Fort Horsted

Horsted
Fort Horsted is a scheduled monument (Monument Number 416040) that lies in the Horsted Valley to the South of Chatham, Kent, England.wikipedia
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Chatham Dockyard

ChathamChatham Royal DockyardHM Dockyard, Chatham
It is a late 19th-century Land Fort, and one of six constructed around Chatham and Gillingham, Kent to protect HM Dockyard Chatham from attack.

Fort Bridgewood

Bridgewood
It was not until the mid-1870s that a revised program was accepted, which included the construction of a convict prison at Borstal, Rochester, to provide low cost labour for the construction of a line of four forts, Fort Borstal, Fort Bridgewood, Fort Horsted and Fort Luton (a further three forts were constructed with the use of convict labour).
Four of the forts (Luton, Horsted, Bridgewoods and Borstal) were linked by a railway, hauled by convicts, to move building materials between the sites.

Scheduled monument

Scheduled Ancient Monumentscheduledscheduled monuments
Fort Horsted is a scheduled monument (Monument Number 416040) that lies in the Horsted Valley to the South of Chatham, Kent, England.

Chatham, Kent

ChathamChatham, EnglandChatham, Medway
Fort Horsted is a scheduled monument (Monument Number 416040) that lies in the Horsted Valley to the South of Chatham, Kent, England.

Gillingham, Kent

GillinghamGillingham, MedwayGillingham Pier
It is a late 19th-century Land Fort, and one of six constructed around Chatham and Gillingham, Kent to protect HM Dockyard Chatham from attack.

Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom

Royal Commission1859 Royal Commission1860 Royal Commission
Originally proposed in the Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom Report, published in 1860, it and the other land defences were omitted as part of general cost cutting with only the coastal defences on the River Medway being retained and completed under the original 1860 proposals.

River Medway

MedwayMedway ValleyMedway Estuary
Originally proposed in the Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom Report, published in 1860, it and the other land defences were omitted as part of general cost cutting with only the coastal defences on the River Medway being retained and completed under the original 1860 proposals.

Borstal, Rochester

BorstalBorstal, Kentthe town of Borstal
It was not until the mid-1870s that a revised program was accepted, which included the construction of a convict prison at Borstal, Rochester, to provide low cost labour for the construction of a line of four forts, Fort Borstal, Fort Bridgewood, Fort Horsted and Fort Luton (a further three forts were constructed with the use of convict labour).

Fort Borstal

Borstal
It was not until the mid-1870s that a revised program was accepted, which included the construction of a convict prison at Borstal, Rochester, to provide low cost labour for the construction of a line of four forts, Fort Borstal, Fort Bridgewood, Fort Horsted and Fort Luton (a further three forts were constructed with the use of convict labour).

Fort Luton

Luton
It was not until the mid-1870s that a revised program was accepted, which included the construction of a convict prison at Borstal, Rochester, to provide low cost labour for the construction of a line of four forts, Fort Borstal, Fort Bridgewood, Fort Horsted and Fort Luton (a further three forts were constructed with the use of convict labour).

Concrete

admixturesworkabilitypoured concrete
The fort was constructed almost entirely of concrete, topped with chalk and earth with no visible concrete exposed from the outside, except from the gorge or rear of the fort.

Chalk

chalk pitchalk rockblack chalk
The fort was constructed almost entirely of concrete, topped with chalk and earth with no visible concrete exposed from the outside, except from the gorge or rear of the fort.

Soil

soilsdirtsoil moisture
The fort was constructed almost entirely of concrete, topped with chalk and earth with no visible concrete exposed from the outside, except from the gorge or rear of the fort.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
In World War I brick emplacements and a pillbox were built on the ramparts, and fixed anti-aircraft guns of an early type were installed (possibly 12pdr coastal defence guns on improvised high angle mountings, not be confused with the later naval version).

Pillbox (military)

pillboxespillboxpill box
In World War I brick emplacements and a pillbox were built on the ramparts, and fixed anti-aircraft guns of an early type were installed (possibly 12pdr coastal defence guns on improvised high angle mountings, not be confused with the later naval version).

Anti-aircraft warfare

anti-aircraftanti-aircraft gunair defense
In World War I brick emplacements and a pillbox were built on the ramparts, and fixed anti-aircraft guns of an early type were installed (possibly 12pdr coastal defence guns on improvised high angle mountings, not be confused with the later naval version).

Hengist and Horsa

HengistHengestHorsa
Horsted is speculated to have been named after the legendary Saxon warrior Horsa, who was killed at nearby Aylesford while fighting the Britons.

Battle of Aylesford

AylesfordBattle of Epsford
Horsted is speculated to have been named after the legendary Saxon warrior Horsa, who was killed at nearby Aylesford while fighting the Britons.

Business park

office parkbusinessbusiness parks
The fort survives relatively intact and is currently in use as a business park.

Franks Casket

The miniature person inside the burial mound he grieves over would then be Horsa, who died at the battle of Ægelesthrep in 455 A.D. and was buried in a flint tumulus at Horsted near Aylesford.