Fort Edmonton

Edmonton Housecompany's trading outpost named after EdmontonFort AugustusFort Edmonton #3Fort Edmonton trading postFort Edmonton, Mark V (1830–1915)Fort-des-Prairies
Fort Edmonton (also named Edmonton House) was the name of a series of trading posts of the Hudson's Bay Company from 1795 to 1891, all of which were located in central Alberta, Canada.wikipedia
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Edmonton

Edmonton, AlbertaEdmonton, CanadaEdmonton, AB
The fifth and final Fort Edmonton was the one that evolved into present-day Edmonton.
By 1795, Fort Edmonton was established on the river's north bank as a major trading post for the Hudson's Bay Company.

Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
From 1795 to 1821 it was paired with the North West Company's Fort Augustus. It was the end point of the Carlton Trail, the main overland route for Metis freighters between the Red River Colony and the west and an important stop on the York Factory Express route between London, via Hudson Bay, and Fort Vancouver in the Columbia District.
In the Fort Edmonton region however, many House Indians never adopted a Métis identity but continued to identify primarily as Cree, Saulteaux, Ojibwa, and Chipweyan descendants up until the early 20th century.

Alberta Legislature Building

Alberta Legislative BuildingLegislature BuildingAlberta Legislature
In the summer of 1795, the North West Company constructed Fort Augustus where the Sturgeon River meets the North Saskatchewan River, just north of the present-day city of Fort Saskatchewan, approximately 35 km northeast of the final Fort Edmonton, in the center of modern Edmonton.
The building is located on a promontory overlooking the scenic North Saskatchewan River valley near the location of Fort Edmonton, Mark V (1830–1915), a Hudson's Bay Company fur-trading post, a long-established economic and administrative centre of the western Prairies.

North Saskatchewan River

North SaskatchewanNorthNorth Saskatchewan River valley
In the summer of 1795, the North West Company constructed Fort Augustus where the Sturgeon River meets the North Saskatchewan River, just north of the present-day city of Fort Saskatchewan, approximately 35 km northeast of the final Fort Edmonton, in the center of modern Edmonton.
Many fur trade posts were constructed on the river, including Fort Edmonton (1795) and Rocky Mountain House, the uppermost post reached by canoe navigation.

Edmonton, London

EdmontonEdmonton, MiddlesexLower Edmonton
The Fort was named after Edmonton, Middlesex, England, birthplace of both Pruden and HBC Deputy Governor Sir James Winter Lake.
The company's trading outpost named after Edmonton is now the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta.

John Rowand

John Rowand, the Chief Factor at Fort Edmonton from 1823 to 1854, first worked at Fort Augustus from 1804 to 1806; he was stationed there again from 1808 onward.
At the peak of his career, he was Chief Factor at Fort Edmonton, and in charge of the HBC's vast Saskatchewan District.

Rossdale, Edmonton

RossdaleGrierson HillRossdale Flats
In 1802, due to several years of declining fur returns and increasingly scarce firewood, it was decided to move Fort Edmonton and Fort Augustus upstream, to what is now the Rossdale area of downtown Edmonton.
In the early 1800s it was used as the site for the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Edmonton and the North West Company's Fort Augustus, although this was only a theory until 2012 when a trench thought to be part of stockade wall was unearthed.

John Peter Pruden

Edmonton House, and the subsequent forts, was named by John Peter Pruden, clerk to the HBC's George Sutherland.
In May 1796 Pruden moved to a post called Fort Edmonton or Edmonton House.

Fort Carlton

CarletonCarleton HouseCarlton House
After the amalgamation of the companies (which thereafter used the Hudson's Bay Company name), Fort Edmonton became the headquarters for the Saskatchewan District of Rupert's Land, which stretched from the Canadian Rocky Mountains in the west to Fort Carlton in the east; from the 49th parallel in the south to Lesser Slave Lake in the north.
Situated on the Carlton Trail from the Red River Colony in present-day Manitoba to Fort Edmonton in what is now Alberta, Fort Carlton served as a hub for travellers.

York Factory Express

ExpressExpress TrailHBC "Express
From 1795 to 1821 it was paired with the North West Company's Fort Augustus. It was the end point of the Carlton Trail, the main overland route for Metis freighters between the Red River Colony and the west and an important stop on the York Factory Express route between London, via Hudson Bay, and Fort Vancouver in the Columbia District.
Up the Columbia River past the posts of Fort Nez Perces, Fort Okanogan, and Fort Colvile to Boat Encampment (today under Kinbasket Lake), then over Athabasca Pass to Jasper House, down the Athabasca River to Fort Assiniboine, then overland 80 miles (129 km) along the Athabasca Landing Trail to Fort Edmonton; thence down the North Saskatchewan River and Saskatchewan River to Lake Winnipeg and via Norway House on the Nelson River.

Marie-Anne Gaboury

Marie Anne LagimodièreMarie-Anne LagimodièreMarie-Anne Lagimodière (née Gaboury)
The first woman of European descent to live in this region was the French-Canadian Marie-Anne Lagimodière (née Gaboury), who was also noteworthy as the grandmother of Louis Riel.
Although they managed to escape on horseback, they were pursued for five days until reaching the safety of Fort des Prairie (also known as Fort Augustus, a counterpart to Fort Edmonton) near modern Edmonton, Alberta.

