Fox NFL

FoxNFL on FoxThe OTNFLFox Sportstelevision rightsbroadcast rightsNational Football LeagueFox's NFL coverageNFL coverage
Fox NFL (also known as NFL on Fox) is the branding used for broadcasts of National Football League (NFL) games produced by Fox Sports and televised on the Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox).wikipedia
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Fox Broadcasting Company

FoxFox networkFox.com
Fox NFL (also known as NFL on Fox) is the branding used for broadcasts of National Football League (NFL) games produced by Fox Sports and televised on the Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox).
Most viewers in Canada have access to at least one U.S.-based Fox affiliate, either free-to-air or through a pay television provider, although Fox's National Football League broadcasts and most of its prime time programming are subject to simultaneous substitution regulations for pay television providers imposed by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to protect rights held by domestically based networks.

Fox NFL Sunday

Fox NFL ThursdayFox's own NFL pregame showNFL Sunday
Game coverage is usually preceded by the pre-game shows Fox NFL Kickoff and Fox NFL Sunday and is followed on most weeks by post-game show The OT.
Fox NFL Sunday is an American sports television program on Fox that debuted on September 4, 1994, and serves as the pre-game show for the network's National Football League game telecasts under the Fox NFL brand.

Fox NFL Kickoff

NFL Kickoff
Game coverage is usually preceded by the pre-game shows Fox NFL Kickoff and Fox NFL Sunday and is followed on most weeks by post-game show The OT.
Fox NFL Kickoff is an American sports television program that originally debuted on FS1 on September 8, 2013, and moved to Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox) on September 13, 2015, and serves as the secondary pre-game show for the network's National Football League (NFL) game telecasts under the NFL on Fox brand.

Doubleheader (television)

doubleheaderdoubleheadersdouble headers
In weeks when Fox airs a doubleheader, the late broadcast (which airs nationwide in nearly all markets, there typically being only one or two games taking place at the time) airs under the brand America's Game of the Week.
The two networks that hold the rights to broadcast NFL games on Sunday afternoons – Fox and CBS – both typically air doubleheaders during the regular season (with the other network only being permitted to broadcast one game in a specific market; each network is given eight doubleheaders to broadcast during the season, and both networks are given doubleheaders during the final week of the season in order for games with playoff implications to have the most exposure), with restrictions applying to some markets in which the local team is playing at home that week.

Monday Night Football

ESPNABCMonday night
In 1987, Fox's first full year on the air, ABC initially hedged on renewing its contract to carry Monday Night Football – then the league's crown-jewel program – as was in the middle of negotiations to reach a new contract, due to an increased expense of the rights.
This was a move which would ultimately mean the end of Monday Night Football on ABC (cable games are protected from the NFL's flexible scheduling rule adopted for the 2006–07 season; the new rule applies only to CBS, Fox, and NBC's Sunday night games).

1994 NFL season

19941994 season1995
Coverage formally began the following month on September 4, with the premiere of Fox NFL Sunday, followed by a slate of six regionally televised regular season games on the first Sunday of the 1994 season. Fox's coverage, in addition to being able to televise NFC regular season and playoff games, also included the exclusive U.S. television rights to Super Bowl XXXI (held in 1997) under the initial contract, which took effect with the 1994 season.
This was also the first season that the then eight-year old Fox network televised NFL games; the network had started its own sports division a year prior.

1994 San Francisco 49ers season

San Francisco 49ers49ers1994
The network aired its inaugural NFL game telecast on August 12, 1994, with a preseason game between the Denver Broncos and the San Francisco 49ers at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

Super Bowl XXXI

XXXI1996Super Bowl
Fox's coverage, in addition to being able to televise NFC regular season and playoff games, also included the exclusive U.S. television rights to Super Bowl XXXI (held in 1997) under the initial contract, which took effect with the 1994 season.
This was the first Super Bowl broadcast by Fox under its first contract to carry NFL games.

