Fort Carlton

CarletonCarleton HouseCarlton HouseCarlton House (Saskatchewan)Fort CarletonFort Carlton Provincial Historic ParkFort Carlton Provincial ParkFort Carlton, Saskatchewan
Fort Carlton was a Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post from 1795 until 1885.wikipedia
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Lawrence Clarke (politician)

Lawrence Clarke
Lawrence Clarke served as its last Chief Factor.
He resided at Fort Carlton in Canada.

Fort de la Corne

Fort à la CorneFort a la CorneFort des Prairies
In 1796 the Hudson's Bay Company built the first Carleton House a mile and a half downstream.

Treaty 6

6Treaty SixConfederacy of Treaty Six First Nations
Treaty Six between the Canadian monarch and various Cree and Saulteaux First Nations was initially negotiated and signed near the Fort in 1876.
Specifically, Treaty 6 is an agreement between the Crown and the Plains and Woods Cree, Assiniboine, and other band governments at Fort Carlton and Fort Pitt.

Carlton Trail

Fort Edmonton-Fort Gary TrailVictoria Trail
Situated on the Carlton Trail from the Red River Colony in present-day Manitoba to Fort Edmonton in what is now Alberta, Fort Carlton served as a hub for travellers.
From there the trail ran north and crossed the South Saskatchewan River near Batoche, Saskatchewan and reached Fort Carlton on the North Saskatchewan River.

District of Saskatchewan

SaskatchewanSaskatchewan DistrictProvisional District of Saskatchewan
It was a major base of operations for the Company's Saskatchewan District.
The District of Saskatchewan in 1888 included the five French speaking settlements of St. Laurent, Fish Creek, Duck Lake, Batoche and St. Louis de Langevin in the area of the South Branch of the Saskatchewan River and the settlements of Green Lake, La Ronge, Red Deer Lake (56-25-W2), Nut Lake (39-23-W2), Birch River, Fort à la Corne, Snake Plains (northwest of Carleton near Muskeg Lake), Birch Hills (46-23-W3), Clarke's Crossing (38-4-W3), Shell River (15 miles northwest of Prince Albert), Carrot River, Cumberland House, The Pas, Grand Rapids, Battleford, Fort Pitt, Frog Lake, Onion Lake, Cold Lake, Fort Carlton, Humboldt, Saskatoon.

Fort Edmonton

Edmonton Housecompany's trading outpost named after EdmontonFort Augustus
Situated on the Carlton Trail from the Red River Colony in present-day Manitoba to Fort Edmonton in what is now Alberta, Fort Carlton served as a hub for travellers.
After the amalgamation of the companies (which thereafter used the Hudson's Bay Company name), Fort Edmonton became the headquarters for the Saskatchewan District of Rupert's Land, which stretched from the Canadian Rocky Mountains in the west to Fort Carlton in the east; from the 49th parallel in the south to Lesser Slave Lake in the north.

South Branch House

The site is about 20 miles east of Fort Carlton on the North Saskatchewan River, about 10 miles west of Saint Louis, Saskatchewan and about 10 miles north of Batoche, Saskatchewan.

Duck Lake, Saskatchewan

Duck LakeBeardy's & Okemasis First NationsBeardy's 97
It was located along the North Saskatchewan River not far from Duck Lake, Saskatchewan.
At Duck Lake, the Prince Albert Trail, which ran from Regina to Prince Albert, crossed the Carlton Trail and it marked the halfway point between the Métis headquarters at Batoche and the North-West Mounted Police at Fort Carlton.

Prince Albert Volunteers

52nd Regiment (Prince Albert Volunteers)Prince Albert and Battleford Volunteers
Following the Battle of Duck Lake it was abandoned by the police and Prince Albert Volunteers then briefly occupied by Gabriel Dumont's Métis forces, who later chose to withdraw to Batoche.
"Gentleman" Joe McKay, an Anglo-Métis scout of the North-West Mounted Police was sent to Prince Albert from Fort Carlton to enlist about 20 men as volunteers on 20 March 1885.

Battle of Duck Lake

Duck Lakeresulting fight
Following the Battle of Duck Lake it was abandoned by the police and Prince Albert Volunteers then briefly occupied by Gabriel Dumont's Métis forces, who later chose to withdraw to Batoche.
Leif Crozier, the newly appointed NWMP superintendent and commander of North-Western Saskatchewan's forces, requested immediate reinforcement to Fort Carlton because he feared the growing instability created by Riel and the ever-growing possibility of a First Nations uprising.

Wingard, Saskatchewan

Wingard
Wingard is seven miles northeast of Fort Carlton and twelve miles northwest of Duck Lake.

Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Prince AlbertPrince Albert, SKIsbister's Settlement
The Prince Albert blockhouse was employed by the Royal Northwest Mounted Police on evacuating from Fort Carlton after the first fire.
In 1866, Prince Albert was established as a mission post, and a trail to Fort Carlton arose.

Hudson's Bay Company

Hudson’s Bay CompanyHBCHudson Bay Company
Fort Carlton was a Hudson's Bay Company fur trade post from 1795 until 1885.

Saskatchewan

SKSaskatchewan, CanadaProvince of Saskatchewan
It was rebuilt by the Saskatchewan government as a provincial historic park and can be visited today.

Factor (agent)

factorChief Factorfactors
Lawrence Clarke served as its last Chief Factor.

Red River Colony

Red River SettlementRed RiverSelkirk Settlement
Situated on the Carlton Trail from the Red River Colony in present-day Manitoba to Fort Edmonton in what is now Alberta, Fort Carlton served as a hub for travellers.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
Situated on the Carlton Trail from the Red River Colony in present-day Manitoba to Fort Edmonton in what is now Alberta, Fort Carlton served as a hub for travellers.

North Saskatchewan River

North SaskatchewanNorthNorth Saskatchewan River valley
It was located along the North Saskatchewan River not far from Duck Lake, Saskatchewan.

Monarchy of Canada

Queen of CanadaCanadian monarchCanadian Royal Family
Treaty Six between the Canadian monarch and various Cree and Saulteaux First Nations was initially negotiated and signed near the Fort in 1876.

Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
Treaty Six between the Canadian monarch and various Cree and Saulteaux First Nations was initially negotiated and signed near the Fort in 1876.

Saulteaux

Plains OjibweSalteauxBungi
Treaty Six between the Canadian monarch and various Cree and Saulteaux First Nations was initially negotiated and signed near the Fort in 1876.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
Treaty Six between the Canadian monarch and various Cree and Saulteaux First Nations was initially negotiated and signed near the Fort in 1876.