Forestry

loggingtimber tradeforesterforestforest engineerforest scienceforestersForest engineeringforest managementforest scientist
Forestry is the science and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests, woodlands, and associated resources for human and environmental benefits.wikipedia
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Forester

forestersChief Foresterforestry engineer
A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester.
A forester is a person who practices forestry, the science, art, and profession of managing forests.

Silviculture

silviculturalsilviculturistsilviculturalist
Silviculture is narrower than forestry, being concerned only with forest plants, but is often used synonymously with forestry.
No matter how forestry as a science is constituted, the kernel of the business of forestry has historically been silviculture, as it includes direct action in the forest, and in it all economic objectives and technical considerations ultimately converge.

Verderer

Verderersspecial courtsVerderer of Epping Forest
Other common terms are: a verderer, or a silviculturalist.
Verderers are forestry officials in England who deal with common land in certain former royal hunting areas which are the property of the Crown.

Lumber

timberdimensional lumber2x4
Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as "sinks" for atmospheric carbon dioxide. In many regions the forest industry is of major ecological, economic, and social importance, with the United States producing more timber than any other country in the world. Forestry studies also include the development of better methods for the planting, protecting, thinning, controlled burning, felling, extracting, and processing of timber.
Its introduction has been strongly opposed by the forestry industry.

Forest stand

Stand level modellingstandforest stands
Forestry is practiced in plantations and natural stands.
A forest is a "collection of stands" also utilizing the practices of forestry.

Renewable resource

renewablerenewable sourcesrenewable energy sources
For example, in Germany, forests cover nearly a third of the land area, wood is the most important renewable resource, and forestry supports more than a million jobs and about €181 billion of value to the German economy each year.
An important renewable resource is wood provided by means of forestry, which has been used for construction, housing and firewood since ancient times.

History of the forest in Central Europe

Europe in the late 18th centuryforests of EuropeGerman
Forest management also flourished in the German states in the 14th century, e.g. in Nuremberg, and in 16th-century Japan.

Forest railway

logging railroadlogging railwaybush railway
The 19th century widely increased the availability of steel for whipsaws and introduced Forest railways and railways in general for transport and as forestry customer.
A forest railway, forest tram, timber line, logging railway or logging railroad is a mode of railway transport which is used for forestry tasks, primarily the transportation of felled logs to sawmills or railway stations.

Forestry law

forestry rightsforest law
The enactment and evolution of forest laws and binding regulations occurred in most Western nations in the 20th century in response to growing conservation concerns and the increasing technological capacity of logging companies.
Forestry laws govern activities in designated forest lands, most commonly with respect to forest management and timber harvesting.

Dietrich Brandis

BrandisSir Dietrich BrandisTropical forestry
Many foresters were either from continental Europe (like Sir Dietrich Brandis), or educated there (like Gifford Pinchot).
Sir Dietrich Brandis (31 March 1824 – 28 May 1907, Bonn) was a German-British botanist and forestry academic and administrator, who worked with the British Imperial Forestry Service in colonial India for nearly 30 years.

Logging

lumberingloggedlumberman
The enactment and evolution of forest laws and binding regulations occurred in most Western nations in the 20th century in response to growing conservation concerns and the increasing technological capacity of logging companies.
In forestry, the term logging is sometimes used narrowly to describe the logistics of moving wood from the stump to somewhere outside the forest, usually a sawmill or a lumber yard.

Forest ecology

forest ecosystemforest ecosystemsforest habitat
Today a strong body of research exists regarding the management of forest ecosystems and the genetic improvement of tree species and varieties.
The management of forests is known as forestry, silviculture, and forest management.

Sylwan

Sylwan is the oldest scientific journal covering forestry in the world that is still in print.

Journal of Forestry

Forestry Quarterly
It aims to advance the forestry profession by keeping professional foresters informed about developments and ideas related to the practice of forestry.

Wood industry

timber industrylumber industryforest industry
In many regions the forest industry is of major ecological, economic, and social importance, with the United States producing more timber than any other country in the world. Foresters work for the timber industry, government agencies, conservation groups, local authorities, urban parks boards, citizens' associations, and private landowners.
The wood industry or lumber industry is a—usually private—economic sector concerned with forestry, logging, timber trade, and the production of forest products, timber/lumber, primary forest and wood products (e.g. furniture) and secondary products like wood pulp for the pulp and paper industry.

Thinning

thinnedBerry thinningMethods of thinning
Forestry studies also include the development of better methods for the planting, protecting, thinning, controlled burning, felling, extracting, and processing of timber.
In forestry, thinning is the selective removal of trees, primarily undertaken to improve the growth rate or health of the remaining trees.

Biodiversity

diversitybiological diversitybiodiverse
Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as "sinks" for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Šumarski list

Šumarski list is one of the oldest, still-publishing forestry journals in the world.

Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Forstwesen

Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Forstwesen (the Swiss Forestry Journal) is one of the oldest forestry journals still in print in the world.

Geographic information system

GISgeographic information systemsgeographical information system
Professional foresters measure and model the growth of forests with tools like geographic information systems.
Developed by Dr. Roger Tomlinson, it was called the Canada Geographic Information System (CGIS) and was used to store, analyze, and manipulate data collected for the Canada Land Inventory – an effort to determine the land capability for rural Canada by mapping information about soils, agriculture, recreation, wildlife, waterfowl, forestry and land use at a scale of 1:50,000.

Conservation movement

conservationistconservationconservationists
Foresters work for the timber industry, government agencies, conservation groups, local authorities, urban parks boards, citizens' associations, and private landowners.
Published as a book two years later, it was one of the most highly influential texts on forestry ever published.

Plant nursery

nurseryplant nurseriesnurseries
Foresters work in tree nurseries growing seedlings for woodland creation or regeneration projects.
Nurseries may supply plants for gardens, agriculture, forestry and conservation biology.

Ecology

ecologicalecologistecologically
With the rise of ecology and environmental science, there has been a reordering in the applied sciences.
Ecology has practical applications in conservation biology, wetland management, natural resource management (agroecology, agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, fisheries), city planning (urban ecology), community health, economics, basic and applied science, and human social interaction (human ecology).

Agriculture

farmingagriculturalAgriculturist
Agriculture and forest leaders are also trying to understand how the climate change legislation will affect what they do.
Thus defined, it includes arable farming, horticulture, animal husbandry and forestry, but horticulture and forestry are in practice often excluded.

Deforestation

deforestedland clearingforest clearing
Large deforestations came with respectively after the decline of the Romans.