Flourishing

flourish
Flourishing is "a state where people experience positive emotions, positive psychological functioning and positive social functioning, most of the time," living "within an optimal range of human functioning." It is a descriptor and measure of positive mental health and overall life well-being, and includes multiple components and concepts, such as cultivating strengths, subjective well-being, "goodness, generativity, growth, and resilience." Flourishing is the opposite of both pathology and languishing, which are described as living a life that feels hollow and empty.wikipedia
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Positive psychology

positive psychologistpositivePositive psychological
It is a central concept in positive psychology, developed by Corey Keyes and Barbara Fredrickson.
Positive psychology is concerned with eudaimonia, "the good life" or flourishing, living according to what holds the greatest value in life – the factors that contribute the most to a well-lived and fulfilling life.

Happiness

happyenjoymentJolly
Flourishing people are happy and satisfied; they tend to see their lives as having a purpose; they feel some degree of mastery and accept all parts of themselves; they have a sense of personal growth in the sense that they are always growing, evolving, and changing; finally, they have a sense of autonomy and an internal locus of control, they chose their fate in life instead of being victims of fate.
For instance Sonja Lyubomirsky has described happiness as “the experience of joy, contentment, or positive well-being, combined with a sense that one's life is good, meaningful, and worthwhile.” Eudaimonia, is a Greek term variously translated as happiness, welfare, flourishing, and blessedness.

Eudaimonia

the good lifeEudaimonismeudaemonia
Flourishing is related to the Aristotelian concept of eudaimonia.
Eudaimonia (Greek: εὐδαιμονία ), sometimes anglicized as eudaemonia or eudemonia, is a Greek word commonly translated as happiness or welfare; however, "human flourishing or prosperity" and "blessedness" have been proposed as more accurate translations.

Corey Keyes

"Flourishing" as a psychological concept has been developed by Corey Keyes and Barbara Fredrickson.
Keyes is known for coining the psychological term "flourishing" which describes mentally healthy adults and has published widely in this field.

Subjective well-being

tripartite model of subjective well-beingsubjective wellbeingemotional wellbeing
It is a descriptor and measure of positive mental health and overall life well-being, and includes multiple components and concepts, such as cultivating strengths, subjective well-being, "goodness, generativity, growth, and resilience."

Six-factor Model of Psychological Well-being

psychological well-beingCarol Ryff's Six-factor Model of Psychological Well-beingpsychological well being
Keyes collaborated with Carol Ryff in testing her Six-factor Model of Psychological Well-being, and in 2002 published his theoretical considerations in an article on The Mental Health Continuum: From Languishing to Flourishing, qualified by Fredrickson as "path-breaking work that measures mental health in positive terms rather than by the absence of mental illness."

Descriptor

It is a descriptor and measure of positive mental health and overall life well-being, and includes multiple components and concepts, such as cultivating strengths, subjective well-being, "goodness, generativity, growth, and resilience."

Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
It is a descriptor and measure of positive mental health and overall life well-being, and includes multiple components and concepts, such as cultivating strengths, subjective well-being, "goodness, generativity, growth, and resilience."

Pathology

pathologistpathologicalpathologies
Flourishing is the opposite of both pathology and languishing, which are described as living a life that feels hollow and empty.

Mental health

behavioral healthmentalmental hygiene
According to Keyes, mental health does not imply an absence of mental illness.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
According to Keyes, mental health does not imply an absence of mental illness.

Skill

skillscompetenceSkillset
Flourishing people are happy and satisfied; they tend to see their lives as having a purpose; they feel some degree of mastery and accept all parts of themselves; they have a sense of personal growth in the sense that they are always growing, evolving, and changing; finally, they have a sense of autonomy and an internal locus of control, they chose their fate in life instead of being victims of fate.

Evolution

evolvedtheory of evolutionevolutionary
Flourishing people are happy and satisfied; they tend to see their lives as having a purpose; they feel some degree of mastery and accept all parts of themselves; they have a sense of personal growth in the sense that they are always growing, evolving, and changing; finally, they have a sense of autonomy and an internal locus of control, they chose their fate in life instead of being victims of fate.

Autonomy

autonomousnational autonomysemi-autonomous
Flourishing people are happy and satisfied; they tend to see their lives as having a purpose; they feel some degree of mastery and accept all parts of themselves; they have a sense of personal growth in the sense that they are always growing, evolving, and changing; finally, they have a sense of autonomy and an internal locus of control, they chose their fate in life instead of being victims of fate.

Locus of control

Internal locus of controlcontrolLoss of control
Flourishing people are happy and satisfied; they tend to see their lives as having a purpose; they feel some degree of mastery and accept all parts of themselves; they have a sense of personal growth in the sense that they are always growing, evolving, and changing; finally, they have a sense of autonomy and an internal locus of control, they chose their fate in life instead of being victims of fate.

Good and evil

goodgood versus evilgoodness
According to Fredrickson and Losada, flourishing is characterized by four main components: goodness, generative, growth, and resilience.

Psychological resilience

resilienceresiliencyresilient
According to Fredrickson and Losada, flourishing is characterized by four main components: goodness, generative, growth, and resilience.

Neo-Aristotelianism

Neo-Aristotelian
According to a Neo-Aristotelian view, the concept of human flourishing offers a view of the human good that is objective, inclusive, individualized, agent-relative, self-directed and social.

Potential

human potentialpotential fieldpotential function
It comes from engaging in activities that both express and produce the actualization of one's potential.

Barbara Fredrickson

"Flourishing" as a psychological concept has been developed by Corey Keyes and Barbara Fredrickson.

Carol Ryff

Ryff
Keyes collaborated with Carol Ryff in testing her Six-factor Model of Psychological Well-being, and in 2002 published his theoretical considerations in an article on The Mental Health Continuum: From Languishing to Flourishing, qualified by Fredrickson as "path-breaking work that measures mental health in positive terms rather than by the absence of mental illness."

Theory

theoreticaltheoriestheorist
Previous theories of emotion stated that all emotions are associated with urges to act in particular ways, called action-tendencies.

Emotion

emotionsemotionalemotional state
Previous theories of emotion stated that all emotions are associated with urges to act in particular ways, called action-tendencies.

Psychologist

psychologistsclinical psychologistresearch psychologist
Fredrickson proposes that instead of one general theory of emotions, psychologists should develop theories for each emotion or for subsets of emotions.