A report on Floppy disk

8-inch, 5¼-inch, and 3½-inch floppy disks
8-inch, 5¼-inch (full height), and 3½-inch drives
A 3½-inch floppy disk removed from its housing
8-inch floppy disk,
inserted in drive,
(3½-inch floppy diskette,
in front, shown for scale)
3½-inch, high-density floppy diskettes with adhesive labels affixed
Imation USB floppy drive, model 01946: an external drive that accepts high-density disks
Front and rear of a retail 3½-inch and 5¼-inch floppy disk cleaning kit, as sold in Australia at retailer Big W, circa early 1990s
Different data storage media (Examples include: Flash drive, CD, Tape drive, and CompactFlash)
A floppy hardware emulator, same size as a 3½-inch drive, provides a USB interface to the user
Screenshot depicting a floppy disk as "save" icon
Inside the 8-inch floppy disk
Disk notcher converts single-sided 5¼-inch diskettes to double-sided.
Rear side of a 3½-inch floppy disk in a transparent case, showing its internal parts
The spindle motor from a 3½‑inch unit
A read-write head from a 3½‑inch unit
How the read-write head is applied on the floppy
Visualization of magnetic information on floppy disk (image recorded with CMOS-MagView)
8-inch floppy disk
A 3 1⁄2-inch floppy disk drive
A box of about 80 floppy disks together with one USB memory stick. The stick is capable of holding over 130 times as much data as the entire box of disks put together.

Obsolete type of disk storage composed of a thin and flexible disk of a magnetic storage medium in a square or nearly square plastic enclosure lined with a fabric that removes dust particles from the spinning disk.

- Floppy disk
8-inch, 5¼-inch, and 3½-inch floppy disks

58 related topics with Alpha

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A SanDisk Cruzer USB drive from 2011, with 4 GB of storage capacity

USB flash drive

6 links

Data storage device that includes flash memory with an integrated USB interface.

Data storage device that includes flash memory with an integrated USB interface.

A SanDisk Cruzer USB drive from 2011, with 4 GB of storage capacity
A SanDisk Ultra Flair USB drive from 2020, attached to an HP laptop
A Kingston card reader which accepts Micro SD memory cards (Transcend card shown partially inserted), and acts as a USB flash drive
The internal mechanical and electronic parts of a Kingston 2 GB flash drive
The front and rear side of a USB flash drive with the casing removed
Flash drives come in various shapes and sizes, sometimes bulky or novelty, such as the shape of ikura gunkan-maki.
A USB flash drive in the shape of a key
Assortment of USB flash drives
A contemporary thumb drive styled solid-state digital audio player (Sony Walkman B180 Series)
The German band Wizo's Stick EP, released in 2004, was the first album released on a USB stick.
Ubuntu-branded USB flash drive and lanyard.
Punched cards in storage at a U.S. Federal records center in 1959. All the data visible here could fit on a single flash drive.
Size comparison of a flash drive and a 3.5-inch floppy disk. The flash drive can hold about 11,380 times more data.
Three different Micro Center-branded digital media, showing a USB flash drive, an SD card, and a Micro-SD card, all having a capacity of 8 GiB, next to a U.S 5-cent coin for size comparison
The internals of a 32 GB Toshiba USB 3.0 flash drive. The USB 3.0 standard is becoming increasingly popular. This drive has a write speed of 60 MB/s and a read speed of 120 MB/s, making it faster than the USB 2.0 standard.

Compared with floppy disks or CDs, they are smaller, faster, have significantly more capacity, and are more durable due to a lack of moving parts.

1 GiB of SDRAM mounted in a computer. An example of primary storage.

Computer data storage

4 links

Technology consisting of computer components and recording media that are used to retain digital data.

Technology consisting of computer components and recording media that are used to retain digital data.

