Fourth television network

fourth networkfourth major networkMGM/UA Premiere NetworkUniversal Pictures Debut Networkfourth commercial networkMGM Family Networkfour major American broadcasting TV networksfour major networksfourth "major network,fourth major broadcast network
In American television terminology, a fourth network is a reference to a fourth broadcast (over-the-air) television network, as opposed to the Big Three television networks that dominated U.S. television from the 1950s to the 1990s: ABC, CBS and NBC.wikipedia
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Fox Broadcasting Company

FoxFox networkFox.com
The October 1986 launch of the Fox Broadcasting Company was met with ridicule.
Launched on October 9, 1986, as a competitor to the Big Three television networks (ABC, CBS and NBC), Fox went on to become the most successful attempt at a fourth television network.

Hughes Television Network

Sports Network IncorporatedHughesHughes Sports Network
Millionaire Howard Hughes purchased the network in 1968, changing its name to the Hughes Television Network.
It never lived up to its dream of being the nation's fourth television network, following the demise of the DuMont Television Network.

Big Three television networks

Big ThreeBig Three networksbig three network
In American television terminology, a fourth network is a reference to a fourth broadcast (over-the-air) television network, as opposed to the Big Three television networks that dominated U.S. television from the 1950s to the 1990s: ABC, CBS and NBC.
A viable fourth television network in the commercial sense would not again become competitive with the Big Three until Fox was founded in October 1986 from some of the assets and remnants of the DuMont network, which had become Metromedia after DuMont folded, and were acquired by News Corporation earlier in 1986.

Independent station (North America)

independent stationIndependentindependent stations
The end of the DuMont Network left many UHF stations without a reliable source of programming, and many were left to become independent stations.
In 1986 several independent outlets, led by the Metromedia stations, formed the Fox Broadcasting Company, the first major venture at a fourth U.S. broadcast television network since the DuMont Television Network shut down in August 1956 (which resulted in some of its affiliates, including those owned by Metromedia, becoming independents).

Overmyer Network

United NetworkOvermyer Broadcasting
In late 1966, Overmyer announced plans for a new fourth network, named the Overmyer Network.
It was intended to be a fourth national commercial network in the United States, competing with the Big Three television networks.

Daniel H. Overmyer

Daniel OvermyerD'''aniel '''H'''. '''O'''vermyer
Millionaire Daniel Overmyer built a chain of five UHF stations during the mid-1960s.
In 1964, Overmyer also established the Overmyer Communications Company to own and operate several UHF television stations as part of the larger Overmyer Network, an attempt by Overmyer to create a fourth television network.

Television network

networknetwork televisionTV network
In American television terminology, a fourth network is a reference to a fourth broadcast (over-the-air) television network, as opposed to the Big Three television networks that dominated U.S. television from the 1950s to the 1990s: ABC, CBS and NBC.
The Fox Broadcasting Company, founded by the Rupert Murdoch-owned News Corporation (now owned by Fox Corporation), was launched on October 9, 1986 after the company purchased the television assets of Metromedia; it would eventually ascend to the status of the fourth major network by 1994.

Operation Prime Time

OPTOPT Organisation
In the 1970s, the "occasional" television networks started to appear with greater frequency with Norman Lear, Mobil Showcase Network, Capital Cities Communications, and Operation Prime Time, all entering the fray along with Metromedia.
During its existence, OPT was considered the de facto fourth television network.

The Las Vegas Show

The name was later changed to the United Network, but the network itself broadcast only for a single month, and aired only one program, The Las Vegas Show.
The two-hour-long talk show, hosted by comedian Bill Dana, was supposed to be the flagship program of a planned fourth television network.

Paramount Television Service

a new television networkfourth networknetwork
In 1977, Paramount Pictures made tentative plans to launch the Paramount Television Service, or Paramount Programming Service, a new fourth television network.
The Paramount Television Service (or PTVS for short and also known as Paramount Programming Service ) was the name of a proposed but ultimately unrealized "fourth television network" from the U.S. film studio Paramount Pictures (then a unit of Gulf+Western, now owned by Viacom).

National Educational Television

NETEducational Television and Radio CenterNational Educational Television (NET)
WNTA-TV became WNDT (later WNET), the flagship station of the National Educational Television network, a forerunner of PBS.
The center became more aggressive at this time, aiming to ascend to the role of the U.S.' fourth television network.

MGM Television

MGM/UA TelevisionMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer TelevisionMGM Worldwide Television Distribution
MGM Television entered the field with its self-proclaimed fourth network, the MGM Family Network (MFN), on September 9, 1973 with the movie The Yearling on 145 stations.
MGM TV started its own Television network, MGM Family Network (MFN), or MGM Television Network, on September 9, 1973 on 145 stations.

