A report on Former Qin and Later Qin

Former Qin 376 CE
Later Qin in 402 AD
Former Qin 376 CE

The Later Qin is entirely distinct from the Qin dynasty, the Former Qin and the Western Qin.

- Later Qin

Despite its name, the Former Qin was much later and less powerful than the Qin dynasty which had ruled all of China proper during the 3rd century BC. The adjectival prefix "former" is used to distinguish it from the "Later Qin dynasty" (384-417).

- Former Qin
Former Qin 376 CE

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.

Sixteen Kingdoms

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Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.
Ruins of Tongwancheng, the capital of the Xia kingdom built in the early 5th century by Xiongnu chieftain Helian Bobo in modern-day Jingbian, in northern Shaanxi province, near the border with Inner Mongolia. Tongwancheng was captured by the Xianbei-led Northern Wei in 427.
A mural painting showing a leisurely life scene 384-441 A.D., from the Dingjiazha Tomb No. 5 in Chiu-ch'üan, Later Liang – Northern Liang.
The White Horse Pagoda, Dunhuang, commemorating Kumarajiva's white horse which carried the scriptures to China, c. 384.
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The term "Sixteen Kingdoms" was first used by the 6th-century historian Cui Hong in the Spring and Autumn Annals of the Sixteen Kingdoms and refers to the five Liangs (Former, Later, Northern, Southern and Western), four Yans (Former, Later, Northern, and Southern), three Qins (Former, Later and Western), two Zhaos (Former and Later), Cheng Han and Xia.

A historical marker at the Nanjing Presidential Palace mentioning the term "Heavenly King" in its title

Heavenly King

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Chinese title for various religious deities and divine leaders throughout history, as well as an alternate form of the term Son of Heaven, referring to the emperor.

Chinese title for various religious deities and divine leaders throughout history, as well as an alternate form of the term Son of Heaven, referring to the emperor.

A historical marker at the Nanjing Presidential Palace mentioning the term "Heavenly King" in its title
Hong Xiuquan, 1st Heavenly King of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom

Former Qin: Fu Jian, the third emperor of the Former Qin, proclaimed himself as Heavenly Emperor during his reign, as well as his wife becoming "Heavenly Mistress".

Later Qin: In 416, Yao Xing proclaimed himself as a Heavenly King when he assumed power. His father, Yao Chang, did not use the term however.