1 GiB of SDRAM mounted in a computer. An example of primary storage.
15 GB PATA hard disk drive (HDD) from 1999. When connected to a computer it serves as secondary storage.
160 GB SDLT tape cartridge, an example of off-line storage. When used within a robotic tape library, it is classified as tertiary storage instead.
Read/Write DVD drive with cradle for media extended
Various forms of storage, divided according to their distance from the central processing unit. The fundamental components of a general-purpose computer are arithmetic and logic unit, control circuitry, storage space, and input/output devices. Technology and capacity as in common home computers around 2005.
A hard disk drive (HDD) with protective cover removed
A large tape library, with tape cartridges placed on shelves in the front, and a robotic arm moving in the back. The visible height of the library is about 180 cm.
A 1 GiB module of laptop DDR2 RAM
S.M.A.R.T. software warning suggests impending hard drive failure
Error rate measurement on a DVD+R. The minor errors are correctable and within a healthy range.

Other examples of secondary storage technologies include USB flash drives, floppy disks, magnetic tape, paper tape, punched cards, and RAM disks.

Group coded recording

3 links

In computer science, group coded recording or group code recording (GCR) refers to several distinct but related encoding methods for representing data on magnetic media.

In computer science, group coded recording or group code recording (GCR) refers to several distinct but related encoding methods for representing data on magnetic media.

The others are different mainframe hard disk as well as floppy disk encoding methods used in some microcomputers until the late 1980s.

Zip 100 drive

Zip drive

3 links

Removable floppy disk storage system that was introduced by Iomega in late 1994.

Removable floppy disk storage system that was introduced by Iomega in late 1994.

Zip 100 drive
Zip 100 drive
Zip 100 drive
An internal Zip drive installed in a computer
Zip 100 drive
An internal Zip drive outside of a computer but attached to a 3 1⁄2-inch to 5 1⁄4-inch drive bay adapter
The Zip disk media
Back of the ZIP-100 with parallel port printer pass-through
Later (USB, left) and earlier (parallel, right) Zip drives (media in foreground).
Zip Disk and Drive sales, 1998 to 2003

However, it was never popular enough to replace the 3 1⁄2-inch floppy disk.

Sony

3 links

Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo, Japan.

Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo, Japan.

A Sony TR-730 transistor radio made in Japan, circa 1960
Sony Store in Nagoya, Japan
A rare Japanese market Betamax TV/VCR combo, the Model SL-MV1
First Sony Walkman TPS-L2 from 1979 (Expo in Sony Building at Ginza, Chuo-Ku, Tokyo)
Front side of a Sony 200GB Blu-ray disc
Sony at Westfield Riccarton shopping centre in Christchurch, New Zealand
The logo of Bravia television. Its backronym is "Best Resolution Audio Visual Integrated Architecture".
Notebook Sony Vaio. Sony has axed its loss-making PC business in 2014.
Xperia, the product device name for a range of smartphones from Sony.
Sony Interactive Entertainment headquarters in San Mateo, California
The PlayStation 2 is the best-selling video game console of all time
Sony Pictures Plaza, next to the main studio lot of Sony Pictures in Culver City, California
The main entrance to the Sony Pictures Entertainment studio lot in Culver City
Sony Music Entertainment headquarters in New York City, United States
Headquarters of Sony Financial Group in Tokyo, Japan

Sony (either alone or with partners) has introduced several of the most popular recording formats, including the 3.5-inch floppy disk, Compact Disc and Blu-ray Disc.

Six hard disk drives

Disk storage

2 links

General category of storage mechanisms where data is recorded by various electronic, magnetic, optical, or mechanical changes to a surface layer of one or more rotating disks.

General category of storage mechanisms where data is recorded by various electronic, magnetic, optical, or mechanical changes to a surface layer of one or more rotating disks.

Six hard disk drives
Three floppy disk drives
A CD-ROM (optical) disc drive
Comparison of several forms of disk storage showing tracks (not-to-scale); green denotes start and red denotes end.
 Some CD-R(W) and DVD-R(W)/DVD+R(W) recorders operate in ZCLV, CAA or CAV modes.

Notable types are the hard disk drive (HDD) containing a non-removable disk, the floppy disk drive (FDD) and its removable floppy disk, and various optical disc drives (ODD) and associated optical disc media.

