Former Qin

Former Qin 376 CE
Former Qin 376 CE

Dynastic state of the Sixteen Kingdoms in Chinese history ruled by the Di ethnicity.

- Former Qin
Former Qin 376 CE

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A historical marker at the Nanjing Presidential Palace mentioning the term "Heavenly King" in its title

Heavenly King

Chinese title for various religious deities and divine leaders throughout history, as well as an alternate form of the term Son of Heaven, referring to the emperor.

Chinese title for various religious deities and divine leaders throughout history, as well as an alternate form of the term Son of Heaven, referring to the emperor.

A historical marker at the Nanjing Presidential Palace mentioning the term "Heavenly King" in its title
Hong Xiuquan, 1st Heavenly King of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom

Former Qin: Fu Jian, the third emperor of the Former Qin, proclaimed himself as Heavenly Emperor during his reign, as well as his wife becoming "Heavenly Mistress".

The situation during Battle of Fei River

Battle of Fei River

The situation during Battle of Fei River
Former Qin is in purple, while the Eastern Jin is in yellow. The red line marks the new border between Former Qin and Eastern Jin after the latter's victory at Fei River, while the border marked on the map represents the pre-battle border, the furthest line reached by Former Qin forces before their catastrophic defeat.
Jin iron swords

The Battle of Fei River, also known as the Battle of Feishui, was a battle in AD 383 in China, where forces of the Di-led Former Qin dynasty was decisively defeated by the outnumbered army of the Eastern Jin dynasty.

Later Qin in 402 AD

Later Qin

State ruled by the Qiang ethnicity of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (266–420) in China.

State ruled by the Qiang ethnicity of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (266–420) in China.

Later Qin in 402 AD

The Later Qin is entirely distinct from the Qin dynasty, the Former Qin and the Western Qin.

East Asian Dragons are legendary creatures in East-Asian mythology and culture.

Fu Jian (317–355)

East Asian Dragons are legendary creatures in East-Asian mythology and culture.

Fu Jian (317–355), originally named Pu Jian (蒲健, name changed 350), courtesy name Jianye (建業), formally Emperor Jingming of (Former) Qin ((前)秦景明帝), was the founding emperor of the Di-led Chinese Former Qin dynasty.

Lineage of the Dingling

Dingling

The Dingling ( (174 BCE); (200 BCE); Eastern Han Chinese: *teŋ-leŋ < Old Chinese: *têŋ-rêŋ) were ancient people who lived in Siberia, mentioned in Chinese historiography in the context of the 1st century BCE.

The Dingling ( (174 BCE); (200 BCE); Eastern Han Chinese: *teŋ-leŋ < Old Chinese: *têŋ-rêŋ) were ancient people who lived in Siberia, mentioned in Chinese historiography in the context of the 1st century BCE.

Lineage of the Dingling

During the Sixteen Kingdoms period, the West Dingling Khan Zhai Bin (翟斌) lead his hordes, migrate from Kazakhstan into Central China, served under the Former Qin, after series of plotting, Zhai Bin was betrayed by Former Qin, to avoid Qin nobles further attempts, he revolted against the Former Qin Dynasty.

The Buddhist stupa of Gaochang ruins

Gaochang

Site of a ruined, ancient oasis city on the northern rim of the inhospitable Taklamakan Desert in present-day Xinjiang, China.

Site of a ruined, ancient oasis city on the northern rim of the inhospitable Taklamakan Desert in present-day Xinjiang, China.

The Buddhist stupa of Gaochang ruins
Gaochang's location (close to Turpan) on the Silk Road
Manichaean priests, writing at their desks. Manuscript from Qocho. 8th/9th century
Wall painting from a Christian church, Qocho 683–770 CE
Uyghur princesses, cave 9, wall painting from Bezeklik caves
Man of Gaochang (高昌國, Turfan) in 番客入朝圖 (937-976 CE)
Armoured soldier from Gaochang, 8-9th century
The road leading in.
The ruins.
"Main prayer hall<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=18,4145,0,0,1,0|title = Buddhist Channel &#124; Travel}}</ref>".
"Main storage building".
Manichaean wall painting.

Gaochang was ruled by the Former Liang, Former Qin and Northern Liang as part of a commandery.