François-Joseph Fétis

FétisFétis, François-JosephF.-J. FétisFétis, F. J.Fétis, F.-J.Fétis F-J.Biographie universelleFJ FétisFrançois-JosephJoseph Fétis
François-Joseph Fétis (25 March 1784 – 26 March 1871) was a Belgian musicologist, composer, teacher, and one of the most influential music critics of the 19th century.wikipedia
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Saint Waltrude Collegiate Church

canoness of the Saint Waltrude Collegiate Churchcanonesse of Saint Waltrude Collegiate Churchchapter of canonesses of St Waltrude
His father was titular organist of the noble chapter of Saint-Waltrude.
Antoine-Joseph Fetis, titular organist, taught his eldest son François-Joseph the first steps of the practice of organ music.

Royal Conservatory of Brussels

Brussels ConservatoryBrussels ConservatoireConservatoire royal de Bruxelles
Fétis remained in the French capital till 1833, when at the request of Leopold I, he became director of the Royal Conservatory of Brussels and the king's chapelmaster.
Providing performing music and drama courses, the institution became renowned partly because of the international reputation of its successive directors such as François-Joseph Fétis, François-Auguste Gevaert, Edgar Tinel, Joseph Jongen or Marcel Poot, but more because it has been attended by many of the top musicians, actors and artists in Belgium such as Arthur Grumiaux, José Van Dam, Sigiswald Kuijken, Josse De Pauw, Luk van Mello and Luk De Konink.

Pierre-François-Joseph Robert

François Robert
In October 1806 he married to Adélaïde-Louise-Catherine Robert, daughter of the French politician Pierre-François-Joseph Robert and Louise de Keralio, friend of Robespierre.
He married Louise-Félicité de Kéralio and their daughter, Adélaïde Robert, married the famous Belgian musicologist François-Joseph Fétis.

Conservatoire de Paris

Paris ConservatoireParis ConservatoryConservatoire
In 1821 he was appointed professor at the Paris Conservatory.
Cherubini maintained high standards and his staff included teachers such as François-Joseph Fétis, Habeneck, Fromental Halévy, Le Sueur, Ferdinando Paer, and Anton Reicha.

Music criticism

music criticmusic criticscritics
François-Joseph Fétis (25 March 1784 – 26 March 1871) was a Belgian musicologist, composer, teacher, and one of the most influential music critics of the 19th century.
In subsequent years a number of regular journals dedicated to music criticism and reviews began to appear in major European centres, including The Harmonicon (London 1823-33), The Musical Times (London, 1844-date), the Revue et gazette musicale de Paris (Paris 1827-1880, founded by François-Joseph Fétis), the Berliner allgemeine musikalische Zeitung founded in 1825 by A.M. Schlesinger and edited by A. B. Marx, and the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik founded in 1834 in Leipzig by Robert Schumann and Friedrich Wieck, and later edited by Franz Brendel.

Louis-Barthélémy Pradher

Félicité Pradher
In 1800 he went to Paris and completed his studies at the Conservatory under such masters as Boïeldieu, Jean-Baptiste Rey and Louis-Barthélémy Pradher.
Among his students were François-Joseph Fétis, Charles-Laurent Rhein, as well as the Herz brothers, Jacques-Simom Herz and Henri Herz.

Louise Bertin

BertinLouiseLouise Angelique Bertin
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
She received lessons from François-Joseph Fétis, who directed a private family performance of Guy Mannering, Bertin's first opera, in 1825.

Mons

County of MonsMons, BelgiumMontes
Fétis was born in Mons, Hainaut, eldest son of Antoine-Joseph Fetis and Elisabeth Desprets, daughter of a famous chirurgical doctor.

Charles-Marie Widor

WidorCharles Marie WidorCharles Widor
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
The French organ builder Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, reviver of the art of organ building, was a friend of the Widor family; he arranged for the talented young organist to study in Brussels in 1863 with Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens for organ technique and with the elderly François-Joseph Fétis, director of the Brussels Conservatoire, for composition.

Adolphe Samuel

His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
He spent much time in Brussels where he was a pupil of François-Joseph Fétis, and where he was a friend of Hector Berlioz.

