A report on Former Qin and Heavenly King

Former Qin 376 CE
A historical marker at the Nanjing Presidential Palace mentioning the term "Heavenly King" in its title
Former Qin 376 CE
Hong Xiuquan, 1st Heavenly King of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom

All rulers of Former Qin proclaimed themselves "Emperor", except for Fu Jian (苻堅) (357–385) who instead claimed the title "Heavenly King" (Tian Wang).

- Former Qin

Former Qin: Fu Jian, the third emperor of the Former Qin, proclaimed himself as Heavenly Emperor during his reign, as well as his wife becoming "Heavenly Mistress".

- Heavenly King
Former Qin 376 CE

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Fu Jian (337–385)

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Fu Jian (337–385), courtesy name Yonggu (永固) or Wenyu (文玉), formally Emperor Xuanzhao of (Former) Qin ((前)秦宣昭帝), was an emperor (who, however, used the title "Heavenly King" (Tian Wang) during his reign) of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty, under whose rule (assisted by his able prime minister Wang Meng) the Former Qin state reached its greatest glory—destroying Former Yan, Former Liang, and Dai and seizing Jin's Yi Province (modern Sichuan and Chongqing), posturing to destroy Jin as well to unite China, until he was repelled at the Battle of Fei River in 383.

Later Qin in 402 AD

Later Qin

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State ruled by the Qiang ethnicity of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (266–420) in China.

State ruled by the Qiang ethnicity of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (266–420) in China.

Later Qin in 402 AD

The Later Qin is entirely distinct from the Qin dynasty, the Former Qin and the Western Qin.

All rulers of the Later Qin declared themselves emperors, but for a substantial part of Yao Xing's reign, he used the title Tian Wang.