Franz Sigel

Franz Sigel
Riverside Drive, New York City
Portrait from Appleton's Cyclopedia

German American military officer, revolutionary and immigrant to the United States who was a teacher, newspaperman, politician, and served as a Union major general in the American Civil War.

- Franz Sigel
Franz Sigel

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Historical buildings in the principal street

Sinsheim

Town in south-western Germany, in the Rhine Neckar Area of the state Baden-Württemberg about 22 km south-east of Heidelberg and about 28 km north-west of Heilbronn in the district Rhein-Neckar.

Town in south-western Germany, in the Rhine Neckar Area of the state Baden-Württemberg about 22 km south-east of Heidelberg and about 28 km north-west of Heilbronn in the district Rhein-Neckar.

Historical buildings in the principal street
Burg Steinsberg
The monastery Stift Sunnisheim
The Sinsheim Auto & Technik Museum as seen from the Bundesautobahn 6
The Rhein-Neckar-Arena

Sinsheim-born revolutionary Franz Sigel became a famous Union general in the American Civil War.

The  Battle of Wilson's Creek  by Kurz & Allison

Battle of Wilson's Creek

The first major battle of the Trans-Mississippi Theater of the American Civil War.

The first major battle of the Trans-Mississippi Theater of the American Civil War.

The  Battle of Wilson's Creek  by Kurz & Allison
The battle as depicted on a mural in the Missouri State Capitol
Battle of Wilson's Creek (August 10, 1861)
The Ray House at the eastern end of Wilson's Creek National Battlefield
<center>Brig. Gen.
<center>Col. Franz Sigel, USA</center>
<center>Maj. Samuel D. Sturgis, USA</center>
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen.

On August 10, Lyon, in two columns commanded by himself and Col. Franz Sigel, attacked the Confederates on Wilson's Creek about 10 mi southwest of Springfield.

The Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark. by Kurz & Allison

Battle of Pea Ridge

The Battle of Pea Ridge (March 7–8, 1862), also known as the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern, took place in the American Civil War near Leetown, northeast of Fayetteville, Arkansas.

The Battle of Pea Ridge (March 7–8, 1862), also known as the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern, took place in the American Civil War near Leetown, northeast of Fayetteville, Arkansas.

The Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark. by Kurz & Allison
Plan of the Battlefield of Pea Ridge
Battle of Pea Ridge (Day 1 and Day 2)
Troop arrangement at the Battle of Leetown
Lee Town fight
Confederate position overlooking Pea Ridge battleground.
Pea Ridge National Military Park
Troop deployment at Elkhorn Tavern
The last hour of the battle
Curtis's headquarters at Pratt's Store
<center>Brig. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen.
<center>Brig. Gen.

Over half of the Union soldiers were German immigrants, grouped into the 1st and 2nd Divisions, which were under the command of Brig. Gen. Franz Sigel, a German immigrant who had expected to command the army forces into Arkansas.

Gen. Pope's headquarters during the battle of Cedar Mountain

Army of Virginia

Organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War.

Organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War.

Gen. Pope's headquarters during the battle of Cedar Mountain

I Corps, Army of Virginia; commanded by Franz Sigel (this corps had been the Mountain Department under John Frémont; it eventually became the XI Corps, Army of the Potomac)

Shenandoah Valley operations, May&ndash;July 1864

Valley campaigns of 1864

The Valley campaigns of 1864 began as operations initiated by Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and resulting battles that took place in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia during the American Civil War from May to October 1864.

The Valley campaigns of 1864 began as operations initiated by Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and resulting battles that took place in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia during the American Civil War from May to October 1864.

Shenandoah Valley operations, May&ndash;July 1864
The ruins of the Virginia Military Institute after Hunter's Raid in 1864.
Shenandoah Valley operations, August&ndash;October 1864
Sheridan's final charge at Winchester

Grant devised a coordinated strategy that would strike at the heart of the Confederacy from multiple directions: he would join with Meade and Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler to fight against Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia near Richmond; Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel would invade the Shenandoah Valley and destroy Lee's supply lines; Maj. Gen. Sherman would attack Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee, invade Georgia and capture Atlanta; and finally Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks was assigned to capture Mobile, Alabama, an important port on the Gulf Coast.

