Fred Astaire

FredAstaireFred and Adele AstaireAstaire Awards Fred Astaire Astaire Award for Outstanding Male DancerAstaire, FredF. AstaireFred & Adele Astaire AwardFred and Adele Astaire, with Julian Jones & His Orchestra
Fred Astaire (born Frederick Austerlitz; May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) was an American dancer, singer, actor, choreographer, and television presenter.wikipedia
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Ginger Rogers

RogersGingeractress of the same name
His most memorable dancing partnership was with Ginger Rogers, with whom he co-starred in a series of ten Hollywood musicals.
She is known for her starring role in Kitty Foyle (1940), but is best remembered for performing in RKO's musical films (partnered with Fred Astaire) on stage, radio and television, throughout much of the 20th century.

Musical film

musicalmusical comedy filmmusicals
He starred in more than 10 Broadway and London musicals, made 31 musical films, four television specials, and issued numerous recordings. The partnership, and the choreography of Astaire and Hermes Pan, helped make dancing an important element of the Hollywood film musical.
Musical stars such as Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were among the most popular and highly respected personalities in Hollywood during the classical era; the Fred and Ginger pairing was particularly successful, resulting in a number of classic films, such as Top Hat (1935), Swing Time (1936), and Shall We Dance (1937).

Adele Astaire

AdeleAdèle AstaireLady Charles Cavendish
Astaire's mother dreamed of escaping Omaha by her children's talents, after Astaire's sister, Adele Astaire, revealed herself to be an instinctive dancer and singer very early on in her childhood.
After beginning work as a dancer and vaudeville performer at the age of nine, Astaire built a successful performance career with her younger brother, Fred Astaire.

Bill Robinson

Bill "Bojangles" RobinsonBill 'Bojangles' RobinsonBill Bojangles Robinson
Astaire's dancing was inspired by Bill "Bojangles" Robinson and John "Bubbles" Sublett.
Robinson is remembered for the support that he gave to fellow performers, including Fred Astaire, Lena Horne, Jesse Owens and the Nicholas Brothers.

Bob Fosse

FosseFosse-like
Beyond film and television, many dancers and choreographers, including Rudolf Nureyev, Sammy Davis Jr., Michael Jackson, Gregory Hines, Mikhail Baryshnikov, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Madhuri Dixit, and Bob Fosse, who called Astaire his "idol", also acknowledged his influence.
After the war, Fosse moved to New York City with the ambition of being the new Fred Astaire.

RKO Pictures

RKO Radio PicturesRKORKO Studios
According to Hollywood folklore, a screen test report on Astaire for RKO Radio Pictures, now lost along with the test, is reported to have read: "Can't sing. Can't act. Balding. Can dance a little."
RKO has long been renowned for its cycle of musicals starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in the mid-to-late 1930s.

The Gay Divorcee

filmGai Divorce'' (''The Gay Divorcee'')The Gay Divorcée
Fred went on to achieve success on his own on Broadway and in London with Gay Divorce (later made into the film The Gay Divorcee) while considering offers from Hollywood. These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
The Gay Divorcee is a 1934 American musical film directed by Mark Sandrich and starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars

greatest female starsgreatest male stars100 Years...100 Stars
The American Film Institute named Astaire the fifth greatest male star of Classic Hollywood cinema in 100 Years... 100 Stars.

Gene Kelly

Eugene Curran KellyKellyKelly, Gene
Gene Kelly, another renowned star of filmed dance, said that "the history of dance on film begins with Astaire."
In Ziegfeld Follies (1946)—which was produced in 1944 but delayed for release—Kelly collaborated with Fred Astaire, for whom he had the greatest admiration, in "The Babbitt and the Bromide" challenge dance routine.

Night and Day (song)

Night and DayNight & DayNight and Day" (song)
Free of the brother-sister constraints of the former pairing and working with new partner Claire Luce, Fred created a romantic partnered dance to Cole Porter's "Night and Day," which had been written for Gay Divorce.
Fred Astaire introduced "Night and Day" on stage.

