Frank Furness

Furness & HewittFurnessFurness & EvansFurness, Evans & Co.Frank Furness &Frank Furness (''Furness, Evans & Company'')Frank Furness and SonsFurness and EvansFurness, Evans & CompanyFurness-Hewitt
Frank Heyling Furness (November 12, 1839 - June 27, 1912) was an American architect of the Victorian era.wikipedia
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Louis Sullivan

SullivanesqueLouis H. SullivanSullivan
He designed more than 600 buildings, most in the Philadelphia area, and is remembered for his diverse, muscular, often unordinarily scaled buildings, and for his influence on the Chicago architect Louis Sullivan.
After one year of study, he moved to Philadelphia and took a job with architect Frank Furness.

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine ArtsPennsylvania AcademyPennsylvania Academy of Fine Art
Among his most important surviving buildings are the University of Pennsylvania Library (now the Fisher Fine Arts Library), the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, all in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For his masterworks, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Provident Trust Company, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station, and the University of Pennsylvania Library (now renamed the Furness Building) ... Living in Philadelphia and teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, they often visited Furness's Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts — built for the 1876 Centennial — and his University of Pennsylvania Library.
They commissioned the current Furness-Hewitt building, which was constructed from 1871.

Fisher Fine Arts Library

University of Pennsylvania LibraryArthur Ross GalleryFurness Library
Among his most important surviving buildings are the University of Pennsylvania Library (now the Fisher Fine Arts Library), the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, all in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For his masterworks, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Provident Trust Company, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station, and the University of Pennsylvania Library (now renamed the Furness Building) ... Living in Philadelphia and teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, they often visited Furness's Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts — built for the 1876 Centennial — and his University of Pennsylvania Library.
Designed by the acclaimed Philadelphia architect Frank Furness (1839–1912), the red sandstone, brick-and-terra-cotta Venetian Gothic giant—part fortress and part cathedral—was built to be the primary library of the University, and to house its archeological collection.

Horace Howard Furness

Horace FurnessFurness, H.H.H. H. Furness
His father, William Henry Furness, was a prominent Unitarian minister and abolitionist, and his brother, Horace Howard Furness, became America's outstanding Shakespeare scholar.
Horace Furness was the son of the Unitarian minister and abolitionist William Henry Furness (1802–1896), and brother of the architect Frank Furness (1839–1912).

First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia

First Unitarian ChurchFirst UnitarianPhiladelphia
Among his most important surviving buildings are the University of Pennsylvania Library (now the Fisher Fine Arts Library), the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, all in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Frank Furness, the architect of The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and son of the Church's first minister, designed the current church building.

Allen Evans

In 1881, Furness promoted his chief draftsman, Allen Evans, to partner (Furness & Evans); and, in 1886, did the same for four other long-time employees.
He worked as a draftsman for architect Samuel Sloan, and was working for Furness & Hewitt by 1872.

Richard Morris Hunt

HuntRichard M. HuntRichard Hunt
He attended the École des Beaux-Arts-inspired atelier of Richard Morris Hunt in New York from 1859 to 1861, and again in 1865, following his military service.
Hunt's first substantial project was the Tenth Street Studio Building, where he rented a space, and where in 1858 he founded the first American architectural school, beginning with a small group of students, including George B. Post, William Robert Ware, Henry Van Brunt and Frank Furness.

Congregation Rodeph Shalom (Philadelphia)

Congregation Rodeph ShalomRodeph Shalom SynagogueCongregation Rodeph Shalom (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
The trio lasted less than five years, and its major commissions were Rodef Shalom Synagogue (1868–69, demolished) and the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion (1870–75, demolished).
Relatively late in its history, then, the congregation finally built its first building in 1866, a Moorish Revival sanctuary on North Broad Street designed by Philadelphia architect Frank Furness.

G. W. & W. D. Hewitt

George HewittG.W. & W.D. HewittGeorge W. and William D. Hewitt
Hewitt and his brother William formed their own firm, G.W. & W.D. Hewitt, and became Furness's biggest competitor.
In 1867, he formed a partnership with John Fraser and Frank Furness, which lasted until 1871.

John Fraser (architect)

John Fraser
He began his architectural training in the office of John Fraser, Philadelphia, in the 1850s.
His career is overshadowed by that of his former student and one-time partner, Frank Furness (Fraser, Furness & Hewitt: 1867-71), whose influence is visible in Fraser's Washington, D.C. mansions for James G. Blaine and John T. Brodhead.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad station (Philadelphia)

24th Street StationPhiladelphia, Pa.24th Street B&O Station
His 40 stations for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad included the ingenious 24th Street Station (demolished 1963) beside the Chestnut Street Bridge. For his masterworks, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Provident Trust Company, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station, and the University of Pennsylvania Library (now renamed the Furness Building) ...
Designed by architect Frank Furness in 1886, it stood at 24th Street and the Chestnut Street Bridge from 1888 to 1963.

