Franklin Court

Franklin Court and Benjamin Franklin Museum
Franklin Court is complex of museums, structures, and historic sites within Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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Independence National Historical Park

Independence MallIndependence Mall EastIndependence Hall area
Franklin Court is complex of museums, structures, and historic sites within Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
The park also contains Franklin Court, the site of a museum dedicated to Benjamin Franklin and the United States Postal Service Museum.

Robert Venturi

Venturi, Scott Brown and AssociatesVenturiVenturi Scott Brown
The complex was designed by the firm of Venturi and Rauch, and opened in 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial celebration.

Ben Franklin House

Benjamin Franklin HotelThe Benjamin Franklin
For Benjamin Franklin's residence site in Philadelphia, see Franklin Court.

Benjamin Franklin Bache (journalist)

Benjamin Franklin BacheBenjamin BacheBenjamin F. Bache
In 1787, Franklin built a print shop within the lot for his grandson Benjamin Franklin Bache, who would publish the Philadelphia Aurora there.
Upon returning to Philadelphia, Bache began working as a printer at his grandfather's shop at the family's Franklin Court property on Market Street, presaging his future career as a newspaper editor.

Denise Scott Brown

Scott BrownDenise Scott-BrownScott-Brown
Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (who also worked for the firm at the time) expressed disapproval of the plan, insofar as it negatively altered the 1974 design considerations and failing to recognize those considerations.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Franklin Court is complex of museums, structures, and historic sites within Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
It is located at the site which American Patriot Benjamin Franklin had his Philadelphia residence from 1763 to his death in 1790.

United States Bicentennial

BicentennialAmerican BicentennialU.S. Bicentennial
The complex was designed by the firm of Venturi and Rauch, and opened in 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial celebration.

Market Street (Philadelphia)

Market StreetMarket EastMarket Streets
The site consists of the archaeological remnants of the Benjamin Franklin's house and nearby buildings, "ghost" reconstruction of the form of the house and print shop, an underground museum focused on Franklin, and historic structures facing Market Street, including what are now a working post-office and printing-shop.

Second Continental Congress

Continental CongressCongressSecond
Though Franklin was overseas during a significant portion of that time, he was in Philadelphia during much of his tenure and involvement with both the Second Continental Congress and the United States Constitutional Convention.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
Though Franklin was overseas during a significant portion of that time, he was in Philadelphia during much of his tenure and involvement with both the Second Continental Congress and the United States Constitutional Convention.

Philadelphia Aurora

AuroraBache's Philadelphia AuroraGeneral Advertiser
In 1787, Franklin built a print shop within the lot for his grandson Benjamin Franklin Bache, who would publish the Philadelphia Aurora there.

Reconstruction (architecture)

reconstructionreconstructedrebuilt
The design resulted from inadequate historical information to properly reconstruct the structures, couple with emerging philosophical views at the time towards reconstruction of structures.

List of tourist attractions in Philadelphia

List of sites of interest in PhiladelphiaList of sites of interest in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

History of American newspapers

journalistFederalist and Republican newspapersnewspapers
The Aurora, published from Franklin Court in Philadelphia, was the most strident newspaper of its time, attacking John Adams' anti-democratic policies on a daily basis.

Ralph Archbold

He gave frequent speeches for company meetings, and was regularly seen sitting on a park bench in Franklin Court.