Frantz Fanon

FanonFranz FanonFanon, FrantzcolonizedFanonianFanonistFrantz Fanon (1925–1961)Frantz Omar FanonFranz Fannon
Frantz Fanon (, ; 20 July 1925 – 6 December 1961), also known as Ibrahim Frantz Fanon, was a French West Indian psychiatrist, political philosopher, revolutionary, and writer from the French colony of Martinique, whose works are influential in the fields of post-colonial studies, critical theory and Marxism.wikipedia
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The Wretched of the Earth

Wretched of the EarthConcerning Violence
Fanon published numerous books, including The Wretched of the Earth (1961).
The Wretched of the Earth (Les Damnés de la Terre) is a 1961 book by Frantz Fanon, in which the author provides a psychiatric and psychologic analysis of the dehumanizing effects of colonization upon the individual and the nation, and discusses the broader social, cultural, and political implications inherent to establishing a social movement for the decolonization of a person and of a people.

Lewis Gordon

Lewis R. Gordon
In What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought, Lewis R. Gordon remarked that
He has written particularly extensively on race and racism, postcolonial phenomenology, Africana and black existentialism, and on the works and thought of W. E. B. Du Bois and Frantz Fanon.

Marxist humanism

Marxist humanistMarxist humanistshumanistic Marxism
As well as being an intellectual, Fanon was a political radical, Pan-Africanist, and Marxist humanist concerned with the psychopathology of colonization and the human, social, and cultural consequences of decolonization.

Pan-Africanism

Pan-AfricanPan-AfricanistPan African
As well as being an intellectual, Fanon was a political radical, Pan-Africanist, and Marxist humanist concerned with the psychopathology of colonization and the human, social, and cultural consequences of decolonization.
Frantz Fanon, journalist, freedom fighter and a member of the Algerian FLN party attended the conference as a delegate for Algeria.

Aimé Césaire

Aime CesaireAimé CesaireCésaire
They could afford the fees for the Lycée Schoelcher, at the time the most prestigious high school in Martinique, where Fanon came to admire one of the school's teachers, poet and writer Aimé Césaire.
Césaire became a teacher at the Lycée Schoelcher in Fort-de-France, where he taught Frantz Fanon, becoming a great influence for Fanon as both a mentor and contemporary.

Afro-Caribbean

African-CaribbeanAfro-CaribbeansAfrican Caribbean
Fanon and his fellow Afro-Caribbean soldiers were sent to Toulon (Provence).
Both the home and diaspora populations have produced a number of individuals who have had a notable influence on modern Western, Caribbean, and African societies; they include political activists such as Marcus Garvey and C. L. R. James; writers and theorists such as Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon; US military leader and statesman Colin Powell; and musicians Bob Marley and Rihanna.

Black Skin, White Masks

Black Skin White MasksBlack Skin, White Masks.Peau noire, masques blancs
In France while completing his residency, Fanon wrote and published his first book, Black Skin, White Masks (1952), an analysis of the negative psychological effects of colonial subjugation upon black people.
Black Skin, White Masks (Peau noire, masques blancs) is a 1952 book by Frantz Fanon, a psychiatrist and intellectual from Martinique.

Institutional psychotherapy

He also helped found the field of institutional psychotherapy while working at Saint-Alban under Francois Tosquelles and Jean Oury.
Those associated with the approach include François Tosquelles, Jean Oury, Felix Guattari, Frantz Fanon, and Georges Canguilhem.

Toward the African Revolution

Many of his shorter writings from this period were collected posthumously in the book Toward the African Revolution.
Toward the African Revolution (French: Pour la Revolution Africaine) is a collection of essays written by Frantz Fanon, which was published in 1964, after Fanon's death.

Martinique

MartiniquaisMartinicanMartiniquan
Frantz Fanon (, ; 20 July 1925 – 6 December 1961), also known as Ibrahim Frantz Fanon, was a French West Indian psychiatrist, political philosopher, revolutionary, and writer from the French colony of Martinique, whose works are influential in the fields of post-colonial studies, critical theory and Marxism.
Frantz Fanon, a prominent critic of colonialism and racism, was also from Martinique; his best known works are Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth.

Algerian War

Algerian War of IndependenceAlgeriaAlgerian revolution
In the course of his work as a physician and psychiatrist, Fanon supported the Algerian War of Independence from France and was a member of the Algerian National Liberation Front. Following the outbreak of the Algerian revolution in November 1954, Fanon joined the Front de Libération Nationale, after having made contact with Dr Pierre Chaulet at Blida in 1955.
Frantz Fanon, a psychiatrist from Martinique who became the FLN's leading political theorist, provided a sophisticated intellectual justification for the use of violence in achieving national liberation.

Éditions du Seuil

SeuilLe SeuilEditions du Seuil
Jeanson was a senior book editor at Éditions du Seuil, in Paris.
Notably, they published Frantz Fanon's doctoral thesis, Black Skin, White Masks, in 1952, and the first edition of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago (in Russian as Архипелаг ГУЛАГ) in 1973.

