Francis Bacon

Sir Francis BaconBaconLord BaconBaconianFrancis Bacon, 1st Baron VerulamBacon, FrancisViscount St AlbanFrancis Bacon, 1st Viscount St AlbansLord Chancellor BaconViscount St Albans
Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of England.wikipedia
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Scientific method

scientific researchscientificmethod
His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution.
Important debates in the history of science concern rationalism, especially as advocated by René Descartes; inductivism and/or empiricism, as argued for by Francis Bacon, and rising to particular prominence with Isaac Newton and his followers; and hypothetico-deductivism, which came to the fore in the early 19th century.

Scientific Revolution

scientificscientific revolutionsscience
His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution.
Much of the change of attitude came from Francis Bacon whose "confident and emphatic announcement" in the modern progress of science inspired the creation of scientific societies such as the Royal Society, and Galileo who championed Copernicus and developed the science of motion.

Baconian method

BaconianIdols of the mindBaconian natural history
Although his practical ideas about such a method, the Baconian method, did not have a long-lasting influence, the general idea of the importance and possibility of a sceptical methodology makes Bacon the father of the scientific method.
The Baconian method, commonly known as the scientific method, is the investigative method developed by Sir Francis Bacon.

Nicholas Bacon (Lord Keeper)

Nicholas BaconSir Nicholas BaconSir Nicolas Bacon
Francis Bacon was born on 22 January 1561 at York House near the Strand in London, the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon (Lord Keeper of the Great Seal) by his second wife, Anne (Cooke) Bacon, the daughter of the noted Renaissance humanist Anthony Cooke.
He was the father of the philosopher and statesman Sir Francis Bacon.

Anthony Bacon (1558–1601)

Anthony BaconAnthonyBacon, Anthony (1558–1601)
He went up to Trinity College at the University of Cambridge on 5 April 1573 at the age of 12, living for three years there, together with his older brother Anthony Bacon under the personal tutelage of Dr John Whitgift, future Archbishop of Canterbury.
He was Francis Bacon's brother.

Anne Bacon

Anne CookeAnn CookeAnne
Francis Bacon was born on 22 January 1561 at York House near the Strand in London, the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon (Lord Keeper of the Great Seal) by his second wife, Anne (Cooke) Bacon, the daughter of the noted Renaissance humanist Anthony Cooke.
She was the mother of Francis Bacon.

Baron Verulam

Baron Verulam (1618)Lord Verulam
He was later created Baron Verulam in 1618 and Viscount St. Alban in 1621.
* Francis Bacon, 1st Baron Verulam (1561–1626) (became Viscount St Albans in 1621)

John Aubrey

AubreyMonumenta BritannicaAubrey's Brief Lives
Bacon died of pneumonia, with one account by John Aubrey stating that he had contracted the condition while studying the effects of freezing on the preservation of meat.
Aubrey read such books as came his way, including Bacon's Essays, and studied geometry in secret.

Gray's Inn

Grey's InnGray’s InnGray's Inn Square
On 27 June 1576, he and Anthony entered de societate magistrorum at Gray's Inn.
The inn was home to many important barristers and politicians, most notably Francis Bacon, and counted Queen Elizabeth herself as a patron.

John Whitgift

Archbishop WhitgiftWhitgiftDr John Whitgift
He went up to Trinity College at the University of Cambridge on 5 April 1573 at the age of 12, living for three years there, together with his older brother Anthony Bacon under the personal tutelage of Dr John Whitgift, future Archbishop of Canterbury.
Whitgift taught Francis Bacon and his elder brother Anthony Bacon at Cambridge University in the 1570s.

William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley

William CecilLord BurghleySir William Cecil
His mother's sister was married to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, making Burghley Bacon's uncle.
Three years later, on 21 December 1546 he married Mildred Cooke, who was ranked by Ascham with Lady Jane Grey as one of the two most learned ladies in the kingdom, (aside from another of Ascham's pupils, Elizabeth Tudor, who was later Elizabeth I) and whose sister, Anne, was the wife of Sir Nicholas Bacon, and later the mother of Sir Francis Bacon.

York House, Strand

York HouseNorwich PlaceYork Watergate
Francis Bacon was born on 22 January 1561 at York House near the Strand in London, the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon (Lord Keeper of the Great Seal) by his second wife, Anne (Cooke) Bacon, the daughter of the noted Renaissance humanist Anthony Cooke.
The Bishop of York was by tradition Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England and for about seventy years from 1558 it was leased to various secular holders of that high office, including Nicholas Bacon, Thomas Egerton and Francis Bacon.