Origin of the Flag of Germany: Cheering revolutionaries in Berlin, on March 19, 1848

German revolutions of 1848–1849

Also called the March Revolution (Märzrevolution), were initially part of the Revolutions of 1848 that broke out in many European countries.

Also called the March Revolution (Märzrevolution), were initially part of the Revolutions of 1848 that broke out in many European countries.

Origin of the Flag of Germany: Cheering revolutionaries in Berlin, on March 19, 1848
The painting Germania, possibly by Philipp Veit, hung inside the Frankfurt parliament, the first national parliament in German history
Vienna Uprising, October 1848
The Battle of Kirchheimbolanden, 14 June 1849
Ludwigshafen burns, 15 June 1849
Barricades at Alexander Platz, Berlin
Alfred von Waldersee gave an account of the events of March 1848 in Berlin as seen by the soldiers
The dead are laid out on the Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin
The May uprising in Dresden
Arbeiterdelegation 1848 vor dem Magistrat by Johann Peter Hasenclever
National assembly's meeting in St. Paul's Church
Archduke Johann's proclamation to the German people upon appointment as Administrator of the Realm

Other noteworthy military officers serving the provisional government in the city of Kaiserlautern, were Friedrich Strasser, Alexander Schimmelpfennig, Captain Rudolph von Manteuffel, Albert Clement, Herr Zychlinski, Friedrich von Beust, Eugen Oswald, Amand Goegg, Gustav von Struve, Otto Julius Bernhard von Corvin-Wiersbitzki, Joseph Moll, Johann Gottfried Kinkel, Herr Mersy, Karl Emmermann, Franz Sigel, Major Nerlinger, Colonel Kurz, Friedrich Karl Franz Hecker and Hermann von Natzmer.

XI Corps badge

XI Corps (Union Army)

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War, best remembered for its involvement in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863.

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War, best remembered for its involvement in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863.

XI Corps badge

Major General Franz Sigel thus assumed command of the corps on June 29.

Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, during the Civil War

Oliver Otis Howard

Career United States Army officer and a Union general in the Civil War.

Career United States Army officer and a Union general in the Civil War.

Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, during the Civil War
Monument to Howard in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Howard in 1893 at Governor's Island
The General Oliver Otis Howard House, located on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C., was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974.
Howard ca. 1908

He was promoted to major general in November 1862 and assumed command of the XI Corps the following April, replacing Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel.

Samuel R. Curtis in 1862

Samuel Ryan Curtis

American military officer and one of the first Republicans elected to Congress.

American military officer and one of the first Republicans elected to Congress.

Samuel R. Curtis in 1862
Equestrian statue on the Keokuk riverfront

The Army originally consisted of three divisions, the 1st commanded by Brig. Gen. Franz Sigel, the 2nd by Brig. Gen. Alexander Asboth, and the 3rd by Col. Jefferson C. Davis.

Carl Schurz in 1860. A participant of the 1848 revolution in Germany, he immigrated to the United States and became the 13th United States Secretary of the Interior

Forty-Eighters

The Forty-Eighters were Europeans who participated in or supported the revolutions of 1848 that swept Europe.

The Forty-Eighters were Europeans who participated in or supported the revolutions of 1848 that swept Europe.

Carl Schurz in 1860. A participant of the 1848 revolution in Germany, he immigrated to the United States and became the 13th United States Secretary of the Interior
St. Louis Turnverein, 1860

Soldiers in the American Civil War: Louis Blenker; Alexander Schimmelpfennig; Carl Schurz; Franz Sigel; Max Weber; August Willich; Peter Joseph Osterhaus; Frederick Salomon; Adolph von Steinwehr; Joseph Weydemeyer; Gustav Struve