A report on Founding of modern Singapore

Sir Stamford Raffles, founder of modern Singapore
The earliest known drawing of Singapore as viewed from the sea in 1823. The drawing shows buildings on the High Street with Fort Canning Hill known then simply as "The Hill" in the background.
View of Singapore, published in 1830 but drawn a few years earlier, showing the waters teeming with ships

The establishment of a British trading post in Singapore in 1819 by Sir Stamford Raffles led to its founding as a British colony in 1824.

- Founding of modern Singapore
Sir Stamford Raffles, founder of modern Singapore

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Singapore

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Sovereign island country and city-state in maritime Southeast Asia.

Sovereign island country and city-state in maritime Southeast Asia.

Letter from William Farquhar to Sultan Muhammad Kanzul Alam, the 21st Sultan of Brunei, dated 28 November 1819. In the first line, Farquhar mentions that Sultan Hussein Shah and Temenggong Abdul Rahman allowed the British East India Company to establish a factory in Singapore on 6 February 1819.
1825 survey map. Singapore's free port trade was at Singapore River for 150 years. Fort Canning hill (centre) was home to its ancient and early colonial rulers.
British evacuation in 1945 after the Japanese surrender. Kallang Airport's control tower near the city has been conserved.
Singapore thrived as an entrepôt. In the 1960s, bumboats were used to transport cargoes and supplies between nearshore ships and Singapore River.
Lee Kuan Yew, the first prime minister of Singapore
The Istana is the official residence and office of the President, as well as the working office of the Prime Minister.
The Supreme Court (left) and the Parliament House (right) where the Singapore Parliament convenes.
Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the 2017 G20 meeting in Germany. Since 2010, Singapore has often been invited to participate in G20 processes.
In 2007, Singaporean troopers were deployed in Afghanistan as part of a multinational coalition.
Republic of Singapore Air Force Black Knights perform at the Singapore Air Show.
Speakers' Corner in Chinatown provides a public demonstration and "free speech" area usually restricted in other parts of the island.
An outline of Singapore and the surrounding islands and waterways
Singapore Botanic Gardens is a UNESCO World Heritage Site – one of three gardens in the world, and the only tropical garden, to be recognised as such.
Singapore Airlines, the country's flag carrier, celebrated the nation's 2015 Golden Jubilee with a flag livery on its Airbus A380.
A proportional representation of Singapore exports, 2019
The Merlion, the official mascot of Singapore
The world's first urban congestion-pricing scheme started in the city centre in 1975 and was fully automated by Electronic Road Pricing in 1998.
Chinese (East Asian), Malay (Southeast Asian), and Indian (South Asian) women in Singapore, circa 1890. To promote racial harmony among the three races, a unique Racial Harmony Day is celebrated on 21 July every year.
Singapore Management University is one of six autonomous universities in the city-state
National University Hospital is the second largest hospital in the city, serving one million patients yearly.
Ornate details on top of Sri Mariamman Temple in Chinatown district, Singapore's oldest Hindu temple since 1827
The National Gallery Singapore oversees the world's largest public collection of Singapore and Southeast Asian art
Lau Pa Sat hawker centre in the financial district. Satay cart-stalls roll in after dusk, on a side street.
Joseph Schooling is a gold medalist and Olympic record holder at the Rio 2016 Games – 100 m butterfly.
The Ministry of Communications and Information oversees the development of Infocomm, Media and the arts.
Lee Kuan Yew, the first prime minister of Singapore
The Speakers' Corner at Hong Lim Park provides a public demonstration and "free speech" area for Singaporeans often restricted in other parts of the country.

Its contemporary era began in 1819 when Stamford Raffles established Singapore as an entrepôt trading post of the British Empire.

Temenggong Abdul Rahman

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The Temenggong of Johor during the Bendahara dynasty.

The Temenggong of Johor during the Bendahara dynasty.

He was best known of being instrumental in the Treaty of Singapore with the British East India Company in 1819.

Fort Canning Hill

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Small hill, about 48 m high, in the southeast portion of the island city-state of Singapore, within the Central Area that forms Singapore's central business district.

Small hill, about 48 m high, in the southeast portion of the island city-state of Singapore, within the Central Area that forms Singapore's central business district.

1825 map of Singapore. The Fort Canning Hill area was bounded on its north by ruins of an old wall marked as Old Lines of Singapore and to the south by Singapore River
Jewelry found at Fort Canning Hill dating to the mid-14th century
The earliest known drawing of Singapore from 1823, with Fort Canning Hill in the background, known simply as "The Hill" in the early years.
Fort Canning viewed from the Singapore River at the end of the 19th century
Raffles House, but not the original built by Raffles, which was a wood and atap structure.
The Gate of Fort Canning
9-Pound Cannon
Escalator at Fort Canning Park
The entrance of Fort Canning Park on Hill Street
A sally port on Fort Canning Hill
The Battle Box, Underground Far East Command Centre
Gravestones in Fort Canning Green, relocated from Bukit Timah Cemetery
Fort Canning Centre
Keramat Iskandar Shah

On 6 February 1819, Temenggong Abdul Rahman and Sultan Hussein Shah signed The Singapore Treaty with Stamford Raffles.

Hussein Shah of Johor

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The 18th ruler of Johor-Riau.

The 18th ruler of Johor-Riau.

He signed two treaties with Britain which culminated in the founding of modern Singapore; during which he was given recognition as the Sultan of Johor and Singapore in 1819 and the Sultan of Johor in 1824.