The Attic: The Hiding of Anne Frank

The AtticTV-movie about Anne Frank
Programs on the Golden Showcase included The Attic: The Hiding of Anne Frank, and Little Girl Lost.
The film was broadcast as part of an ad hoc network, Kraft Golden Showcase Network.

WFLD

WFLD-TVFox ChicagoFox News Chicago
Kaiser owned eight UHF television stations, most of them in large cities, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston, and Detroit.
That October, News Corporation—which had purchased a 50% interest in 20th Century Fox corporate parent TCF Holdings for $250 million in March 1985—announced its intentions to create a fourth television network that would use the resources of 20th Century Fox Television to both produce and distribute programming, intending to compete with ABC, CBS and NBC.

Norman Lear

[Norman] LearAct III CommunicationsNorman Lear: Just Another Vision of You
In the 1970s, the "occasional" television networks started to appear with greater frequency with Norman Lear, Mobil Showcase Network, Capital Cities Communications, and Operation Prime Time, all entering the fray along with Metromedia.
He planned in 1977 to offer three hours of prime-time Saturday programming directly, with the stations placing his production company in the position of an occasional network.

DuMont Television Network

DuMontDuMont NetworkDMN
When the U.S. television industry was in its infancy in the 1940s, there were four major full-time television networks that operated across the country: ABC, CBS, NBC and the DuMont Television Network.

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount British Pictures
In 1977, Paramount Pictures made tentative plans to launch the Paramount Television Service, or Paramount Programming Service, a new fourth television network.
"High concept" pictures such as Saturday Night Fever and Grease hit big, hit hard and hit fast all over the world, and Diller's television background led him to propose one of his longest-standing ideas to the board: Paramount Television Service, a fourth commercial network.

Paramount Television Network

ParamountMovietown, RSVPParamount Television
Although other companies – including Paramount Pictures and the Mutual Broadcasting System – announced network plans or began limited network operations, these companies withdrew from television after the first few years.
In 1978, Paramount CEO Barry Diller planned to launch the Paramount Television Service, a new "fourth television network"; its programs would have aired only one night a week.

Paramount Domestic Television

Paramount Television SalesDomestic TelevisionParamount
MCA Television and Paramount Domestic Television (PDT) had formed Premier Advertiser Sales, a joint venture created for the sale of advertising for their existing syndicated programs in September 1989, from which PPS likely took its name and served as an outgrowth.
As a possible outgrowth of this sales joint venture, MCA and Paramount began plans for a new network, Premier Program Service.

Mizlou Television Network

MizlouMizlou CommunicationsMizlou Sports News Network
The network finally launched under the name Mizlou Television Network in 1968, but the concept had changed.

Fox NFL

FoxNFL on FoxThe OT
Then in December 1993, Fox hit a major milestone that led to one of the most sweeping changes in American television when it took the rights to the NFL from CBS, a move that by most accounts firmly established it as the fourth major television network.
Indeed, Fox was still an upstart player in 1993, not yet considered on par with CBS, NBC and ABC, the three longer established major networks (Fox, by comparison, had debuted in October 1986 as the only venture at a fourth television network since the 1956 demise of the DuMont Television Network to truly compete with the "Big Three").

Sylvester Weaver (executive)

Pat WeaverSylvester "Pat" WeaverSylvester Weaver
Pat Weaver, a former president of NBC, twice attempted to launch his own television network.
Weaver proposed on at least two occasions a fourth television network (dubbed the "Pat Weaver Prime Time Network") that never came to fruition.

Universal Television

NBC ProductionsUniversal Media StudiosNBC Studios
MCA Television and Paramount Domestic Television (PDT) had formed Premier Advertiser Sales, a joint venture created for the sale of advertising for their existing syndicated programs in September 1989, from which PPS likely took its name and served as an outgrowth. The Universal Pictures Debut Network, or simply the Debut Network, was a similar ad-hoc film network created by MCA Television.
The company launched the Universal Pictures Debut Network, an ad-hoc film network with plans to launch in two stages beginning in September 1985.

Action Pack (TV programming block)

Action PackBack2Back Action HourAction Pack (Universal Television)
PTEN, Spelling Premiere Network, Family Network and proposed WB Network & Paramount Network were being shopped in January 1994 against syndicated blocks the Disney Afternoon and Universal's "Action Pack."
First, MCA TV launched the ad-hoc movie Universal Pictures Debut Network in 1985.

SFM Entertainment

SFM Media Service CorporationSFM MediaSFM Media Corporation
In 1978, SFM Media Service, which assisted with the Mobil Showcase Network, launched its own occasional network, the SFM Holiday Network and the General Foods Golden Showcase Network.