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J. K. Paasikivi, the President of Finland, was remembered as a main architect of Finland's foreign policy with the Soviet Union after the Second World War. From left to right: President Paasikivi and Soviet head of state Kliment Voroshilov in Moscow.
The field of international relations dates from the time of the Greek historian Thucydides.
The official portraits of King Władysław IV dressed according to French, Spanish and Polish fashion reflects the complex politics of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth during the Thirty Years' War.
Empires of the world in 1910
NATO International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan
The United Nations Secretariat Building at the United Nations headquarters in New York City
The World Bank headquarters in Washington, D.C.
NATO E-3A flying with USAF F-16s in a NATO exercise

It examines all activities between states—such as war, diplomacy, trade, and foreign policy—as well as relations with and among other international actors, such as intergovernmental organisations (IGOs), international nongovernmental organisations (INGOs), international legal bodies, and multinational corporations (MNCs).

- International relations

Although originally intended to describe short term management of a specific concern, these departments now manage all day-to-day and long-term international relations among states.

- Foreign policy
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3 related topics

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The two superpowers of the Cold War. In green the Soviet Union, in orange the United States.

Superpower

State with a dominant position characterized by its extensive ability to exert influence or project power on a global scale.

State with a dominant position characterized by its extensive ability to exert influence or project power on a global scale.

The two superpowers of the Cold War. In green the Soviet Union, in orange the United States.
Prime Minister Winston Churchill, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and General Secretary Joseph Stalin, meeting at the Yalta Conference in Crimea in February 1945, near the end of World War II.
A world map in 1945. According to William T.R. Fox, the United States (blue), the Soviet Union (red) and the British Empire (teal) were superpowers
Countries with the military bases and facilities of the present sole superpower - the United States
Major economies from 1 AD to 2003 AD according to Angus Maddison's estimates
The New York Stock Exchange trading floor (economic power such as a large nominal GDP and a world reserve currency are important factors in projection of hard power)

This is done through the combined means of economic, military, technological, political and cultural strength as well as diplomatic and soft power influence.

The 1956 Suez Crisis suggested that Britain, financially weakened by two world wars, could not then pursue its foreign policy objectives on an equal footing with the new superpowers without sacrificing convertibility of its reserve currency as a central goal of policy.

Joseph Nye's 2004 book describing the concept of "soft power"

Soft power

Joseph Nye's 2004 book describing the concept of "soft power"
The supersonic jet Concorde arrives in Ivory Coast, a former French colony, in 1978. Concorde was often used as a symbol of French prestige and a vessel of soft power.

In politics (and particularly in international politics), soft power is the ability to co-opt rather than coerce (contrast hard power).

A defining feature of soft power is that it is non-coercive; the currency of soft power includes culture, political values, and foreign policies.

The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization.

Diplomacy

Diplomacy comprises spoken or written speech acts by representatives of states (such as leaders and diplomats) intended to influence events in the international system.

Diplomacy comprises spoken or written speech acts by representatives of states (such as leaders and diplomats) intended to influence events in the international system.

The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization.
Ger van Elk, Symmetry of Diplomacy, 1975, Groninger Museum.
The Egyptian–Hittite peace treaty, between the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt and the Hittite Empire of Anatolia
stone tablet fragments
A French ambassador in Ottoman dress, painted by Antoine de Favray, 1766, Pera Museum, Istanbul.
Portraits of Periodical Offering, a 6th-century Chinese painting portraying various emissaries; ambassadors depicted in the painting ranging from those of Hephthalites, Persia to Langkasuka, Baekje(part of the modern Korea), Qiuci, and Wo (Japan).
India's Diplomatic Personnel
Omurtag, ruler of Bulgaria, sends delegation to Byzantine emperor Michael II (Madrid Skylitzes, Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid).
French diplomat Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord is considered one of the most skilled diplomats of all time.
The First Geneva Convention (1864). Geneva (Switzerland) is the city that hosts the highest number of international organizations in the world.
Frontispiece of the Acts of the Congress of Vienna.
Brazilian President Prudente de Morais shakes hands with King Carlos I of Portugal during the re-establishment of diplomatic relations between Brazil and Portugal after talks mediated by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, 16 March 1895.
Anton von Werner, Congress of Berlin (1881): Final meeting at the Reich Chancellery on 13 July 1878.
Celebrating the signing of the Camp David Accords: Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter, Anwar El Sadat
Czech (originally Czechoslovak) Embassy in Berlin.
The ministers of foreign affairs of the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, Germany, France, China, the European Union and Iran negotiating in Lausanne for a Comprehensive agreement on the Iranian nuclear programme (30 March 2015).
The Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation at 53/2 Ostozhenka Street in Moscow.

Diplomacy is the main instrument of foreign policy and global governance which represents the broader goals and strategies that guide a state's interactions with the rest of the world.

International treaties, agreements, alliances, and other manifestations of international relations are usually the result of diplomatic negotiations and processes.