John Madden

All-MaddenMaddenAll-Madden Team
Fox was also able to procure Pat Summerall and John Madden to be its lead broadcast team, a capacity they had been serving for CBS.
Madden worked as a color analyst for all four major networks: CBS (1979–1993), Fox (1994–2001), ABC (2002–2005), and NBC (2006–2008).

Matt Millen

Millen, Matt
Dick Stockton and Matt Millen also came over from CBS and became the network's #2 broadcast team, while James Brown, who had called play-by-play for CBS' game telecasts, was hired to be the studio host.
His last job before joining the Lions was as a member of the number two broadcast team for NFL on Fox, as well as being the color commentator for Monday Night Football on Westwood One.

New World Pictures

New World CommunicationsNew World TelevisionNew World Entertainment
Despite having a few successful shows in its slate, the network did not have a significant market share until the early 1990s when Fox parent News Corporation (which became 21st Century Fox through the July 2013 spin-off of its publishing unit, now the current News Corp.) began to upgrade some of its local affiliates – and eventually purchased additional stations from other television station groups, such as New World Communications and Chris-Craft Industries' BHC Communications and United Television, making it the largest owner of television stations in the United States.
The deal would include most of the stations that New World was in the midst of acquiring from Argyle and Citicasters, with all of the affected stations joining Fox after existing affiliation contracts with their then-current network partners concluded (WDAF-TV and KSAZ-TV were the first to switch on September 12, 1994, when Fox televised its inaugural regular-season NFL games; KDFW, KTBC and KTVI switched on July 1, 1995, while all but three of the other stations that remained under New World ownership switched on either December 11 or 12, 1994).

Big Three television networks

Big ThreeBig Three networksbig three network
Though Fox was growing rapidly as a network, and had established itself as a presence, it was still not considered a major competitor to the more-established "Big Three" broadcast networks (ABC, CBS and NBC).
Fox, which began as a distant fourth network, leapfrogged into major network status in 1994 after must-carry rules took effect; the rules allowed Fox affiliates to force their way onto cable lineups, and the network's affiliation deal with New World Communications, which it later purchased in 1996, and the acquisition of National Football League broadcast rights brought a wave of new Fox affiliates.

Fox Sports (United States)

Fox SportsFoxsports
Fox NFL (also known as NFL on Fox) is the branding used for broadcasts of National Football League (NFL) games produced by Fox Sports and televised on the Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox).

NBC Sunday Night Football

Sunday Night FootballNBCSunday night
Six years after its first attempt, the league's television contracts for both conferences and for the Sunday and Monday prime time football packages came up for renewal again in 1993.
CBS and Fox could each protect four of its games during Weeks 10 through 15 and also each protect one of its games for Week 17; however, these two networks had to decide which games to protect in early October 2006, after Week 4 of the NFL season.

Foxnet

In addition, there were some smaller markets that were not yet served by a local Fox affiliate; back in 1991, the Foxnet cable channel began operations to provide the network's programming to those areas until a new over-the-air affiliate was made available.
Many smaller markets were served by three or fewer commercial stations, most of which were already affiliated with at least one of the existing major broadcast networks, leaving Fox's only options to reach these areas being to either settle for a secondary affiliation with one of the major network stations (which would have forced Fox programs to air in off-peak timeslots subject to lower viewership) or affiliate with a spare low-power station, which often carried low-quality schedules prevalent with home shopping or paid programming outside of primetime and were usually associated with networks such as Channel America; the network rarely utilized either option in order to not associate their programming with low-effort stations and networks, leaving it with gaps in national clearance in several smaller markets, while it only carried secondary affiliations on Big Three stations only starting in 1994 to distribute their NFL coverage in some scattered markets until a stand-alone station could launch.

Joe Buck

JoeJoe Duck
Following the 1997 season, Joe Buck did not call another NFL game on Fox until 2001.
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award.

Salary cap

NFL salary capcap spacewage cap
The unexpectedly high bids from Fox and other networks increased the NFL salary cap, new in 1994, to $34 million from the predicted $32 million.
The cap was first introduced for the 1994 season and was expected to be $32 million, but an unexpectedly high bid from Fox and other networks increased the cap to $34.6 million.

