Fort Frontenac

CataraquiCataracouiFort CataracouiFort CataraquiTête-de-Pont Barracks
Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in July 1673 at the mouth of the Cataraqui River where the St. Lawrence River leaves Lake Ontario (at what is now the western end of the La Salle Causeway), in a location traditionally known as Cataraqui.wikipedia
131 Related Articles

Kingston, Ontario

KingstonKingston, ONKingston, Upper Canada
It is the present-day location of Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
This outpost, called Fort Cataraqui, and later Fort Frontenac, became a focus for settlement.

Louis de Buade de Frontenac

FrontenacComte de FrontenacGovernor Frontenac
The original fort, a crude, wooden palisade structure, was called Fort Cataraqui but was later named for Louis de Buade de Frontenac, Governor of New France who was responsible for building the fort.
In his first term, he supported the expansion of the fur trade, establishing Fort Frontenac (in what is now Kingston, Ontario) and came into conflict with the other members of the Sovereign Council over its expansion and over the corvées required to build the new forts.

Lake Ontario

OntariolakeLakes Ontario
Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in July 1673 at the mouth of the Cataraqui River where the St. Lawrence River leaves Lake Ontario (at what is now the western end of the La Salle Causeway), in a location traditionally known as Cataraqui.
A series of trading posts were established by both the British and French, such as Fort Frontenac (Kingston) in 1673, Fort Oswego in 1722, Fort Rouillé (Toronto) in 1750.

René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle

La SalleRobert de La SalleRené Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle
Explorer René Robert Cavalier de La Salle was ordered by governor Daniel de Rémy de Courcelle to select a location for a fort.
Originally the fort was named Fort Cataraqui but was later renamed Fort Frontenac by La Salle in honor of his patron.

North American fur trade

fur tradefur tradersfur trading
The intent of Fort Frontenac was to control the lucrative fur trade in the Great Lakes Basin to the west and the Canadian Shield to the north.
To bolster these territorial claims, the French constructed a series of small fortifications, beginning with Fort Frontenac on Lake Ontario in 1673.

Iroquois

Iroquois ConfederacyHaudenosauneeSix Nations
By constructing the trading post the French could encourage trade with the Iroquois, who were traditionally a threat to the French because of their alliance with the English.
In 1687, the Marquis de Denonville set out for Fort Frontenac (modern Kingston, Ontario) with a well-organized force.

La Salle Causeway

LaSalle CausewayOntario Street
Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in July 1673 at the mouth of the Cataraqui River where the St. Lawrence River leaves Lake Ontario (at what is now the western end of the La Salle Causeway), in a location traditionally known as Cataraqui.
The La Salle Causeway was named after René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle who oversaw the construction of Fort Frontenac in 1673 at, what is now, the western end of the causeway.

Fort Niagara

NiagaraOld Fort NiagaraOld Fort Niagara State Historic Site
Other forts such as Fort Niagara, Fort Detroit, and Fort Michilimackinac became more important.
Joncaire and eight men dispatched from Fort Frontenac built on the right bank of the river a trading post, called Magasin Royal or Maison de la Paix (Royal Store or House of Peace).

Jacques-René de Brisay de Denonville, Marquis de Denonville

Marquis de DenonvilleDenonvilleGovernor Denonville
In 1687 La Barre's successor, the Marquis de Denonville, gathered an army to travel into the Seneca territory.
Denonville then set out with a well-organized force to Fort Frontenac, where they met with the 50 hereditary sachems of the Iroquois Confederacy from their Onondaga council fire.

Battle of Fort Oswego

Battle of Fort Oswego (1756)capture of Fort OswegoFall of Fort Oswego
General Montcalm had already used Fort Frontenac as a staging point to attack the fortifications at Oswego in August 1756.
The fall of Fort Oswego effectively interrupted the British presence on Lake Ontario and removed it as a threat to the nearby French-controlled Fort Frontenac.

Seigneurial system of New France

seigneurseigneuryseigneurial system
La Salle was granted seigneurial privileges in the vicinity of the fort.
Only two outlying feudal manors were ever established in the area that became Upper Canada, being located at L'Original on the Ottawa River and Cataraqui at the eastern end of Lake Ontario at what is now Kingston and Wolfe Island.