Hermes Pan

Hermes Pan Dancers
The partnership, and the choreography of Astaire and Hermes Pan, helped make dancing an important element of the Hollywood film musical.
Hermes Pan (born Hermes Joseph Panagiotopoulos, December 10, 1909 – September 19, 1990) was an American dancer and choreographer, principally remembered as Fred Astaire's choreographic collaborator on the famous 1930s movie musicals starring Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

Gay Divorce

The Gay Divorce
Fred went on to achieve success on his own on Broadway and in London with Gay Divorce (later made into the film The Gay Divorcee) while considering offers from Hollywood.
It was Fred Astaire's last Broadway show and featured the hit song "Night and Day" in which Astaire danced with co-star Claire Luce.

Shall We Dance (1937 film)

Shall We DanceShall We Dance?1937
These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Shall We Dance, released in 1937, is the seventh of the ten Astaire-Rogers musical comedy films.

Top Hat

1935 film of the same namefilm
These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Top Hat is a 1935 American screwball musical comedy film in which Fred Astaire plays an American dancer named Jerry Travers, who comes to London to star in a show produced by Horace Hardwick (Edward Everett Horton).

Follow the Fleet

These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Follow the Fleet is a 1936 American RKO musical comedy film with a nautical theme starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in their fifth collaboration as dance partners.

Keyport, New Jersey

KeyportKeyport BoroughKeyport, NJ
In November 1905 the goofy act debuted in Keyport, New Jersey, in a "tryout theater."
It was the site of the professional dance debut of film star Fred Astaire in 1903 at age four, together with his sister Adele, as part of an act that earned a review that called the duo "the greatest child act in vaudeville.

Flying Down to Rio

On his return to RKO, he got fifth billing after fourth billed Ginger Rogers in the 1933 Dolores del Río vehicle Flying Down to Rio.
Flying Down to Rio is a 1933 American pre-Code RKO musical film noted for being the first screen pairing of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, although Dolores del Río and Gene Raymond received top billing and the leading roles.

Finian's Rainbow (1968 film)

Finian's RainbowFinian’s Rainbowa film in 1968
Astaire maintained this policy from The Gay Divorcee in 1934 until his last film musical Finian's Rainbow in 1968, when director Francis Ford Coppola overruled him.
Finian's Rainbow is a 1968 Irish-American musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Fred Astaire and Petula Clark.

Swing Time (film)

Swing TimeBojangles of HarlemSwing Time (1936 film)
These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Swing Time is a 1936 American RKO musical comedy film set mainly in New York City, and starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

Carefree (film)

CarefreeCarefree'' (film)
These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Carefree is a 1938 musical film starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

Roberta (1935 film)

Roberta1935 filmLovely to Look At
These included The Gay Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935, in which Astaire also demonstrates his oft-overlooked piano skills with a spirited solo on "I Won't Dance"), Top Hat (1935), Follow the Fleet (1936), Swing Time (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), and Carefree (1938).
Roberta is a 1935 musical film by RKO starring Irene Dunne, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, and Randolph Scott.

Stanley Donen

Donen
Dance commentators Arlene Croce, Hannah Hyam and John Mueller consider Rogers to have been Astaire's greatest dance partner, a view shared by Hermes Pan and Stanley Donen.
Donen stated that what he was doing was a "direct continuation from the Astaire – Rogers musicals ... which in turn came from René Clair and from Lubitsch ... What we did was not geared towards realism but towards the unreal."

Dancing Lady

They lent him for a few days to MGM in 1933 for his significant Hollywood debut in the successful musical film Dancing Lady.
Dancing Lady is a 1933 American pre-Code musical film starring Joan Crawford and Clark Gable, and featuring Franchot Tone, Fred Astaire, Robert Benchley, and Ted Healy and His Stooges (who later became the Three Stooges with Curly, Moe and Larry).

Lady, Be Good (musical)

Lady, Be GoodLady Be GoodLady, Be Good!
They won popular acclaim with the theater crowd on both sides of the Atlantic in shows such as Jerome Kern's The Bunch and Judy (1922), George and Ira Gershwin's Lady, Be Good (1924), and Funny Face (1927) and later in The Band Wagon (1931).
It starred brother and sister performers Fred and Adele Astaire.

Claire Luce

Free of the brother-sister constraints of the former pairing and working with new partner Claire Luce, Fred created a romantic partnered dance to Cole Porter's "Night and Day," which had been written for Gay Divorce.
Luce starred in many Broadway plays from 1923 until 1952, including costarring with Fred Astaire in the original musical Gay Divorce (1932).