George Simpson (HBC administrator)

George SimpsonSir George SimpsonGeorge Simpson (administrator)
On a couple of occasions when Rowand joined HBC Inland Governor George Simpson for travel abroad, Harriott acted as chief factor.
He then went south to Fort Dunvegan on the Peace River and then Fort Edmonton and after the thaw, back to York Factory.

Robert Terrill Rundle

Robert RundleReverend Robert Rundle
Starting in 1840, the Fort housed the Wesleyan missionary Robert Rundle as a company chaplain.
He arrived at Fort Edmonton, the center of the Hudson's Bay Company Saskatchewan District, in October 1840.

Albert Lacombe

Father Albert LacombeFather LacombeFr. Albert Lacombe
In 1852, the Oblate missionary Albert Lacombe first visited Fort Edmonton.
Later in 1852, Father Lacombe proceeded to Fort Edmonton and Lac Ste. Anne, where he overwintered with the Cree and Métis.

Fort Pitt Provincial Park

Fort PittFort Pitt (Saskatchewan)Fort Pitt, Saskatchewan
Accounts suggest that he tried to break up (or join) a skirmish between some of the tripmen while at Fort Pitt, and in his rage he fell suddenly dead.
It was built at the direction of Chief Factor John Rowand, previously of Fort Edmonton, in order to trade for bison hides, meat and pemmican.

William J. Christie

William Joseph Christie
Following a few short-lived administrations in Rowand's wake, William J. Christie was a long-lasting chief factor at Edmonton from 1858 to 1872.
He quotes William Joseph Christie then the chief factor of Fort Edmonton as saying in perfect French "I am myself a Metis. By George! We are almost all Métis in the Company. Among the chief factors there is not a single Englishman, and maybe not ten Scots with pure blood."(translation)

Paul Kane

Kane, Paul
The artist Paul Kane first visited the fort in 1845.
For variety, he continued from there on horseback to Fort Edmonton, witnessing a Cree buffalo pound hunt along the way.

Pierre-Jean De Smet

Father De SmetPierre-Jean DeSmetFather DeSmet
Father Pierre-Jean De Smet spent the winter of 1845-46 at Fort Edmonton having traveled and explored from Oregon Country to meet the natives of the Rocky Mountains.
Fortunate to find his way back to Rocky Mountain House, he was guided by Indians from there to Fort Edmonton, where he spent the winter of 1845-1846.

James Sinclair (fur trader)

James SinclairSinclair Sinclair
In 1841 James Sinclair stopped at Fort Edmonton to receive instructions on where to cross the Rockies.
They followed the Red River north, crossing Lake Winnipeg and traveled in the Saskatchewan River system to Fort Edmonton.

Jean-Baptiste Thibault

Abbé Thibault
Rundle's tenure lasted until 1848, and his ministry and missionary work was met with competition of a sort by Jean-Baptiste Thibault, a Catholic priest who, like Rundle, was attempting to evangelize natives in the area.
Thibault made his first missionary journey in 1842, riding horseback across the plains as far as the Hudson's Bay Company's Edmonton House.

Mervin Vavasour

A pair of British Army lieutenants, Mervin Vavasour and Henry James Warre, were sent on a mission in the guise of eccentric gentlemen to reconnoitre the lower Columbia River valley and Puget Sound.
From this comes some of the earliest European artistic renderings of the Rocky Mountains and also valuable records such as an 1846 plan diagram of Fort Edmonton to scale.

James Carnegie, 9th Earl of Southesk

9th Earl of SoutheskJamesJames Carnegie
In 1859, the 9th Earl of Southesk visited on his way to the Rocky Mountains, hoping that the fresh mountain air would improve his health.
He arrived at Fort Edmonton on August 1.

Blackfoot Confederacy

BlackfootBlackfeetBlackfoot Indians
This location was only active for two years for two main reasons: the Cree had been encouraged to visit other posts to avoid violent confrontations with the Blackfoot, yet the generally more southerly Blackfoot refused to travel so far off of their normal circles and consequently took their trade south to Americans.
Other Niitsitapiksi nations traded more in pemmican and buffalo skins than beaver, and visited other posts such as Fort Edmonton.

Palliser expedition

British North American Exploring Expeditionduring his expeditionsexpedition
Captain John Palliser stayed in Fort Edmonton for a time in 1858 while on his famous expedition.
Palliser and Sullivan mapped the North Kananaskis Pass and North Kootenay Pass before returning to Fort Edmonton for the winter.

Carlton Trail

Fort Edmonton-Fort Gary TrailVictoria Trail
From 1795 to 1821 it was paired with the North West Company's Fort Augustus. It was the end point of the Carlton Trail, the main overland route for Metis freighters between the Red River Colony and the west and an important stop on the York Factory Express route between London, via Hudson Bay, and Fort Vancouver in the Columbia District.
From there, it ran west along the northside of the river to Fort Edmonton at what is now Edmonton, Alberta.