Foreign policy of the United States

U.S. foreign policyAmerican foreign policyforeign policyUS foreign policyUnited States foreign policycongressional-executive agreementAmerican diplomacyAmerican policyU.S. policyAmerica's foreign policy
The foreign policy of the United States is its interactions with foreign nations and how it sets standards of interaction for its organizations, corporations and system citizens of the United States.wikipedia
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United States Department of State

State DepartmentU.S. State DepartmentDepartment of State
The officially stated goals of the foreign policy of the United States, including all the Bureaus and Offices in the United States Department of State, as mentioned in the Foreign Policy Agenda of the Department of State, are "to build and sustain a more democratic, secure, and prosperous world for the benefit of the American people and the international community". According to J. Dana Stuster, writing in Foreign Policy, there are seven "confirmed cases" where the U.S.—acting principally through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), but sometimes with the support of other parts of the U.S. government, including the Navy and State Department—covertly assisted in the overthrow of a foreign government: Iran in 1953, Guatemala in 1954, Congo in 1960, the Dominican Republic in 1961, South Vietnam in 1963, Brazil in 1964, and Chile in 1973.
The United States Department of State (DOS), commonly referred to as the State Department, is a federal executive department responsible for carrying out U.S. foreign policy and international relations.

Cold War

The Cold WarCold War eraCold-War
The main trend regarding the history of U.S. foreign policy since the American Revolution is the shift from non-interventionism before and after World War I, to its growth as a world power and global hegemony during and since World War II and the end of the Cold War in the 20th century.
The historiography of the conflict began between 1946 (the year U.S. diplomat George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram" from Moscow cemented a U.S. foreign policy of containment of Soviet expansionism) and 1947 (the introduction of the Truman Doctrine).

Executive agreement

executive agreements
For information on executive agreements in US foreign policy, see Foreign policy of the United States.''

Containment

containcontainingcontainment policy
A policy of containment was adopted to limit Soviet expansion, and a series of proxy wars were fought with mixed results.
As a description of U.S. foreign policy, the word originated in a report Kennan submitted to U.S. Defense Secretary James Forrestal in 1947, which was later used in a magazine article.

Israel–United States relations

US aid to IsraelIsrael-United States relationssupport for Israel
Since then the Republicans have been characterized by a hawkish and intense American nationalism, and strong opposition to Communism, and strong support for Israel.
Qualitative Military Edge (QME) is a concept in US foreign policy.

Treaty Clause

treatiestreatycan be overturned by a future elected President
The body of law governing U.S. foreign policy recognizes three mechanisms by which the United States enters into binding international obligations.

American nationalism

nationalismAmerican nationalistAmerican patriotism
Since then the Republicans have been characterized by a hawkish and intense American nationalism, and strong opposition to Communism, and strong support for Israel.
Acknowledging the conception of the United States as accountable for spreading liberal change and promoting democracy throughout the world's politics and governance has defined practically all of American foreign policy.

Arsenal of Democracy

Arsenal of Democracy SpeechOn National Security
As a result of intense internal debate, the national policy was one of becoming the Arsenal of Democracy, that is financing and equipping the Allied armies without sending American combat soldiers.
It marked the decline of the isolationist and non-interventionist doctrine that had dominated interwar U.S. foreign policy since the United States' involvement in World War I.

United States and the International Criminal Court

Bilateral Immunity AgreementArticle 98 agreementsArticle 98 Agreement
Once ratified, treaties are generally self-executing—at least from the perspective of other nations—as the ratifying state fully binds itself to the treaty as a matter of the public international law and of national honor and good faith.

Iraq War

Operation Iraqi FreedomIraqwar in Iraq
Some analysts have argued that the implementation of the Carter Doctrine and the Reagan Corollary also played a role in the outbreak of the 2003 Iraq War.
In October 1998, removing the Iraqi government became official U.S. foreign policy with enactment of the Iraq Liberation Act.

Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American War
Despite two wars with European Powers—the War of 1812 and the Spanish–American War in 1898—American foreign policy was mostly peaceful and marked by steady expansion of its foreign trade during the 19th century.
The war marked American entry into world affairs.

2003 invasion of Iraq

invasion of IraqIraq War2003 Iraq War
It sometimes acts through NATO, as with the NATO intervention in Bosnia and Herzegovina, NATO bombing of Yugoslavia, and ISAF in Afghanistan, but often acts unilaterally or in ad-hoc coalitions as with the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
In October 1998, removing the Iraqi government became official U.S. foreign policy with enactment of the Iraq Liberation Act.