Jerry Glanville

The football game (called by Sam Rosen and Jerry Glanville) began as scheduled and was shown in split screen.
Glanville has worked as an analyst on HBO's Inside the NFL, CBS's The NFL Today/NFL on CBS and Fox's coverage of the NFL.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
Though Fox was growing rapidly as a network, and had established itself as a presence, it was still not considered a major competitor to the more-established "Big Three" broadcast networks (ABC, CBS and NBC).
However, NBC Sports would suffer a major blow in 1998, when it lost the rights to the American Football Conference (AFC) to CBS, which itself had lost rights to the National Football Conference (NFC) to Fox four years earlier; the deal stripped NBC of National Football League (NFL) game telecasts after 59 years and AFC games after 36 years (dating back to its existence as the American Football League prior to its 1970 merger with the NFL).

Super Bowl XLII

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The telecast ended up being the highest-rated program in the history of the then ten-year-old Fox network, and it currently ties Super Bowl XLII for the highest-rated program in the entire history of the network.
The telecast of the game on Fox broke the then-record for the most watched Super Bowl in history with an average of 97.5 million viewers in the United States.

WVUE-DT

WVUEWVUE-TV8
In the NFC markets affected by the deals, Fox gained VHF affiliates in eight primary markets (Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit, Green Bay, New Orleans, Phoenix, St. Louis and Tampa) and three satellite markets (Austin, Greensboro and Milwaukee), adding to the four that the network had before the deal.
On December 18, 1993, the Fox Broadcasting Company outbid CBS for the rights to the NFL's National Football Conference television package.

WJBK

WJBK-TVDetroitWJBK 2
In the NFC markets affected by the deals, Fox gained VHF affiliates in eight primary markets (Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit, Green Bay, New Orleans, Phoenix, St. Louis and Tampa) and three satellite markets (Austin, Greensboro and Milwaukee), adding to the four that the network had before the deal.
Fox made the investment to comply with their winning bid for the broadcast rights to the NFL's National Football Conference.

FoxBox (sports)

FoxBoxconstant scoring displaysFox Box
Fox's NFL coverage also introduced bolder and innovative graphics, for instance, the FoxBox, a continuous on-screen time-and-score graphic that Hill had originally used on Sky Sports's coverage of the Premier League.
After the Fox TV network acquired the rights to NFL games in 1994, producer David Hill suggested that football games always show the score and time.

WITI (TV)

WITIWITI-TVFox 6
In the NFC markets affected by the deals, Fox gained VHF affiliates in eight primary markets (Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit, Green Bay, New Orleans, Phoenix, St. Louis and Tampa) and three satellite markets (Austin, Greensboro and Milwaukee), adding to the four that the network had before the deal.
On May 23, 1994, as part of a broad deal that also saw News Corporation acquire a 20% equity interest in the company, New World Communications signed a long-term agreement to affiliate its nine CBS-, ABC- or NBC-affiliated television stations with Fox, which sought to strengthen its affiliate portfolio after the National Football League (NFL) accepted the network's $1.58 billion bid for the television rights to the National Football Conference (NFC) – a four-year contract that began with the 1994 NFL season – on December 18, 1993.

WAGA-TV

WAGAAtlantaWAGA 5
In the NFC markets affected by the deals, Fox gained VHF affiliates in eight primary markets (Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit, Green Bay, New Orleans, Phoenix, St. Louis and Tampa) and three satellite markets (Austin, Greensboro and Milwaukee), adding to the four that the network had before the deal.
On May 23, 1994, as part of a broad deal that also saw News Corporation acquire a 20% equity interest in the company, New World Communications signed a long-term agreement to affiliate its nine CBS-, ABC- or NBC-affiliated television stations with Fox, which sought to strengthen its affiliate portfolio after the National Football League (NFL) accepted the network's $1.58 billion bid for the television rights to the National Football Conference (NFC) – a four-year contract that began with the 1994 NFL season – on December 18, 1993.