A screenshot of CP/M-86

CP/M

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Mass-market operating system created in 1974 for Intel 8080/85-based microcomputers by Gary Kildall of Digital Research, Inc. Initially confined to single-tasking on 8-bit processors and no more than 64 kilobytes of memory, later versions of CP/M added multi-user variations and were migrated to 16-bit processors.

Mass-market operating system created in 1974 for Intel 8080/85-based microcomputers by Gary Kildall of Digital Research, Inc. Initially confined to single-tasking on 8-bit processors and no more than 64 kilobytes of memory, later versions of CP/M added multi-user variations and were migrated to 16-bit processors.

A screenshot of CP/M-86
CP/M advertisement in the 29 November 1982 issue of InfoWorld magazine
Apple CP/M Card with manual
CP/M Plus (CP/M 3) System Guide
DEC PRO-CP/M-80 floppy-disk distribution for the Z80-A co-processor in a DEC Professional 3xx series
Sanco 8001 computer, running under CP/M 2.2 (1982)
CP/M cartridge for the Commodore 64
Screenshot showing a CP/M 3.0 directory listing using the command on a Commodore 128 home computer
CP/M advertisement in the 11 December 1978, issue of InfoWorld magazine
Distribution 5 1/4 inch diskettes and packaging for the last version (version 4) of WordStar word processing program released for 8-bit CP/M
MBASIC text output displayed on a monochrome monitor typical for that time.
CP/M derivate SCP running on an East German robotron PC 1715
CP/J version 2.21 running on an Elwro 804 Junior

Gary Kildall originally developed CP/M during 1974, as an operating system to run on an Intel Intellec-8 development system, equipped with a Shugart Associates 8-inch floppy-disk drive interfaced via a custom floppy-disk controller.

The optical lens of a compact disc drive.

Optical disc

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Optical disc is a flat, usually circular disc that encodes binary data (bits) in the form of pits and lands on a special material, often aluminum, on one of its flat surfaces.

Optical disc is a flat, usually circular disc that encodes binary data (bits) in the form of pits and lands on a special material, often aluminum, on one of its flat surfaces.

The optical lens of a compact disc drive.
The bottom surface of a 12 cm compact disc (CD-R), showing characteristic iridescence.
LaserCard made by Drexler Technology Corporation.
An earlier analog optical disc recorded in 1935 for Lichttonorgel (sampling organ)
Comparison of various optical storage media
Error rate measurement on a DVD+R. The error rate is still within a healthy range.

Unlike the 31⁄2-inch floppy disk, most optical discs do not have an integrated protective casing and are therefore susceptible to data transfer problems due to scratches, fingerprints, and other environmental problems.

Imation SuperDisk drive

SuperDisk

2 links

Imation SuperDisk drive
An LS-120 disk
Circuit components of the external USB SuperDisk for Macintosh. The drive itself is the same size as a standard 3.5" floppy drive, but uses an ATA interface. On the right is the USB-to-ATA adapter, which plugs into an intermediate fan-out and power supply daughterboard that is inside the rear of the Mac drive's casing. This particular drive cannot function using USB power alone.
This shows the technology of the SuperDisk drive. Two voice coil servomotors move the drive heads precisely across the disk surface.
BLUE - The main servo with a large coil provides the primary force to move the head mechanism.
YELLOW - A secondary smaller coil primarily acts to keep the head mechanism aligned parallel with the disk surface.
RED - The drive eject motor allows the disk to be under computer control so that it normally will not eject until the computer has completed its read or writing tasks.
Imation Super Disk LS-120
SuperDisk Drive
Super Disk 120MB
Super Disk 120MB

The SuperDisk LS-120 is a high-speed, high-capacity alternative to the 90 mm (3.5 in), 1.44 MB floppy disk.

IBM PC DOS command line

IBM PC DOS

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Acronym for IBM Personal Computer Disk Operating System, is a discontinued disk operating system for IBM PC compatibles.

Acronym for IBM Personal Computer Disk Operating System, is a discontinued disk operating system for IBM PC compatibles.

IBM PC DOS command line
User manual and diskette for IBM PC DOS 1.1

86-DOS had to be converted from 8-inch to 5.25-inch floppy disks and integrated with the BIOS, which Microsoft was helping IBM to write.