United States energy independence

energy independenceforeign oilNorth American energy independence
While its imports have exceeded domestic production since the early 1990s, new hydraulic fracturing techniques and discovery of shale oil deposits in Canada and the American Dakotas offer the potential for increased energy independence from oil exporting countries such as OPEC.
Oil imports are most problematic in domestic politics and energy security when they come from countries that are openly hostile to US foreign policy and interests (Iran, Venezuela, and formerly Iraq), are former or potential future rivals (Russia) or have questionable human rights practices (Saudi Arabia).

September 11 attacks

9/11September 11, 2001 attacksSeptember 11, 2001
The United States itself was the first country to invoke the mutual defense provisions of the alliance, in response to the September 11 attacks.
In a second fatwā in 1998, bin Laden outlined his objections to American foreign policy with respect to Israel, as well as the continued presence of American troops in Saudi Arabia after the Gulf War.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
Former U.S. President George W. Bush identified dependence on imported oil as an urgent "national security concern".
During his presidential campaign, Bush's foreign policy platform included support for stronger economic and political relationship with Latin America, especially Mexico, and a reduction of involvement in "nation-building" and other small-scale military engagements.

Woodrow Wilson

WilsonPresident WilsonPresident Woodrow Wilson
President Wilson's Fourteen Points was developed from his idealistic Wilsonianism program of spreading democracy and fighting militarism to prevent future wars.
Wilson's idealistic foreign policy, which came to be known as Wilsonianism, also cast a long shadow over American foreign policy, and Wilson's League of Nations influenced the development of the United Nations.

United States Navy

U.S. NavyUS NavyNavy
According to J. Dana Stuster, writing in Foreign Policy, there are seven "confirmed cases" where the U.S.—acting principally through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), but sometimes with the support of other parts of the U.S. government, including the Navy and State Department—covertly assisted in the overthrow of a foreign government: Iran in 1953, Guatemala in 1954, Congo in 1960, the Dominican Republic in 1961, South Vietnam in 1963, Brazil in 1964, and Chile in 1973.
The U.S. Navy established itself as a player in United States foreign policy through the actions of Commodore Matthew Perry in Japan, which resulted in the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Subject to the advice and consent role of the U.S. Senate, the President of the United States negotiates treaties with foreign nations, then treaties enter into force only if ratified by two-thirds of the Senate.
Similarly, the president may make congressional-executive agreements with the approval of a simple majority in each House of Congress, rather than a two-thirds majority in the Senate.

Central Intelligence Agency

CIAC.I.A.Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
According to J. Dana Stuster, writing in Foreign Policy, there are seven "confirmed cases" where the U.S.—acting principally through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), but sometimes with the support of other parts of the U.S. government, including the Navy and State Department—covertly assisted in the overthrow of a foreign government: Iran in 1953, Guatemala in 1954, Congo in 1960, the Dominican Republic in 1961, South Vietnam in 1963, Brazil in 1964, and Chile in 1973.
The invasion was a major embarrassment for US foreign policy.

Anti-Americanism

anti-Americananti-American sentimentanti-US
Anti-Americanism (also called anti-American sentiment and Americanophobia) is a sentiment that espouses a dislike of or opposition to the American government or its policies, especially in regards to its foreign policy, or to the United States in general.

China containment policy

China containment strategyChinese containment policycontainment
The China containment policy is a political term referring to the goal of U.S. foreign policy in the past or present to diminish the economic and political growth of the People’s Republic of China.

Foreign policy of the Bill Clinton administration

Bill Clinton administrationClinton was considering invading Haitiforeign policy
The foreign policy of the Bill Clinton administration was the foreign policy of the United States during the two term Presidency of Bill Clinton, 1993 to 2001.

Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration

foreign policyBush Administrationas policy
The foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration was the foreign policy of the United States from 2001 to 2009 while George W. Bush was president.

Foreign policy of the Barack Obama administration

foreign policyBarack Obama's policiesforeign policy initiatives
The foreign policy of the Barack Obama administration was the foreign policy of the United States from 2009 to 2017, when Barack Obama served as President of the United States.

Special Activities Center

Special Activities DivisionSADSAD/SOG
Political and "influence" covert operations are used to support U.S. foreign policy.