Francis Hopkinson

HopkinsonHopkinson, Francis
Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 – May 9, 1791) designed the first official American flag, Continental paper money, and the first U.S. coin.wikipedia
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Flag of the United States

American flagStars and StripesU.S. flag
Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 – May 9, 1791) designed the first official American flag, Continental paper money, and the first U.S. coin.
Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey, a naval flag designer, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, designed the 1777 flag while he was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board's Middle Department, sometime between his appointment to that position in November 1776 and the time that the flag resolution was adopted in June 1777.

New Jersey

NJState of New JerseyJersey
He was an author, a composer, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence in July 1776, as a delegate from New Jersey.
New Jersey representatives Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, and Abraham Clark were among those who signed the United States Declaration of Independence.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceindependenceAmerican Declaration of Independence
He was an author, a composer, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence in July 1776, as a delegate from New Jersey.

Bordentown, New Jersey

BordentownBordentown CityBordentown borough
He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became a member of the New Jersey Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775.
In addition to Joseph Borden's son (also named Joseph Borden), who became a colonel during the war, patriots Francis Hopkinson (a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence), Colonel Kirkbride, Colonel Oakey Hoagland and Thomas Paine resided in the area.

Thomas Hopkinson

Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson.
He enrolled his son Francis Hopkinson, later a signatory of the Declaration of Independence in the first classes at the Academy.

Christ Church Burial Ground

He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia.
Four other signers of the Declaration of Independence are buried here, Benjamin Rush, Francis Hopkinson, Joseph Hewes and George Ross.

Joseph Hopkinson

He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, who was a member of the United States House of Representatives and also became a federal judge.
Joseph Hopkinson (son of Francis Hopkinson) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Battle of the Kegs

Some of his more notable songs include "The Treaty", "The Battle of the Kegs", and "The New Roof, a song for Federal Mechanics".
The Battle of the Kegs is a propaganda ballad written by Francis Hopkinson describing an attempted attack upon the British Fleet in the harbor of Philadelphia on January 6, 1778 during the American Revolutionary War.

Symbols of the United States Department of the Treasury

treasury sealsealTreasury Seals
Others included the Treasury Board seal, "7 devices for the Continental Currency," and "the Flag of the United States of America."
The actual creator of the U.S. Treasury seal was Francis Hopkinson, who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and also contributed to the design of the Great Seal of the United States.

Great Seal of the United States

coat of arms of the United StatesGreat SealAmerican Eagle
He asked for a quarter cask of wine in payment for designing the U.S. flag, the Great Seal of the United States, and various other contributions.
Like the first committee, they sought the help of someone more experienced in heraldry, this time Francis Hopkinson, who did most of the work.

Francis Hopkinson House

* Francis Hopkinson House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Burlington County, New Jersey
The Francis Hopkinson House is an historic home in Bordentown, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States, where Francis Hopkinson and his wife Ann Borden lived from 1774 until his death in 1791.

Betsy Ross flag

first American flagStars and Stripes13-star American flag
This flag with its circle of 13 stars came into popular use as a flag commemorating the nation's birth.
Francis Hopkinson is often given credit for the Betsy Ross design, as well as other 13-star arrangements.

Betsy Ross

namesakeU.S. colonial-era woman
The legend of Betsy Ross as the designer of the first flag entered into American consciousness about the time of the 1876 centennial celebrations, owing to the efforts of her grandson, William Canby.
Scholars, however, accept the claim by Francis Hopkinson—a member of the Continental Congress who designed most of the elements of the Great Seal of the United States—that he created designs for the early American flag.

William Barton (heraldist)

William Barton
The reverse of the seal, designed by William Barton, contains an unfinished pyramid below a radiant eye.
This combined the influence of Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, who had included the Eye of Providence in his designs for the First Great Seal Committee, with that of Francis Hopkinson, who had consulted for the Second Great Seal Committee, and who had included a similar pyramid in his 1778 design for the Continental Currency.

Nova Constellatio

first U.S. coin
Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 – May 9, 1791) designed the first official American flag, Continental paper money, and the first U.S. coin.

Second Continental Congress

Continental CongressCongressSecond
He served in various roles in the early United States government including as a member of the Second Continental Congress and chairman of the Navy Board.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
He also later served as a federal district judge in Pennsylvania after the ratification of the Federal Constitution.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
He also later served as a federal district judge in Pennsylvania after the ratification of the Federal Constitution.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson.

Academy and College of Philadelphia

College of PhiladelphiaAcademy of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphia College
He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his master's degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.

University of Pennsylvania

PennPennsylvaniathe University of Pennsylvania
He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his master's degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.
These include George Clymer, Francis Hopkinson, Thomas McKean, Robert Morris, William Paca, George Ross, Benjamin Rush, James Wilson, Thomas Fitzsimons, Jared Ingersoll, Rufus King, Thomas Mifflin, Gouverneur Morris and Hugh Williamson.

Pennsylvania Provincial Council

Provincial CouncilGovernor's CouncilProvincial Council of Pennsylvania
He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes.

Lenape

DelawareLenni LenapeDelaware Indians
He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes.

Iroquois

Six NationsIroquois ConfederacyFive Nations
He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes.