Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

Fort UnionFort HenryForts UnionUnion
Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site is a partial reconstruction of the most important fur trading post on the upper Missouri, 1829-1867.wikipedia
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Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota.
The Missouri enters North Dakota near Fort Union, having drained more than half the land area of Montana (82000 sqmi).

Williston, North Dakota

WillistonWilliston, NDWillison
The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota.
Forts Union and Buford, as well as the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers—a part of the history of the Lewis and Clark Expedition—encourage area tourism.

Missouri River

MissouriMissouri riversUpper Missouri
The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota.
In 1828, the American Fur Company founded Fort Union at the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers.

Fur trade in Montana

fur tradefur trade in what became Montanafur trader
Until 1867, Fort Union was the central, and busiest, trading post on the upper Missouri, instrumental in developing the fur trade in Montana.
Notable individuals include Natawista (also known as Natoapxíxina, Na-ta-wis-ta-cha and Natoyist-Siksina ), who in 1840 married Major Alexander Culbertson, then the head of Fort Union, and Wambdi Autepewin, a Lakota woman widely known for her skills as a mediator.

Kenneth McKenzie (fur trader)

Kenneth McKenzieKenneth MacKenzie
Fort Union, possibly first known as Fort Henry or Fort Floyd, was built in 1828 or 1829 by the Upper Missouri Outfit managed by Kenneth McKenzie and was capitalized by John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company. Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, Sha-có-pay, Captain Joseph LaBarge, Kenneth McKenzie, Father Pierre DeSmet, George Catlin, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.
It was renamed the "Upper Missouri Outfit" division of American Fur, and in 1828, McKenzie went up the river to lead the fur trade, building Fort Union near the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers.

Crow people

CrowCrow NationCrow tribe
Here Assiniboine, Crow, Cree, Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Hidatsa, Lakota, and other tribes traded buffalo robes and furs for trade goods including beads, clay pipes, guns, blankets, knives, cookware, cloth, and alcohol.
River Crows went some times to the bigger Fort Union at the confluence of the Yellowstone and the Missouri.

Rudolf Friedrich Kurz

Rudolf Kurz
The historic site interprets how portions of the fort may have looked in 1851, based on archaeological excavations as well as drawings by contemporaries, including Rudolf Kurz, the post clerk in 1851.
During the summer, cholera broke out among the Indians, and nearly everyone except Kurz became ill. Blame for the sickness began to focus upon the artist, so he fled to Fort Union on August 18, 1851.

George Catlin

Catlin
Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, Sha-có-pay, Captain Joseph LaBarge, Kenneth McKenzie, Father Pierre DeSmet, George Catlin, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.
Two years later he ascended the Missouri River more than 3000 km to Fort Union Trading Post, near what is now the North Dakota-Montana border, where he spent several weeks among indigenous people who were still relatively untouched by European culture.

Joseph LaBarge

Captain Joseph LaBargeJoseph La BargeJoseph Marie La Barge
Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, Sha-có-pay, Captain Joseph LaBarge, Kenneth McKenzie, Father Pierre DeSmet, George Catlin, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.
In 1850 LaBarge was making a voyage aboard the steamer Saint Ange heading for Fort Union, on the upper Missouri River in the dense wilderness of north-west North Dakota.

Hugh Glass

Glass, Hugh
Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, Sha-có-pay, Captain Joseph LaBarge, Kenneth McKenzie, Father Pierre DeSmet, George Catlin, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.
He was later employed as a hunter for the U.S. Army garrison at Fort Union, near Williston, North Dakota.

Fort Buford

Fort Buford State Historic SiteBuford
In 1867, old Fort Union, A fur trading post dating back to 1829 and located 2 miles away by land, 7 by river, was bought by the Army and parts of it were demolished and used at Fort Buford during this construction phase.

Williams County, North Dakota

Williams CountyWilliamsWilliston, ND Micropolitan Statistical Area
The Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site is located in Williams County along the Missouri River on the Montana border.

Sha-có-pay

Historic visitors to the fort included John James Audubon, Sha-có-pay, Captain Joseph LaBarge, Kenneth McKenzie, Father Pierre DeSmet, George Catlin, Sitting Bull, Karl Bodmer, Hugh Glass, and Jim Bridger.
The portrait was painted during a trip to Fort Union in 1832.

Missouri-Yellowstone Confluence Interpretive Center

Featured exhibits are about the Corps of Discovery and their experiences in the area, Fort Buford, Fort Union and the fur-trade industry, and the development of transportation along the rivers.

Yellowstone River

Yellowstone2015 Yellowstone River oil spillupper Yellowstone River
The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota.

North Dakota

NDNorthState of North Dakota
The fort site is about two miles from the confluence of the Missouri River and its tributary, the Yellowstone River, on the North Dakota/Montana border, 25 miles from Williston, North Dakota.

National Historic Landmark

National Historic Landmark DistrictNational Historic LandmarksNational Historical Landmark
In 1961, the site became one of the earliest declared National Historic Landmarks in the United States and was named Fort Union Trading Post by the National Park Service to differentiate it from Fort Union National Monument, a historic frontier Army post in New Mexico.

National Park Service

U.S. National Park ServiceNational Park SystemUnited States National Park Service
In 1961, the site became one of the earliest declared National Historic Landmarks in the United States and was named Fort Union Trading Post by the National Park Service to differentiate it from Fort Union National Monument, a historic frontier Army post in New Mexico.

Fort Union National Monument

Fort UnionFort Union, New MexicoUnion
In 1961, the site became one of the earliest declared National Historic Landmarks in the United States and was named Fort Union Trading Post by the National Park Service to differentiate it from Fort Union National Monument, a historic frontier Army post in New Mexico.

New Mexico

NMState of New MexicoNew Mexican
In 1961, the site became one of the earliest declared National Historic Landmarks in the United States and was named Fort Union Trading Post by the National Park Service to differentiate it from Fort Union National Monument, a historic frontier Army post in New Mexico.

Fort Henry (North Dakota)

Fort HenryFort Henry on the Missouri River
Fort Union, possibly first known as Fort Henry or Fort Floyd, was built in 1828 or 1829 by the Upper Missouri Outfit managed by Kenneth McKenzie and was capitalized by John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company.

John Jacob Astor

AstorianAstorJohann Jakob Astor
Fort Union, possibly first known as Fort Henry or Fort Floyd, was built in 1828 or 1829 by the Upper Missouri Outfit managed by Kenneth McKenzie and was capitalized by John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company.

American Fur Company

American Fur Trading CompanyAmerican Fur Trading Co.1832 expedition
Fort Union, possibly first known as Fort Henry or Fort Floyd, was built in 1828 or 1829 by the Upper Missouri Outfit managed by Kenneth McKenzie and was capitalized by John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company.