Steve Biko

Stephen BikoSteven BikoBiko
In particular, Les damnés de la terre was a major influence on the work of revolutionary leaders such as Ali Shariati in Iran, Steve Biko in South Africa, Malcolm X in the United States and Ernesto Che Guevara in Cuba.
Influenced by the Martinican philosopher Frantz Fanon and the African-American Black Power movement, Biko and his compatriots developed Black Consciousness as SASO's official ideology.

A Dying Colonialism

L'An Cinq: De la Révolution Algérienne
It was during this time that he produced works such as L'An Cinq, de la Révolution Algérienne in 1959 (Year Five of the Algerian Revolution, later republished as Sociology of a Revolution and later still as A Dying Colonialism).
A Dying Colonialism (L'An V de la Révolution Algérienne) is a 1959 book by Frantz Fanon, in which Fanon provides an account of the Algerian War.

Négritude

NegritudeBlacknessnegritud
Fanon was influenced by a variety of thinkers and intellectual traditions including Jean-Paul Sartre, Lacan, Négritude, and Marxism.
Frantz Fanon often made reference to Négritude in his writing.

Ali Shariati

ShariatiAli Shari'atiDr. Ali Shariati
In particular, Les damnés de la terre was a major influence on the work of revolutionary leaders such as Ali Shariati in Iran, Steve Biko in South Africa, Malcolm X in the United States and Ernesto Che Guevara in Cuba.
The following year, he began to read Frantz Fanon and translated an anthology of his work into Persian.

Jean-Paul Sartre

SartreJean Paul SartreJean-Paul Satre
Fanon was influenced by a variety of thinkers and intellectual traditions including Jean-Paul Sartre, Lacan, Négritude, and Marxism. He made a final visit to Sartre in Rome.
In the late 1950s, Sartre began to argue that the European working classes were too apolitical to carry out the revolution predicated by Marx, and influenced by Frantz Fanon stated to argue it was the impoverished masses of the Third World, the "real damned of the earth", who would carry out the revolution.

El Moudjahid

El Moudjahid - المجاهد
He was part of the editorial collective of El Moudjahid, for which he wrote until the end of his life.
Noted writer, activist and psychiatrist Frantz Fanon wrote for the newspaper during his life.

Pierre Chaulet

Following the outbreak of the Algerian revolution in November 1954, Fanon joined the Front de Libération Nationale, after having made contact with Dr Pierre Chaulet at Blida in 1955.
It was Chaulet who introduced Frantz Fanon to the FLN, at Blida in 1955.

François Maspero

MasperoFrançois MaspéroÉditions Maspero
Fanon's original title was "Reality of a Nation"; however, the publisher, François Maspero, refused to accept this title.
Maspero published Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth (1961), censored by the French authorities, with a preface by Jean-Paul Sartre, as well as Fanon's L'An V de la Révolution algérienne.

Black Consciousness Movement

Black ConsciousnessBlack Consciousness Movement of AzaniaPretoria Twelve
Of these only Guevara was primarily concerned with Fanon's theories on violence; for Shariati, Biko and also Guevara the main interest in Fanon was "the new man" and "black consciousness" respectively.
Biko's understanding of these thinkers was further shaped through the lens of postcolonial thinkers such as Frantz Fanon, Léopold Senghor, and Aimé Césaire.

Lumpenproletariat

lumpenlumpen proletariatlower classes
His work was a key influence on the Black Panther Party, particularly his ideas concerning nationalism, violence and the lumpenproletariat.
The term was popularized in the West by Frantz Fanon in the 1960s and has been adopted as a sociological term.

François Tosquelles

Francois Tosquelles
He also helped found the field of institutional psychotherapy while working at Saint-Alban under Francois Tosquelles and Jean Oury.
The Martinican doctor and later revolutionary activist Frantz Fanon was one of his students, who then used his techniques to some degree of success while living in Blida, Algeria, in the mid-1950s.

Pontorson

MoidreyPontorson-Mont-Saint-Michel
After his residency, Fanon practised psychiatry at Pontorson, near Mont Saint-Michel, for another year and then (from 1953) in Algeria.
Frantz Fanon practiced psychiatry at Pontorson in the early 1950s.

Algeria

AlgerianPeople's Democratic Republic of AlgeriaAlgérie
After his residency, Fanon practised psychiatry at Pontorson, near Mont Saint-Michel, for another year and then (from 1953) in Algeria. He was later transferred to an army base at Béjaïa on the Kabylie coast of Algeria.
Malek Bennabi and Frantz Fanon are noted for their thoughts on decolonization; Augustine of Hippo was born in Tagaste (modern-day Souk Ahras); and Ibn Khaldun, though born in Tunis, wrote the Muqaddima while staying in Algeria.