Daniel Pabst

Furness designed custom interiors and furniture in collaboration with Philadelphia cabinetmaker Daniel Pabst.
Sometimes working in collaboration with architect Frank Furness (1839–1912), he made pieces in the Renaissance Revival, Neo-Grec, Modern Gothic, and Colonial Revival styles.

Idlewild (Media, Pennsylvania)

Idlewild
He died on June 27, 1912, at "Idlewild," his summer house outside Media, and is buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.
Idlewild is a historic building near Media, Pennsylvania, designed by the Victorian-era Philadelphia architect Frank Furness as a summer cottage for his family.

Provident Life & Trust Company

Furness's bank buildings of the late-1870sProvident Life and Accident Insurance CoProvident Trust Company
For his masterworks, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Provident Trust Company, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station, and the University of Pennsylvania Library (now renamed the Furness Building) ...
The Provident Life & Trust Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a demolished Victorian-era building by architect Frank Furness, is considered to have been one of his greatest works.

Broad Street Station (Philadelphia)

Broad Street StationBroad Street, PhiladelphiaPhiladelphia Broad Street Station
For the Pennsylvania Railroad, he designed more than 20 structures, including the great Broad Street Station (demolished 1953) at Broad and Market Streets in Philadelphia.
Broad Street Station was dramatically expanded by renowned Philadelphia architect Frank Furness, 1892-93.

Centennial National Bank

Designed by noted Philadelphia architect Frank Furness and significant in his artistic development, it was built in 1876 as the headquarters of the eponymous bank that would be the fiscal agent of the Centennial Exposition.

Laurel Hill Cemetery

Laurel Hill garden cemeteryNorth Laurel Hill Cemetery
He died on June 27, 1912, at "Idlewild," his summer house outside Media, and is buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.

University of Pennsylvania

PennThe University of PennsylvaniaPennsylvania
Living in Philadelphia and teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, they often visited Furness's Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts — built for the 1876 Centennial — and his University of Pennsylvania Library.
Penn's libraries, with associated school or subject area: Annenberg (School of Communications), located in the Annenberg School; Biddle (Law), located in the Law School; Biomedical, located adjacent to the Robert Wood Johnson Pavilion of the Medical School; Chemistry, located in the 1973 Wing of the Chemistry Building; Dental Medicine; Engineering, located on the second floor of the Towne Building in the Engineering School; Fine Arts, located within the Fisher Fine Arts Library, designed by Frank Furness; Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, located at 420 Walnut Street, near Independence Hall and Washington Square; Lea Library, located within the Van Pelt Library; Lippincott (Wharton School), located on the second floor of the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center; Math/Physics/Astronomy, located on the third floor of David Rittenhouse Laboratory; Museum (Archaeology); Rare Books and Manuscripts; Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center (Humanities and Social Sciences) – location of Weigle Information Commons; Veterinary Medicine, located in Penn Campus and New Bolton Center; and High Density Storage.

Thomas Hockley House

The Thomas Hockley House (1875) is a Victorian city house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, designed by architect Frank Furness.

Robert Venturi

Venturi, Scott Brown and AssociatesVenturiVenturi Scott Brown
Architect and critic Robert Venturi in Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (1966) wrote, not unadmiringly, of the National Bank of the Republic (later the Philadelphia Clearing House):
Citing vernacular as well as high-style sources, Venturi drew new lessons from the buildings of architects familiar (Michelangelo, Alvar Aalto) and then-forgotten (Frank Furness, Edwin Lutyens).

Horace Jayne House

city house at 19th & Delancey StreetsJaynes' Philadelphia city house
Horace Jayne House (1895) is an architecturally significant building designed by architect Frank Furness in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

James F. O'Gorman

In 1973, the Philadelphia Museum of Art mounted the first retrospective of Furness's work, curated by James F. O'Gorman, George E. Thomas and Hyman Myers.
O'Gorman is particularly known for his research and writing on the nineteenth-century American architects Henry Hobson Richardson, Frank Furness, Hammatt Billings, Isaiah Rogers, and Gervase Wheeler.

Mount Airy station

Mount AiryMount Airy (SEPTA station)
The station building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was built in 1875 with Frank Furness as the likely architect, according to the Philadelphia Architects and Buildings project.

William Henry Furness

Furness
His father, William Henry Furness, was a prominent Unitarian minister and abolitionist, and his brother, Horace Howard Furness, became America's outstanding Shakespeare scholar.
They had four children: William Henry Furness, Jr., a portrait painter; Horace Howard Furness, a Shakespeare scholar; Frank Furness, one of Philadelphia's most prominent architects; and Annis Lee Furness Wister, an author and translator.

Church of St. Luke and The Epiphany (Philadelphia)

Church of St. Luke and The EpiphanyChurch of St. Luke & the EpiphanyAddison Alvord Ewing
He commissioned Furness & Hewitt to construct a parish house with a chapel for additional capacity.