Empiricism

empiricistempiricalempirically
Bacon has been called the father of empiricism.
Significantly, an empirical metaphysical system was developed by the Italian philosopher Bernardino Telesio which had an enormous impact on the development of later Italian thinkers, including Telesio's students Antonio Persio and Sertorio Quattromani, his contemporaries Thomas Campanella and Giordano Bruno, and later British philosophers such as Francis Bacon, who regarded Telesio as "the first of the moderns.” Telesio's influence can also be seen on the French philosophers René Descartes and Pierre Gassendi.

University of Poitiers

PoitiersUniversité de PoitiersPoitiers University
He was also educated at the University of Poitiers.
Of the 4,000 students who attended it at the time, some were to become famous: Joachim Du Bellay, Jean-Louis Guez de Balzac, François Rabelais, René Descartes, Francis Bacon and Scévole de Sainte-Marthe, to name but a few.

Amias Paulet

Sir Amias PauletAmyas PauletSir Amyas Paulet
A few months later, Francis went abroad with Sir Amias Paulet, the English ambassador at Paris, while Anthony continued his studies at home.
In 1576 Queen Elizabeth raised him to knighthood, appointed him Ambassador to Paris and at the same time put the young Francis Bacon under his charge.

Bossiney (UK Parliament constituency)

BossineyBossiney (seat 1/2)borough of Bossiney
His parliamentary career began when he was elected MP for Bossiney, Cornwall, in a by-election in 1581.

University of Cambridge

Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUniversity
He went up to Trinity College at the University of Cambridge on 5 April 1573 at the age of 12, living for three years there, together with his older brother Anthony Bacon under the personal tutelage of Dr John Whitgift, future Archbishop of Canterbury.
Others are Sir Francis Bacon, who was responsible for the development of the scientific method and the mathematicians John Dee and Brook Taylor.

Alice Barnham

AliceAlice Barnham, Viscountess of St. Alban
The following year, during the course of the uneventful first parliament session, Bacon married Alice Barnham.
Alice Barnham, Viscountess St Albans (14 May 1592 – 1650) was the wife of English scientific philosopher and statesman Francis Bacon.

Nature (philosophy)

naturephilosophy of naturenatural
His works argued for the possibility of scientific knowledge based only upon inductive reasoning and careful observation of events in nature.
In contrast, Modern Science took its distinctive turn with Francis Bacon, who rejected the four distinct causes, and saw Aristotle as someone who "did proceed in such a spirit of difference and contradiction towards all antiquity: undertaking not only to frame new words of science at pleasure, but to confound and extinguish all ancient wisdom".

James VI and I

James IJames VIJames I of England
The succession of James I brought Bacon into greater favour.
Under James, the "Golden Age" of Elizabethan literature and drama continued, with writers such as William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Sir Francis Bacon contributing to a flourishing literary culture.

Taunton (UK Parliament constituency)

TauntonTaunton (seat 1/2)borough of Taunton
In 1584 he took his seat in parliament for Melcombe in Dorset, and in 1586 for Taunton.

Solicitor General for England and Wales

Solicitor GeneralSolicitor-GeneralSolicitor-General for England and Wales
Likewise, Bacon failed to secure the lesser office of Solicitor General in 1595, the Queen pointedly snubbing him by appointing Sir Thomas Fleming instead.

Liverpool (UK Parliament constituency)

LiverpoolLiverpool (seat 1/2)Liverpool constituency
In 1588 he became MP for Liverpool and then for Middlesex in 1593.

Queen's Counsel

QCKing's CounselKC
Bacon was the first recipient of the Queen's counsel designation, which was conferred in 1597 when Elizabeth I of England reserved Bacon as her legal advisor.
The first Queen's Counsel Extraordinary was Sir Francis Bacon, who was given a patent giving him precedence at the Bar in 1597, and formally styled King's Counsel in 1603.

Novum Organum

Novum OrganonInstauratio magnaNovum Organum Scientiarum
Bacon's idea of idols of the mind may have self-consciously represented an attempt to Christianise science at the same time as developing a new, reliable scientific method; Bacon gave worship of Neptune as an example of the idola tribus fallacy, hinting at the religious dimensions of his critique of the idols.
The Novum Organum, fully Novum Organum, sive indicia vera de Interpretatione Naturae ("New organon, or true directions concerning the interpretation of nature"), is a philosophical work by Francis Bacon, written in Latin and published in 1620.