Galley slave

galley slavesgalleysgalley
Some were held hostage and sent to Montreal in the event that any French were captured, and some were sent to France to be used as galley slaves.
In 1687 the governor of New France, Jacques-René de Brisay de Denonville, seized, chained, and shipped 50 Iroquois chiefs from Fort Frontenac to Marseille, France, to be used as galley slaves.

Louis-Joseph de Montcalm

Marquis de MontcalmMontcalmGeneral Montcalm
General Montcalm had already used Fort Frontenac as a staging point to attack the fortifications at Oswego in August 1756. However, when the Marquis de Montcalm arrived at the fort in 1756 to launch an attack on the British at Oswego, he was not impressed with its construction.
Concerned by the number of British troops amassing near the border, Montcalm left to visit Fort Carillon to inspect the defenses while the governor general, Pierre de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil-Cavagnial, began to prepare troops at Fort Frontenac for a potential assault on Oswego, a British fort across Lake Ontario.

Antoine Lefèbvre de La Barre

Joseph-Antoine de La BarreJoseph-Antoine Le Febvre de La BarreAntoine Lefèbvre
The French began a campaign against the Iroquois to resolve the Iroquois threat, beginning with Governor Antoine Lefèbvre de La Barre's unsuccessful expedition to Fort Frontenac and into Seneca territory south of Lake Ontario in 1684.
La Salle's Fort Frontenac (today Kingston, Ontario) was attracting furs away from the Montreal traders.

Canadian Army Command and Staff College

Canadian Land Force Command and Staff CollegeCanadian Land Forces Command and Staff CollegeCommand and Staff College
The college is now known as the Canadian Army Command and Staff College.
It is located at Fort Frontenac, in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Fort Frontenac Library

The Fort Frontenac Library, located within the Canadian Land Forces Command and Staff College, Fort Frontenac, Kingston, Ontario, is the main research library for the Canadian Army.

Battle of Fort Frontenac

Fort Frontenaccapture of Fort Frontenaccaptured and destroyed Fort Frontenac
The location of the battle was Fort Frontenac, a French fort and trading post which is located at the site of present-day Kingston, Ontario, at the eastern end of Lake Ontario where it drains into the St. Lawrence River.

John Ross (1744–1809)

John RossMajor John RossCaptain John Ross
General Sir Frederick Haldimand, Governor of the Province of Quebec, ordered Major John Ross, commander at Oswego, to repair and rebuild the fort to accommodate a military garrison.
He rebuilt and repaired the old French fort (Fort Frontenac) to enable the establishment of a garrison, built grist and saw mills, established a navy yard, and assisted with the allotment of land and supplies.

Fort de La Présentation

Fort Oswegatchiefort
Supplies could also be moved west from other French posts (e.g. Fort de La Présentation).
The fall of Fort Frontenac in August 1758 increased the threat to the fort and Lorimier was recalled, replaced by Captain Antoine-Gabriel-François Benoist.

Ganneious

In 1673, the French built Fort Frontenac, which is located in modern day Kingston, Ontario and approximately 40 kilometres from Ganneious.

John Bradstreet

BradstreetColonel BradstreetColonel John Bradstreet
In August 1758, the British under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel John Bradstreet left Fort Oswego with a force of a little over 3000 men and attacked Fort Frontenac.

Beaver Wars

French and Iroquois WarsIroquois WarsIroquoian Wars
In June 1687, Governor Denonville and Pierre de Troyes set out with a well organized force to Fort Frontenac, where they met with the 50 sachems of the Iroquois Confederacy from their Onondaga council.

Iroquois settlement of the north shore of Lake Ontario

Iroquois du Nord" villagesIroquois established two villagesnewly arrived Haudenosaunee
In 1673 when the French established their first settlement along Lake Ontario, Fort Frontenac, in present-day Kingston, Ontario, many Iroquois from the nearby village of Ganneious resettled closer to the Fort.

Trading post

trading poststrade postfactory
Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in July 1673 at the mouth of the Cataraqui River where the St. Lawrence River leaves Lake Ontario (at what is now the western end of the La Salle Causeway), in a location traditionally known as Cataraqui.

Cataraqui River

Cataraqui(Greater) Cataraqui River
Fort Frontenac was a French trading post and military fort built in July 1673 at the mouth of the Cataraqui River where the St. Lawrence River leaves Lake Ontario (at what is now the western end of the La Salle Causeway), in a location traditionally known as Cataraqui.