Fort Sackville (Nova Scotia)

Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville was a British fort located in present-day Bedford, Nova Scotia that was built during Father Le Loutre's War.wikipedia
50 Related Articles

Bedford, Nova Scotia

BedfordTown of BedfordBedford, NS
Fort Sackville was a British fort located in present-day Bedford, Nova Scotia that was built during Father Le Loutre's War.
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Halifax, Nova Scotia

HalifaxHalifax Regional MunicipalityHalifax, NS
Father Le Loutre's War began when Edward Cornwallis arrived to establish Halifax with 13 transports on June 21, 1749.
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill) (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), and Lawrencetown (1754), all areas within the modern-day Regional Municipality.

Father Le Loutre's War

Father Le Loutre’s Wara guerrilla warengaged in a campaign to consolidate
Fort Sackville was a British fort located in present-day Bedford, Nova Scotia that was built during Father Le Loutre's War. Father Le Loutre's War began when Edward Cornwallis arrived to establish Halifax with 13 transports on June 21, 1749.
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill in 1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville in 1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Citadel Hill (Fort George)

Citadel HillHalifax Citadel(Citadel Hill)
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill) (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).
The fortified city walls guarded by five stockaded forts to protect against Mi'kmaq, Acadian, and French attacks was the centre of a network of forts Cornwallis built to protect settlements including Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Fort Edward (Nova Scotia)

Fort EdwardFort Edward National Historic SiteFort Edward, Nova Scotia
Within 18 months of establishing Halifax, the British also took firm control of peninsula Nova Scotia by building fortifications in all the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand Pre (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence). In early 1750, Captain Alexander Murray commanded at Fort Sackville (Nova Scotia) and then in September 1751 he was given command of Fort Edward (Nova Scotia).
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian, and French attacks on the new British Protestant settlements, the latter erected fortifications in Halifax (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753), and Lawrencetown (1754).

Scott Manor House

The British built the fort adjacent to present-day Scott Manor House, on a hill overlooking the Sackville River to help prevent French, Acadian and Mi'kmaq attacks on Halifax.
The house was built next to Fort Sackville, which was under the command of Joseph Scott (1760).

Fort Lawrence (Nova Scotia)

Fort LawrenceBeaubassinFort Lawrence NHS
Within 18 months of establishing Halifax, the British also took firm control of peninsula Nova Scotia by building fortifications in all the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand Pre (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753), and Lawrencetown (1754).

Lawrencetown, Halifax County, Nova Scotia

LawrencetownLawrencetown, Nova ScotiaLawerencetown
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill) (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Fort Vieux Logis

Within 18 months of establishing Halifax, the British also took firm control of peninsula Nova Scotia by building fortifications in all the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand Pre (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

40th (the 2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot

40th Regiment of Foot40th Foot40th Regiment
Lt. Robert Pateshall of the 40th Regiment of Foot was also stationed at the Fort while Gorham used Fort Sackville as his base from which he "scoured the country" for Mi'kmaq scalps as per Cornwallis' bounty set October 1749.
Additional members of the regiment formed the garrison of Fort Sackville and established themselves at Fort Edward.

George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville

Lord George SackvilleLord George GermainGeorge Germain
The fort was named after George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville.

Gorham's Rangers

RangersGorhamGorham's Independent Company of Rangers
Gorham's Rangers were primarily natives from Cape Cod, his own hometown.
Further, the company was involved in the establishment of Fort Sackville (Nova Scotia) and Fort Edward (Nova Scotia).

John Gorham (military officer)

John GorhamGorham's RangersGorham
On September 11, 1749, Cornwallis sent New England Ranger John Gorham (military officer) to build a fort at the mouth of the Sackville River.
In 1749, during Father Le Loutre's War, Gorham built Fort Sackville at present-day Bedford, Nova Scotia.

Siege of Grand Pré

Siege of Grand Preattacked Fort Vieux LogisGrand Pré
Cornwallis ordered Gorham to Piziquid November 9 in an attempt to relieve the Mi'kmaq and Acadian Siege of Grand Pre.
On March 18, 1750, Gorham’s Rangers left Fort Sackville (Nova Scotia), under orders from Governor Cornwallis to march to Pisiquid (Windsor).

Fort Beauséjour

Fort CumberlandFort BeausejourFort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland National Historic Site
A few days later, the same partisans also raided Fort Cumberland.
As tensions escalated, in 1749 British fortifications were erected in Nova Scotia at Citadel Hill, Halifax, and Fort Sackville, Bedford, while the French rebuilt the Fortress of Louisbourg, and re-occupied Fort Nerepis.

Alexander Murray (British Army officer, died 1762)

Alexander Murray
In early 1750, Captain Alexander Murray commanded at Fort Sackville (Nova Scotia) and then in September 1751 he was given command of Fort Edward (Nova Scotia).
At first he commanded at Fort Sackville and then in September 1751 he was given command of Fort Edward, where he remained for most of the ensuing seven years, except for a tour of duty at Halifax in 1753.

Battle at St. Croix

St. Croix
On his way he engaged in the surprise Battle at St. Croix with Mi'kmaq.
On March 18, 1750, according to British accounts of the battle, a group of Rangers under the command of John Gorham (military officer) left Fort Sackville (now Bedford, Nova Scotia), under orders from Cornwallis to march to Pisiguit (in present-day Windsor).

Military history of Nova Scotia

Military history of Nova Scotia - War of 1812American Revolution - Nova Scotia theatreInvasion of Martinique (1809)
To guard against Mi'kmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill) (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Royal Nova Scotia Volunteer Regiment

Royal N.S. VolunteersLoyal Nova Scotia Volunteers
As the war went on, the Royal Nova Scotia Volunteer Regiment became competent enough to serve as the garrison of the Fort, under day-to-day command of the senior captain, John Solomon.
Due to officer absences, the unit was under day-to-day command of the senior captain, John Solomon, at Fort Sackville.

Francis Bartelo

In August 1750, Cornwallis replaced Gorham at Fort Sackville with Captain Francis Bartelo, who was killed the following month in the Battle at Chignecto.
He was the commander at Fort Sackville in August 1750, when he served as second in command at the Battle at Chignecto.

Military history of the Miꞌkmaq people

Mi'kmaq militiaMilitary history of the Mi’kmaq PeopleMilitary history of the Mi'kmaq people
Because of the strength of the Acadian militia and Mi'kmaq militia, British officer John Knox wrote that "In the year 1757 we were said to be Masters of the province of Nova Scotia, or Acadia, which, however, was only an imaginary possession."
To guard against Miꞌkmaq, Acadian and French attacks on the new Protestant settlements, British fortifications were erected in Halifax (Citadel Hill) (1749), Bedford (Fort Sackville) (1749), Dartmouth (1750), Lunenburg (1753) and Lawrencetown (1754).

Royal Nova Scotia Regiment

During most of this period (1793–1802) Fort Sackville was garrisoned by detachments of the Royal Nova Scotia Regiment.

Military history of the Acadians

Acadian militiaAcadia militiaAcadians
Because of the strength of the Acadian militia and Mi'kmaq militia, British officer John Knox wrote that "In the year 1757 we were said to be Masters of the province of Nova Scotia, or Acadia, which, however, was only an imaginary possession."
He continues to state that the situation in the province was so precarious for the British that the "troops and inhabitants" at Fort Edward, Fort Sackville and Lunenburg "could not be reputed in any other light than as prisoners."

Joseph Scott (merchant)

Joseph Scott
He may even have acted as Commander of Fort Sackville for a short period around 1770.