Fred LaBour

Fred "'''Too Slim'''" LaBourFred "Too Slim" LaBourFred (Too Slim) LaBour
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.wikipedia
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Riders in the Sky (band)

Riders in the SkyDoug Greenformer member of the band Riders in the Sky
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.
For this first performance, the Riders consisted of Deputy Doug (Douglas B. Green), Windy Bill Collins, and Fred LaBour.

George "Gabby" Hayes

George 'Gabby' HayesGabby HayesGeorge Hayes
LaBour is the central core of the Rider's comedy, with bits that include impressions of Gabby Hayes, carrying on conversations with a cow's skull, rolling tumbleweeds across the stage, and peddling a necktie in the form of a cactus, that he calls a cac-tie.
Hayes has also been portrayed in impressions by Fred LaBour (Too Slim), during Riders in the Sky performances.

Paul is dead

A notable conspiracy theorya rumour surfaceddied in 1966
LaBour was instrumental in the spread of the Paul is Dead urban legend.
Two days later, The Michigan Daily published a satirical review of Abbey Road by University of Michigan student Fred LaBour, who had listened to the exchange on Gibb's show, under the headline "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light".

The Michigan Daily

Michigan DailyThe U. of M. DailyU. of M. Daily
The article was published in the October 14, 1969 issue of the Michigan Daily.
An October 14, 1969 Daily article by Fred LaBour and John Gray, entitled "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light", itemized various "clues", many of them of their own invention.

Douglas B. Green

Ranger DougRanger Doug GreenRanger Doug" Green
He provides commentary with fellow Rider in the Sky Douglas B. Green's satellite radio show "Ranger Doug's Classic Cowboy Corral" in the role of Ranger Doug's sidekick, the crusty old trail cook called Sidemeat.
Green provides commentary with fellow Rider in the Sky Fred LaBour (stand-up bassist stage-named Too Slim) in the role of Ranger Doug's sidekick, the crusty old trail cook called Sidemeat.

The Thorn

The Thorn starred John Hassberger as Jesus Christ with supporting roles of Bette Midler as the Virgin Mary; James Harrison as Joseph; John Greenburg as John the Baptist; Fred LaBour as the Angel Fred; Richard Pollard as Rabbi Gabriel; Diana David as Salome; and Jack Castor and Chi Chi as queens.

F. Lee Bailey

Francis Lee Bailey
LaBour also participated in an RKO television special that featured celebrity attorney F. Lee Bailey conducting a mock trial in which he examined various expert "witnesses" on the subject of McCartney's alleged death.
One of the experts was Fred LaBour, whose article in The Michigan Daily had been instrumental in the spread of the urban legend.

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Grand RapidsGrand Rapids, MIGrand Rapids area
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.

Grammy Award

GrammyGrammy AwardsGrammys
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.

Americans

AmericanAmericaUnited States
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.

Western swing

Country SwingTexas swingswing
Frederick LaBour (born June 3, 1948 in Grand Rapids, Michigan), better known by his stage name Too Slim, is a Grammy award-winning American musician, best known for his work with the Western swing musical and comedy group Riders in the Sky.

Double bass

bassupright bassacoustic bass
LaBour plays double bass and sings lead and background vocals.

Dickey Lee

Dickie LeeDicky LeeLaurie (Strange Things Happen)
Prior to joining the Riders, he played with country singer Dickey Lee's band.

Bonanza

Hoss CartwrightLittle Joe CartwrightBen Cartwright
A long-standing gag in the Rider's concerts is LaBour mishearing a request to play the theme from the television program Bonanza on the bass, and instead playing it by slapping his face.

Tennessee State University

Tennessee StateTennessee A&ITennessee A&I State College
LaBour's stage name, "Too Slim", came from a character he created at the Nashville Public Library while working with the puppet theater called "Singing Cowboy Slim", and from Ed "Too Tall" Jones, a football player at Tennessee State University who later joined the Dallas Cowboys.

Dallas Cowboys

DallasCowboysDallas Cowboy
LaBour's stage name, "Too Slim", came from a character he created at the Nashville Public Library while working with the puppet theater called "Singing Cowboy Slim", and from Ed "Too Tall" Jones, a football player at Tennessee State University who later joined the Dallas Cowboys.

University of Michigan

MichiganUniversity of Michigan, Ann ArborUniversity of Michigan at Ann Arbor
LaBour has a master's degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Michigan. While a junior at the University of Michigan, having heard the October 12, 1969 WKNR broadcast about the rumor, he and John Gray wrote a satiric parody review of Abbey Road called "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light", itemising various "clues", many of them of their own invention, of McCartney's death.

Satellite

satellitesartificial satelliteartificial satellites
He provides commentary with fellow Rider in the Sky Douglas B. Green's satellite radio show "Ranger Doug's Classic Cowboy Corral" in the role of Ranger Doug's sidekick, the crusty old trail cook called Sidemeat.

Sirius XM

Sirius XM RadioSiriusXMSirius XM Satellite Radio
The show currently airs Sundays at 7pm ET, and Saturdays at 6am ET, on Sirius-XM's Willie's RoadHouse SiriusXM Channel 56.

Urban legend

urban mythurban legendsurban myths
LaBour was instrumental in the spread of the Paul is Dead urban legend.

WKNR

WJWWRMRWJW (AM)
While a junior at the University of Michigan, having heard the October 12, 1969 WKNR broadcast about the rumor, he and John Gray wrote a satiric parody review of Abbey Road called "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light", itemising various "clues", many of them of their own invention, of McCartney's death.

Abbey Road

Abbey Road medleyGolden Slumbers/Carry That WeightAbbey Road (50th Anniversary)
While a junior at the University of Michigan, having heard the October 12, 1969 WKNR broadcast about the rumor, he and John Gray wrote a satiric parody review of Abbey Road called "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light", itemising various "clues", many of them of their own invention, of McCartney's death.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone MagazineRolling Stone IndonesiaRolling Stone'' magazine
Rolling Stone described LaBour's article as "the most baroque explication" of the supposed death, claiming that the Abbey Road cover depicted a funeral procession from a cemetery, with John as "anthropomorphic God, followed by Ringo the undertaker, followed by Paul the resurrected, barefoot with a cigarette in his right hand (the original was left-handed), followed by George, the grave digger", and adding details that Paul had died in a car crash three years earlier, the top of his head sheared off, and that he was the subject of the "A Day in the Life" car crash on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

A Day in the Life

Sugar Plum Fairy
Rolling Stone described LaBour's article as "the most baroque explication" of the supposed death, claiming that the Abbey Road cover depicted a funeral procession from a cemetery, with John as "anthropomorphic God, followed by Ringo the undertaker, followed by Paul the resurrected, barefoot with a cigarette in his right hand (the original was left-handed), followed by George, the grave digger", and adding details that Paul had died in a car crash three years earlier, the top of his head sheared off, and that he was the subject of the "A Day in the Life" car crash on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

Sgt. PepperSgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club BandSgt Pepper
Rolling Stone described LaBour's article as "the most baroque explication" of the supposed death, claiming that the Abbey Road cover depicted a funeral procession from a cemetery, with John as "anthropomorphic God, followed by Ringo the undertaker, followed by Paul the resurrected, barefoot with a cigarette in his right hand (the original was left-handed), followed by George, the grave digger", and adding details that Paul had died in a car crash three years earlier, the top of his head sheared off, and that he was the subject of the "A Day in the Life" car crash on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.