Ferdinand Hérold

HéroldLouis Joseph Ferdinand HeroldLouis Joseph Ferdinand Hérold
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
While there, he also took musical theory with François-Joseph Fétis (who later edited the periodical La Revue musicale).

Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens

LemmensJaak-Nicolaas LemmensJacques Nicolas Lemmens
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
Born at Zoerle-Parwijs, near Westerlo, Belgium, Lemmens took lessons from François-Joseph Fétis, who wanted to make him into a musician capable of renewing the organ-player's art in Belgium.

Luigi Agnesi

His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
There he had studied with Charles-Marie-François Bosselet (harmony) and the François-Joseph Fétis (music composition).

Frantz Jehin-Prume

His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
He was a pupil of Hubert Léonard and François-Joseph Fétis at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels.

William Cusins

Sir William CusinsSir William George CusinsWilliam George Cusins
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
Born in London, Cusins entered the Chapel Royal in his tenth year and studied music in Brussels under François-Joseph Fétis and later at the Royal Academy of Music (RAM) in London, under Cipriani Potter, William Sterndale Bennett, Charles Lucas and Prosper Sainton.

Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga

ArriagaJuan Crisóstomo de ArriagaJuan Arriaga
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
These included violin under Pierre Baillot, counterpoint with Luigi Cherubini and harmony under François-Joseph Fétis at the Paris Conservatoire.

Fernando Sor

SorFerran SorFerdinand Sor
Fétis produced a large quantity of original compositions, from the opera and the oratorio to the simple chanson, including several musical hoaxes, the most famous of which is the "Lute concerto by Valentin Strobel", premiered with Fernando Sor as soloist.
François-Joseph Fétis has called him "le Beethoven de la guitare", though he has also remarked that Sor had failed to produce a good tone on one occasion.

Julius Eichberg

His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
He was a pupil of Belgian composer Charles Auguste de Bériot, studied composition under François-Joseph Fétis, and studied violin under Lambert Joseph Meerts.

Royal Academy of Science, Letters and Fine Arts of Belgium

Académie royale des sciences, des lettres et des beaux-arts de BelgiqueRoyal Academy of BelgiumAcadémie royale de Belgique
* Founding members: Nicaise de Keyser, Eugène Simonis, Louis Gallait, Jan August Hendrik Leys, Jean-Baptiste Madou, François-Joseph Navez, Henri van der Haert, Eugène Joseph Verboeckhoven, Gustaf Wappers, Guillaume Geefs, Joseph-Pierre Braemt, Tilman-François Suys, Louis Roelandt, Charles Auguste de Bériot, François-Joseph Fétis, Théodore-Gérard Hanssen and Henri Vieuxtemps.

Jean-Delphin Alard

Jean Delphin AlardAlardDelphin Alard
His pupils included Luigi Agnesi, Jean-Delphin Alard, Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga, Louise Bertin, William Cusins, Julius Eichberg, Ferdinand Hérold, Frantz Jehin-Prume, Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, Adolphe Samuel, and Charles-Marie Widor.
He was also a pupil of François-Joseph Fétis.

Giacomo Meyerbeer

MeyerbeerMeyerbeer, GiacomoG. Meyerbeer
L'Africaine was eventually premiered after Meyerbeer's death at the Salle Le Peletier on 28 April 1865 in a performing edition undertaken by François-Joseph Fétis.

Arthur Pougin

Pougin, ArthurPougin
His work in connection with Fétis's Biographie universelle, for which he prepared a supplement (two volumes, 1878–80), has, however, been found to be lacking in thoroughness.

Belgium

BelgianBELKingdom of Belgium
François-Joseph Fétis (25 March 1784 – 26 March 1871) was a Belgian musicologist, composer, teacher, and one of the most influential music critics of the 19th century.

Musicology

musicologistmusicologistsmusicological
François-Joseph Fétis (25 March 1784 – 26 March 1871) was a Belgian musicologist, composer, teacher, and one of the most influential music critics of the 19th century.

Composer

music composercomposedmusic
François-Joseph Fétis (25 March 1784 – 26 March 1871) was a Belgian musicologist, composer, teacher, and one of the most influential music critics of the 19th century.