II. Flight 85, approximately 1760 ft in 40 1⁄5 seconds, November 16, 1904.
A quad-line traction kite, commonly used as a power source for kite surfing
Wilbur flying almost four circles of Huffman Prairie, about 2 3⁄4 miles in 5 minutes 4 seconds; flight 82, November 9, 1904.
Train of connected kites
Wilbur's logbook showing diagram and data for first circle flight on September 20, 1904
The IAI Heron is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a twin-boom configuration
Wright Flyer III piloted by Orville over Huffman Prairie, October 4, 1905. Flight #46, covering 20 3⁄4 miles in 33 minutes 17 seconds; the last photographed flight of the year
The An-225 Mriya, the largest airplane in the world, which can carry a 250-tonne payload, has two vertical stabilizers
The Dayton Daily News reported the October 5 flight on page 9, with agriculture and business news.
Captured Morane-Saulnier L wire-braced parasol monoplane
The modified 1905 Flyer at the Kill Devil Hills in 1908, ready for practice flights. Note there is no catapult derrick; all takeoffs were used with the monorail alone.
Two Dassault Mirage G prototypes, one with wings swept (top)
Soaring flight, Kitty Hawk, Oct. 1911 "Arrows indicate [the] 50 mile[ per hour] wind, showing how [the] machine was sustained in a stationary position".
The US-produced B-2 Spirit, a strategic bomber capable of intercontinental missions, has a flying wing configuration
Orville demonstrating the flyer to the U.S. Army, Fort Myer, Virginia September 1908. Photo: by C.H. Claudy.
Computer-generated model of the Boeing X-48
Hart O. Berg (left), the Wrights' European business agent, and Wilbur at the flying field near Le Mans.
The Martin Aircraft Company X-24 was built as part of a 1963–1975 experimental US military program
The Fort Myer crash. Photo by C.H. Claudy.
Canards on the Saab Viggen
The Wright Model A Flyer flown by Wilbur 1908–1909 and launching derrick, France, 1909
Typical light aircraft (Cessna 150M) cockpit with control yokes
Wrights' 1906 US patent 821393
The six basic flight instruments. Top row (left to right): airspeed indicator, attitude indicator, altimeter. Bottom row (left to right): turn coordinator, heading indicator, vertical speed indicator.
The Wright brothers at the Belmont Park Aviation Meet in 1910 near New York
Elwood Doherty, a Curtiss pilot, coaxes the structurally modified Langley Aerodrome into the air above the surface of Keuka Lake near Hammondsport, New York, September 17, 1914.
Pieces of fabric and wood from the 1903 Wright Flyer traveled to the Moon in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle, and are exhibited at the Wright Brothers National Memorial
The original 1903 Wright Flyer in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
The back of the US Airman Certificate with a picture of the Wright brothers.
Orville Wright, 1928
The Wright family plot at Woodland Cemetery and Arboretum
Aircraft certification for the Ingenuity helicopter on Mars, April 2021

In 1904–1905, the Wright brothers developed their flying machine to make longer-running and more aerodynamic flights with the Wright Flyer II, followed by the first truly practical fixed-wing aircraft, the Wright Flyer III.

- Wright brothers

The Wright brothers' flights in 1903 with their Flyer I are recognized by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), the standard setting and record-keeping body for aeronautics, as "the first sustained and controlled heavier-than-air powered flight".

- Fixed-wing aircraft
Wright brothers' home at 7 Hawthorn Street, Dayton about 1900. Wilbur and Orville built the covered wrap-around porch in the 1890s.

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North American P-51 Mustang, a World War II fighter aircraft

Airplane

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North American P-51 Mustang, a World War II fighter aircraft
The first flight of an airplane, the Wright Flyer on December 17, 1903
An All Nippon Airways Boeing 777-300ER taking off from New York JFK Airport
Le Bris and his glider, Albatros II, photographed by Nadar, 1868
Otto Lilienthal in mid-flight, c. 1895
Patent drawings of Clement Ader's Éole.
Santos-Dumont 14-bis, between 1906 and 1907
The Concorde supersonic transport aircraft
An Antonov An-2 biplane
Solar Impulse 1, a solar-powered aircraft with electric motors.
Artist's concept of X-43A with scramjet attached to the underside
Bell X-1 in flight, 1947
Assembly line of the SR-71 Blackbird at Skunk Works, Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Development Programs (ADP).
An Airbus A321 on final assembly line 3 in the Airbus Hamburg-Finkenwerder plant.
An IAI Heron - an unmanned aerial vehicle with a twin-boom configuration
The An-225 Mriya, which can carry a 250-tonne payload, has two vertical stabilizers.
Captured Morane-Saulnier L wire-braced parasol monoplane
Two Dassault Mirage G prototypes, one with wings swept
The US-produced B-2 Spirit is a strategic bomber. It has a flying wing configuration and is capable of intercontinental missions
Computer-generated model of the Boeing X-48
The Martin Aircraft Company X-24 was built as part of a 1963 to 1975 experimental US military program.
Canards on the Saab Viggen
A light aircraft (Robin DR400/500) cockpit
Water vapor contrails left by high-altitude jet airliners. These may contribute to cirrus cloud formation.

An airplane or aeroplane (informally plane) is a fixed-wing aircraft that is propelled forward by thrust from a jet engine, propeller, or rocket engine.

The Wright brothers invented and flew the first airplane in 1903, recognized as "the first sustained and controlled heavier-than-air powered flight".

Single-seat high performance fiberglass Glaser-Dirks DG-808 glider over the Lac de Serre Ponçon in the French Alps

Glider (aircraft)

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Single-seat high performance fiberglass Glaser-Dirks DG-808 glider over the Lac de Serre Ponçon in the French Alps
Aerobatic glider with tip smoke, pictured on July 2, 2005 in Lappeenranta, Finland
Otto Lilienthal in flight
Smallest glider in the world - BrO-18 "Boružė" (Ladybird), constructed in Lithuania in 1975
Ultralight "airchair" Sandlin Goat 1 glider
Modern 'flexible wing' hang glider.
A paraglider taking off in Brazil
Waco CG-4A of the USAF
Horten Ho IV flying wing sailplane prone seating glider
Me 163B on display at the National Museum of the USAF

A glider is a fixed-wing aircraft that is supported in flight by the dynamic reaction of the air against its lifting surfaces, and whose free flight does not depend on an engine.

The Wright Brothers developed a series of three manned gliders after preliminary tests with a kite as they worked towards achieving powered flight.

A Saab 37 Viggen, the first modern canard aircraft to go into production

Canard (aeronautics)

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A Saab 37 Viggen, the first modern canard aircraft to go into production
The 1906 Santos-Dumont 14-bis
The Wright Flyer of 1903 was a canard biplane
Curtiss-Wright XP-55 Ascender
The Kyūshū J7W1 Shinden (scale model)
XB-70 Valkyrie experimental bomber
Canards visible on a JAS 39 Gripen
Canards on a Su-47
Su-34, with canards
Rutan Long-EZ, with high-aspect-ratio lifting canard and suspended luggage pods
The control canard on an RAF Typhoon in flight
Pterodactyl Ascender II+2 with stabilizing canard
Su-33s with canard
Tu-144 with the retractable canards deployed and nose drooped
A Dassault Rafale in high angle-of-attack flight
The Beechcraft Starship has variable-sweep foreplanes.
B-1B Lancer showing left hand ride-control vane at nose

In aeronautics, a canard is a wing configuration in which a small forewing or foreplane is placed forward of the main wing of a fixed-wing aircraft or a weapon.

The Wright Brothers began experimenting with the foreplane configuration around 1900.